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Hi all, great community you all have here. I thought I would see if I could get some feedback on my portfolio, what I can do better and any other tips you might have. So far I haven't had any sales and it's a bit discouraging and want to know where I can improve. I have read that this is more of a marathon than a sprint and as I'm sure you know a bit of work goes into all the tagging, approvals, etc. so I'm hoping it will be worth it in the end.

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Eric,

It's obvious that you know what you're doing.  Your exposure is consistently very good which is a problem with most new contributors. Your composition is also good, however, IMO, you have a tendency to place your subject in the center of the image.  You might occasionally consider using the Rule of Thirds when framing up your subject.

Subject matter, is a problem for all of us.  Keep in mind that Stock Photography images are used primarily by businesses, bloggers, etc. to sell a product, place, idea or concept.  If your images don't assist the buyer in that goal they may have little commercial value and sales will be minimal.

Hopefully, other contributors will offer additional thoughts and assistance.  Good Luck with your marathon.    

    

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Hi Eric,

You have a good looking portfolio and should get some sales. It may sometimes take some time. 

I have a small photography/digital arts blog which is strongly oriented on producing stock media. I always want to point beginners to read especially this post: https://jamoimages.com/stock-photography-tips/

You can find there some golden tips that I personally have found very useful.

Best of Luck!

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You might want to improve on your titles and keywords. And the city scape of San Francisco could have been submitted as commercial. If there were any visible signs, you can just clone those out. You don't even have san francisco in your keywords so nobody looking for it is going to find it easily. Your butterfly images do not even list the type of butterfly it is. You need to do a bit more research and find out what species and then put those in your keywords and title as well. Include the scientific names for animals, etc. Some people will use those when they're looking for specific animals (or so I've been told). The keywords are what help people find your images. Without adequately covering as many as you can possibly find, customers are not going to find your images no matter how good they are.

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14 hours ago, Steve Bower said:

Eric,

It's obvious that you know what you're doing.  Your exposure is consistently very good which is a problem with most new contributors. Your composition is also good, however, IMO, you have a tendency to place your subject in the center of the image.  You might occasionally consider using the Rule of Thirds when framing up your subject.

Subject matter, is a problem for all of us.  Keep in mind that Stock Photography images are used primarily by businesses, bloggers, etc. to sell a product, place, idea or concept.  If your images don't assist the buyer in that goal they may have little commercial value and sales will be minimal.

Hopefully, other contributors will offer additional thoughts and assistance.  Good Luck with your marathon.    

    

Great advice, I'll definitely keep this in mind. Funny, I always admire the rule of thirds in other photos so I shouldn't be ignoring it myself.

8 hours ago, Jarmo Piironen said:

Hi Eric,

You have a good looking portfolio and should get some sales. It may sometimes take some time. 

I have a small photography/digital arts blog which is strongly oriented on producing stock media. I always want to point beginners to read especially this post: https://jamoimages.com/stock-photography-tips/

You can find there some golden tips that I personally have found very useful.

Best of Luck!

Hey, there are some great tips there, nice blog!

7 hours ago, Sheila Fitzgerald said:

You might want to improve on your titles and keywords. And the city scape of San Francisco could have been submitted as commercial. If there were any visible signs, you can just clone those out. You don't even have san francisco in your keywords so nobody looking for it is going to find it easily. Your butterfly images do not even list the type of butterfly it is. You need to do a bit more research and find out what species and then put those in your keywords and title as well. Include the scientific names for animals, etc. Some people will use those when they're looking for specific animals (or so I've been told). The keywords are what help people find your images. Without adequately covering as many as you can possibly find, customers are not going to find your images no matter how good they are.

Okay, I'll work on being more descriptive. I was assuming that if a word is in the title that it would be picked up as a keyword but I won't let that happen again. I did try to submit my SF photos as commercial but nearly all have been rejected because of building/visible trademarks (even though in some I could not find them at all) so editorial was the only way I could get accepted unfortunately. All great tips, thanks for taking the time to respond.

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5 hours ago, Eric Thurber said:

Okay, I'll work on being more descriptive. I was assuming that if a word is in the title that it would be picked up as a keyword but I won't let that happen again. I did try to submit my SF photos as commercial but nearly all have been rejected because of building/visible trademarks (even though in some I could not find them at all) so editorial was the only way I could get accepted unfortunately. All great tips, thanks for taking the time to respond.

The description helps the google searches find your images, the keywords help customers on the SS website find your images. So for key keywords, you want to have them in both the title and the description. Looks like you're in California as well. I see many cities listed near to where I am (I'm near Oakland - practically spitting distance from Fruitvale Bart).

 

And for the rejections of cityscapes, I will resubmit as commercial and hope that a more knowledgable reviewer gets it the next time, but I totally understand the frustration. I have a few as editorial as well. But i try to get them in as commercial when ever I can.

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