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Katherine Welles

Model studio shoot: best to submit chromakey green background or isolated on white?

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So I shot with a green chromakey background for the first time in studio today. Should I submit the model shots with the background as-is or should I do the standard "isolated on white" treatment? I can see pros and cons with both approaches. Any experience as to which will lead to more sales? Thanks!!!

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It depends on the lighting that you used on your subject and how it will fit into the background. Is it mimicking daylight, sunset, sunrise, night etc ( where you would use backlight for separation and perhaps gels for color balance ) or it is a studio shot on white where you used key and fill and possibly black card for separation? 

You could have both lighting scenarios on green, but not on white. I would submit both white and green because some clients don't know how, or don't have the means to make green  screen into white background.

I am curious how you lit the green screen.

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28 minutes ago, fotomak said:

some clients don't know how, or don't have the means to make green  screen into white background.

My daughter posed for me a few years back in front of a green screen (for video).  When I didn't think her shots were selling as well as I thought they should have on green, I keyed out the green myself and filled with black precisely for the reason you suggest.  

Before:

stock-footage-facial-expressions-talking

After:

stock-footage-facial-expressions-phone-c

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45 minutes ago, fotomak said:

It depends on the lighting that you used on your subject and how it will fit into the background. Is it mimicking daylight, sunset, sunrise, night etc ( where you would use backlight for separation and perhaps gels for color balance ) or it is a studio shot on white where you used key and fill and possibly black card for separation? 

You could have both lighting scenarios on green, but not on white. I would submit both white and green because some clients don't know how, or don't have the means to make green  screen into white background.

I am curious how you lit the green screen.

I'm curious about how that isolation on white works. In video, we use green screen because it is a color that doesn't usually appear in the subject, especially in the skin tones etc. But with white, how do you avoid that a highlight on someone's blond hair or a light reflection in their eyes isn't the same shade of white? Or do photo editors not just simply chroma key, but instead cut out the subject along color lines?

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2 minutes ago, Milo J said:

I'm curious about how that isolation on white works. In video, we use green screen because it is a color that doesn't usually appear in the subject, especially in the skin tones etc. But with white, how do you avoid that a highlight on someone's blond hair or a light reflection in their eyes isn't the same shade of white? Or do photo editors not just simply chroma key, but instead cut out the subject along color lines?

I think the OP indicated he shot on green but wonders whether he should selll the green screen unaffected or key out the green and fill with white.  A white fill won't affect the subject per se, but I chose black for mine because my daughter is fair-skinned and was wearing light clothing.  It's all about the contrast. ;)

You don't actually shoot on white for keying out white.  You shoot on white to produce a high key isolation, which is different than a chroma key.  I suppose you could do a garbage mask with a lum key, but that's way too much work.  

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The subject gets cut out by shape, the whole body including the reflections in the eyes so it is independent of colors. In fact the only thing in the photo that is 100% white is the background. So the highlight in the hair is a brighter shade of the blonde hue, it isn't white.  

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