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If you want that? Why not get the stuff already in frames from a Dollar store or a place like Walmart. Cheaper I would imagine. Only if you want a specific size you can always cut it your self with a glass cutter. But carefully of course. ūüėČ But I guess if you want glazed or other go to a glass manufacturer. I'm sure you have some local places where you live. There's like a bunch of them where I live near by.

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17 hours ago, Brian Kapp said:

Do you buy museum glass, if so from where. Do you get it cut to order. Do you have a relatively inexpensive source. - Thanks.

We used to buy it in bulk directly from PPG or through one of their distributors like Larson-Juhl depending on volumes. Having said that how much are you looking for and what sizer? If it's not a lot and you don't mind a minor scratch or two then you might try a local framing store to see if they have any off cuts or imperfections they would be willing to sell for a discount. UV glass is notoriously difficult to work with. The coating is extremely thin and scratches very easily. The coating process is also prone to defects, with a certain percentage of imperfections considered acceptable. My point is that a good framing shop will cull these out and usually have a bin out back waiting to be broken up and discarded. Just a thought.

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If you mean Museum glass as in real glass, you don't buy it. There are many drawbacks using real glass. One of them is that it does not block UV rays 100%. It blocks some, but not all. (you can get a tan from behind glass for instance) As Foodio points out, there are some options pertaining to glass, but I still would not recommend it.

Buy Crystal Clear Acrylic. Modern Acrylics are not like in the old days anymore, they are very good nowadays.

Glass might be good for smaller frames, but anything over 16 x 20, I would go Acrylic.

I buy all my framing and film supplies from Bags Unlimited (the name is misleading, they do a lot more than bags) They are relatively cheap, but very good in my experience

https://www.bagsunlimited.com/category/438/frame-front-sheets-clear-acrylic

If you do insist on glass, you can buy it here: https://www.framedestination.com/framing-supplies/glass-and-acrylic.html

 

 

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Even the better glass like TruVue conservation clear is only UV rated at something like 99.7. Non-glare only marginally better. Museum grade acrylic though is no better. The problem with using any of it is that it gives people a false sense of security in thinking that their work is protected. Even with the best glass or acrylic hanging work in bright areas is going to kill it. The rule of thumb is if you can see the work then it is being damaged. Artificial light included. That's why even the best protected works on paper in museums under SoLux bulbs are given an annual maximum lumen exposure rating, after which they are rotated to the dark.

There are a couple of things to consider though with acrylic. In large sizes it is prone to warping with temperature changes. It is also very attractive to dust so an air compressor can be very helpful. It is also very difficult to clean without scratching.

 

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It really depends on how it's framed. To me  28 × 36 is still relatively small, especially if there's three inches of matting all around. If it's more like poster framing with a direct sandwich between the poster, acrylic and substrate (not recommended) then you could easily begin to see warping even at that size in even tame environments. Also the thickness of the acrylic is a big factor, but then again the thicker the acrylic the higher the cost. The fact that you keep yours out of direct sunlight makes all the difference too. You'd be surprised how many people don't. More generally though the closer you get to standard mat sizes of 32 × 40 and above (into the 40 X 60 oversize spectrum) the more problems you will have with acrylic. Even stripping the protective wrap can be a huge PITA.

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sure I agree. However for a 40 x 60 framed with glass might cause a whole new set of problems like weight.  Funny that you mention that size, I just sold 3 of that size, but they take care of the mounting/framing/hanging (Thank God)

 

Back in the days, I used to buy from PPG also, but that was for the aviation industry (They make most aircraft windows)

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I am sorry, I should have explained more. Thank you for all the info.

I have had a few things framed professionally over the years, for myself. Maybe museum is not the right term, or there are multiple terms. But it is glass that has no reflection, or virtually none, so that light sources like a lamp on, or a window, do not reflect and glare in it and block seeing the image. I know it is more costly but been worth it, for when I have chosen it. I guess my best bet is to go to that framer and ask about buying just the glass.

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2 hours ago, Brian Kapp said:

I am sorry, I should have explained more. Thank you for all the info.

I have had a few things framed professionally over the years, for myself. Maybe museum is not the right term, or there are multiple terms. But it is glass that has no reflection, or virtually none, so that light sources like a lamp on, or a window, do not reflect and glare in it and block seeing the image. I know it is more costly but been worth it, for when I have chosen it. I guess my best bet is to go to that framer and ask about buying just the glass.

What you're looking for is simply called "anti-reflective" glass, and it's an easy product to find. the best and cheapest is to buy ready-made frames made with anti-reflection glass in a specialized shop.

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1 hour ago, Scorsby said:

https://www.wessexpictures.com/glass_products.html

It's available at any picture framers. It's more expensive but not much more and they can cut it to any size for you. Thickness may be an issue if so link above.

Looks like a great company, but the only thing is they are in the UK and Illinois (Brian's place) is not  and neither is Miami. (my town). At least, not yet.

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7 hours ago, Rudy Umans said:

Looks like a great company, but the only thing is they are in the UK and Illinois (Brian's place) is not  and neither is Miami. (my town). At least, not yet.

I actually found several Rudy just by searching for non reflective glass supplier. But I've never been to a framers that hasn't offered me non reflective glass. Should be fairly easy to get ahold of.

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