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Request for Feedback on my Portfolio


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15 hours ago, M S Thakur said:

Hi , 

I am new to the stok photography therefore wants to have a feedback on my portfolio

thanks

Beautiful! 

wild-elephant-bathing-river-having-600w-

One thing I noticed, this image, like some others, is kind of hazy-looking.  It needs a little bit more contrast with some highlight reduction.  These are things you can fix in post, especially if you shoot raw.  For example:

1316467708_stock-photo-blue-and-yellow-boats-on-the-calm-and-serene-peaceful-blue-waters-of-the-ocean-in-goa-india-1642087921copy.thumb.jpg.e61bd15514990e3aff178c721d176ab4.jpg

This is a before and after shot showing your original thumbnail on the left, and my post-processing on the right.  I applied contrast, vibrance, and saturation, and leveled out the horizon.  That haze over the entire image desaturates it, making the image look washed out and the colors muddy and muted.  Post-processing can't save a bad photo, but it can mean the difference between having a photo that will sell and one that won't.  Shoot raw and post-process, even if it's just for minor edits like this.  :)

One last thing: watch the cropping on your images, and don't crop them too tightly.  Give the buyer room to make their own edits.  Cute puppy, but his nose is partially cut off:

black-white-photograph-dog-gray-600w-163

You've got a couple of really nice subjects and, if those are selling for you, I would focus on those.  Landscapes/seascapes are a category with lots of competition and you'll need to improve your timing (overhead sun is worst light of all for landscapes), composition (vertical landscapes NEED a strong vertically-oriented subject in them to be well-composed) and post-processing.

Good luck, welcome to SS, and I hope this helps.

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1 hour ago, Phil Lowe said:

Beautiful! 

wild-elephant-bathing-river-having-600w-

One thing I noticed, this image, like some others, is kind of hazy-looking.  It needs a little bit more contrast with some highlight reduction.  These are things you can fix in post, especially if you shoot raw.  For example:

1316467708_stock-photo-blue-and-yellow-boats-on-the-calm-and-serene-peaceful-blue-waters-of-the-ocean-in-goa-india-1642087921copy.thumb.jpg.e61bd15514990e3aff178c721d176ab4.jpg

This is a before and after shot showing your original thumbnail on the left, and my post-processing on the right.  I applied contrast, vibrance, and saturation, and leveled out the horizon.  That haze over the entire image desaturates it, making the image look washed out and the colors muddy and muted.  Post-processing can't save a bad photo, but it can mean the difference between having a photo that will sell and one that won't.  Shoot raw and post-process, even if it's just for minor edits like this.  :)

One last thing: watch the cropping on your images, and don't crop them too tightly.  Give the buyer room to make their own edits.  Cute puppy, but his nose is partially cut off:

black-white-photograph-dog-gray-600w-163

You've got a couple of really nice subjects and, if those are selling for you, I would focus on those.  Landscapes/seascapes are a category with lots of competition and you'll need to improve your timing (overhead sun is worst light of all for landscapes), composition (vertical landscapes NEED a strong vertically-oriented subject in them to be well-composed) and post-processing.

Good luck, welcome to SS, and I hope this helps.

Phil Lowe is right, there is not much to add. Phil Lowe is a sage among the sages and I really mean it.
a main point however which annoys me a little ... makes the effort to straighten the horizons, because on our dear planet, the sea, the lakes, the oceans ... are always horizontal, except for some artistic images, but this is another debate.
Of course the buyer will do it for you, but why not offer him (for the same price) a well finished job ?. 
You live in a Country which seems magic to me, take advantage of this opportunity that many do not have (On the Champs Élysées in Paris, there are no elephants who bathe in the fountains)😁
Try Lightroom, believe me, it changes your life.

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19 hours ago, M S Thakur said:

Hi Forum Members,

Though I have been doing photography as a hobby since a long time , I am still very new to the Stock Photography. As of now I have updated 89 photographs in my portfolio. 

I request all the veterans to kindly give your feedback on my portfolio so that I may improvise.

Thanks in advance

 

M S Thakur

 

Brady's not wrong about the crooked horizons. This can be corrected very easily at the PP. 
Otherwise you were lucky with the reviewers. More than 20 photos of the sea and a whole bunch of begonias. Plus the elephant shower (a nice photo), where the showering person is recognizable, without MR. 
Of the similar ones you should delete a part and I would submit the elephant shower as an editorial because of the recognizable man.
Otherwise two tips: 
Let the colors pop and make the subjects stand out better. 
To make the colors pop, I recommend modern software like C1. The color funbctions of C1 are outstanding. LR is a bit outdated and only available by subscription. 

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

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Yes, Phil is right, you have to de-haze many of your images and pop the colors a bit.

If you can't afford a paid software, you can use a free one like Gimp.

If you don't know much about post processing, I will also mention here an old, long forgotten software that nobody speaks about any more. That would be the discontinued, free  Google Picasa, the last version still available for download here. It doesn't have many features but it can auto-fix your images with one button push.

It also organizes and catalogs your images in seconds, without LR's clutter.

But if you want to buy a very good software without subscription and without breaking  the bank I recommend Affinity photo (~ $50).

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3 hours ago, Whiteaster said:

Yes, Phil is right, you have to de-haze many of your images and pop the colors a bit.

If you can't afford a paid software, you can use a free one like Gimp.

If you don't know much about post processing, I will also mention here an old, long forgotten software that nobody speaks about any more. That would be the discontinued, free  Google Picasa, the last version still available for download here. It doesn't have many features but it can auto-fix your images with one button push.

It also organizes and catalogs your images in seconds, without LR's clutter.

But if you want to buy a very good software without subscription and without breaking  the bank I recommend Affinity photo (~ $50).

Thanks a lot veterans . Your inputs are certainly going to be very helpful. 

The brightness observation is true. Will try to improvise.

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1 hour ago, M S Thakur said:

Thanks a lot veterans . Your inputs are certainly going to be very helpful. 

The brightness observation is true. Will try to improvise.

You're welcome.  I just wanted to show you that - even with editorial - the kind of image editing I'm discussing is allowed.  Here's a before/after of one of my most recently approved editorial images.  Correcting the lens's vignetting and revealing the colors in the sky and bushes by adjusting highlights and shadows, while adding some saturation, helps correct several issues and adds color and interest to this photo.  I shot this sign because I thought it was funny!  "Road Ends Here"?  Well, d'uh!  :D

2020-02-13_10-15-38.thumb.jpg.e0ce6ed8da5081f0727f6caf8b544d89.jpg

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One other thing that I would like to add is one of the things that takes you from someone who just takes pictures to someone who creates images and that is to be aware of the light. If you look at many of your shots you will see that the sky is washed out and the images are rather flat. A part of this is due to the hazing that has been discussed but some also has to deal with what the light was like when you took the image.

Many people new to photography think that light is light and as long as it is light out you get the shot. But if you learn to really see the light, its properties and how it effects your surroundings you can elevate your photography. Light changes throughout the day. It can be warm, it can be cold, it can be stark or it can be soft and comforting. Pay attention to the direction of the light and how it interacts with the object of your shot. Watch the shadows that the light creates. Shoot when the light best compliments your subject matter. Remember that the word Photography actually means the capture of light.

Google photographic lighting, or how does light effect photography. things like that and you will learn a great deal about the subject. Good luck to you.

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17 minutes ago, David P. Smith said:

be aware of the light

When I was visiting Washington state in late 2013, my in-laws took me to a restaurant in Gig Harbor for lunch.  I took my cameras with me, of course, On the way into town, I saw this beautiful view of the harbor with ice on it and Mt. Rainier in the background, but the mountain was lost in the mid-day haze.  So we ate lunch and -- at my request, we waited there in town for the sun to get lower in the sky (this was in December, so we didn't have to wait long).  The lower the sun got, the less hazy the distant mountain became.  When the light was just right, I got this series of images:

gig-harbor-washington-december-7-600w-16

gig-harbor-washington-december-7-600w-16

gig-harbor-washington-december-7-600w-70

David is quite right: landscapes are all about timing the light so it is just right in the way that it enhances your images.  These were all shot hand-held, so you don't need an expensive tripod and gear to do good landscape photography.  You just have to wait for the light.  :)

 

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54 minutes ago, David P. Smith said:

One other thing that I would like to add is one of the things that takes you from someone who just takes pictures to someone who creates images and that is to be aware of the light. If you look at many of your shots you will see that the sky is washed out and the images are rather flat. A part of this is due to the hazing that has been discussed but some also has to deal with what the light was like when you took the image.

Many people new to photography think that light is light and as long as it is light out you get the shot. But if you learn to really see the light, its properties and how it effects your surroundings you can elevate your photography. Light changes throughout the day. It can be warm, it can be cold, it can be stark or it can be soft and comforting. Pay attention to the direction of the light and how it interacts with the object of your shot. Watch the shadows that the light creates. Shoot when the light best compliments your subject matter. Remember that the word Photography actually means the capture of light.

Google photographic lighting, or how does light effect photography. things like that and you will learn a great deal about the subject. Good luck to you.

Thanks a ton. This is another amazing piece of information . You are absolutely right. Photography is primarily using light on the canvas of ones photograph. Thanks again. 

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