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The camera fell to the ground. Although camera looks fine, the camera lens was stucked. I couldn't remove it. Once I did I noticed some broken pieces in the part that you spin to install the lens into the camera. When I put the lens on the camera it goes a little bit slack. Not sure whether I should send it to repair... 

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Oh damn. A similar thing happened to me not too long ago. I had my camera and tripod set up close to a road. A truck went past and came down the tripod. Looks like the lens adapter was damaged. I get an error message in the viewfinder indicating that the lens is not attached properly. I was also worried that the lens mount might be out of alignment. I removed the lens adapter and attached it to another camera for testing and now it's stuck. I cannot remove it. 

I hope you can get your lens fixed.

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11 minutes ago, Patrick Cooper said:

Oh damn. A similar thing happened to me not too long ago. I had my camera and tripod set up close to a road. A truck went past and came down the tripod. Looks like the lens adapter was damaged. I get an error message in the viewfinder indicating that the lens is not attached properly. I was also worried that the lens mount might be out of alignment. I removed the lens adapter and attached it to another camera for testing and now it's stuck. I cannot remove it. 

I hope you can get your lens fixed.

Now I count myself as double lucky. Photographing a passenger train, a high speed freight came whizzing by, the wind blew over my tripod. Front of the lens landed on the gravel next to the tracks. Lens mount wasn't broken and neither was the front element.

uv-filter.jpg

While off the top, Rudy is making a good guess, might not be worth fixing. Here's one more. Look on eBay for replacement parts. That looks like it's just screwed on, but I see no contacts, just an old fashion manual aperture control. How much is a use lens, just like it? There's you decision. If it costs more to fix, than a replacement, you have something nice for the book shelf or a home decoration.

 

 

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My dog is deaf and blind so bumping into my tripod is not uncommon. She is only small and light, and the tripod with camera and lens on it is really heavy, so no disasters so far though. I've learned to modify the way I shoot to avoid hurting her or the camera as much as possible, and keep my blood pressure down!
As Rob mentioned, I would check your household insurance if it's an expensive lens, I know mine would cover it.
Hope you can sort it out without to much hassle.
 

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Happened to me - about the third day I had my first good/decent Nikon, though not because of any animal, just me being clumsy. My new lens was broken but I had paid for insurance through Best Buy (where I bought it), so they sent a new one. The camera didn't appear damaged but I always was concerned from that time forward that photos weren't as good as they could have been had I not dropped it. Finally got a new upgraded camera. I doubt you have insurance through the store where you purchased, but if you do, it would be a good time to use it depending on the price of the lens.

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Good news and bad news.

- My insurance cover the lens. It was a telephoto 70-300, not very expensive, but money is money.

-Now the bad news, my hand is broken indeed. And I am going to need 3 weeks at least to recover. That's why I've decided to buy a new telephoto lens to make the wait more bearable.

 

¿Any recommendations?

-no more than 400$ (bearing in mind that my dog could broke it in any moment)

I am willing to buy second hand :D 

 

 

 

 

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What ever you do, make sure there are no bits left in the camera otherwise it could jam the shutter mechanism. Give it a good shake around with the lens mount cover off and sensor pointing down to the ground. It maybe worth taking it in to a camera shop for a sensor / general clean before using it again!

If you have access to a shop like Wex UK that deal with used gear then that is well worth doing... some good bargains and, you'll get 12 months warranty!!

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Normally when I record video the camera is attached to the tripod, therefore I don't really need Image stabilization (which my Nikon d5300 doesn't have). Nevertheless, I need a lens that has an autofocus motor, so I am torn between several options: 

Whether to buy a similar lens to the one I had, which was a Nikon AF-P DX NIKKOR 70-300mm f/4.5-6.3G ED VR, like, for instance, Sigma 70-300mm f/4-5.6 DG Macro (which has macro option) or go for a lens with longer focal length, like a second hand Tokina 80-400mm f/4.5-5.6 AT-X AF, which would cost me a little bit more.

 

 

 

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David, go to

https://pixelpeeper.com/

and with the combo of your camera and the lens you're looking to buy, LOOK at the pics they produce, at full size. Not all lenses are equal, and the only way you can tell is to see actual pics from one.

Also remember that as a rule of thumb, a zoom lens loses its sharpness at the "ends" if it's longer than 3 times the shortest length (for example 70mm x 3 = 210mm, so at 300mm it's "too long" ). Your pics will be soft at the short end as well as the long end, if they're sharp at all.

 

 

 

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Hello, after long research on the internet, I have finally looked into a Samyang 85mm f/1.4 AS IF UMC (AE). Although the AE chip won't work on my Nikon d5300.

I am unsure, since buying a lens with such a narrow depth of field without even being able to confirm focus seems crazy. On the other side, maybe it's just about patience to get it into focus. Any experience with this kind of manual lenses?

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47 minutes ago, David Moreno Hernandez said:

I am unsure, since buying a lens with such a narrow depth of field without even being able to confirm focus seems crazy. 

You would confirm focus by looking through the viewfinder. If it looks sharp on the viewfinder screen, than it's in focus!

I don't know about your camera but often, mirrorless cameras like mine have a manual focusing aid that allows you to digitally zoom into the picture, offering a high magnification view. This will make your focusing more accurate. And if this Samyang is anything like my Samyang 12mm f2, you would also focus with the aperture wide open. Depth of field will be at it's shallowest so focusing will be easier. Once you've finished focusing, close down the aperture to the required f stop.

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