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Photographers who influenced you the most


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My dad   humble, unknown and mostly alone. 

I don't even know names of 5 "famous" photographers, much less would I know anything about anyone's work, so I couldn't even discuss the topic. I don't know, and I don't care, as I don't see how

myself

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Hi Rudy, nice thread.

Just like Sari, I don't know famous photographers or care about but I've seen some that amazed me right here on SS (won't name them).

There is still a famous photographer, Elena Shumilova, a mother who photographs her kids in everyday life in the countryside, in a magical way that I've never seen before.
I would like to learn to use the light the way she does, (just dreaming).

 

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15 minutes ago, Whiteaster said:

Hi Rudy, nice thread.

Just like Sari, I don't know famous photographers or care about but I've seen some that amazed me right here on SS (won't name them).

There is still a famous photographer, Elena Shumilova, a mother who photographs her kids in everyday life in the countryside, in a magical way that I've never seen before.
I would like to learn to use the light the way she does, (just dreaming).

 

Thank you for that link. I had not heard about her before and I agree her lighting is magical. To me her bucolic work is very reminiscent of a painter who was very popular in the LE print market a while back. Robert Duncan...I think she may know of him.😊

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37 minutes ago, Whiteaster said:

Hi Rudy, nice thread.

Just like Sari, I don't know famous photographers or care about but I've seen some that amazed me right here on SS (won't name them).

There is still a famous photographer, Elena Shumilova, a mother who photographs her kids in everyday life in the countryside, in a magical way that I've never seen before.
I would like to learn to use the light the way she does, (just dreaming).

Thank you and no, they don't have to be famous.

I have seen her work before. She is very good indeed

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1 hour ago, Foodio said:

Thank you for that link. I had not heard about her before and I agree her lighting is magical. To me her bucolic work is very reminiscent of a painter who was very popular in the LE print market a while back. Robert Duncan...I think she may know of him.😊

Yes, it seems to be the same style, thank You for the name of the artist and also for the right word (bucolic), I love it.

However, her images look like they have been taken all in the golden hour, amazing lighting and color palette.

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Rudy do you remember the name of the lady on SS that took pics of her two little boys in a very story-telling way? She was from some place in Eastern Europe, I think I remember seeing some pics from Prague? I'll have to see if I can find her port.

 

edit - haha, found it like in two secs...LOL

 

adorable-boy-on-railway-station-600w-228

silhouette-boy-standing-on-stairs-600w-2

 

Looks like the little ones grew up and she might have a third one, too? :)

https://www.shutterstock.com/g/Tatyana+Tracy+Tomsickova

She has so many good ones, but the real gems are hard to find now :(

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10 minutes ago, Sari ONeal said:

Rudy do you remember the name of the lady on SS that took pics of her two little boys in a very story-telling way? She was from some place in Eastern Europe, I think I remember seeing some pics from Prague? I'll have to see if I can find her port.

 

edit - haha, found it like in two secs...LOL

 

Looks like the little ones grew up and she might have a third one, too? :)

https://www.shutterstock.com/g/Tatyana+Tracy+Tomsickova

She has so many good ones, but the real gems are hard to find now :(

I do now! lol  ("Do you remember...."  is asking a lot Sari :) )

 

I like these a little better then the one Whiteaster link to frankly. Not so much post processing

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5 hours ago, Tayfun Yaman said:

Most of the photographers influenced me are already written but the most inspiring one for me is Ara Güler who i had an opportunity to meet.

He had a cafe in Istanbul where photographers meet and listen his stories.

How nice to have a place like that.

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19 hours ago, Rudy Umans said:

How nice to have a place like that.

Yeah there really was nice spots for photographers to meet like Ara cafe or another place called Hayyam passage where you find old photography stuff, sit and have chat with other photographers. I don't know the current situation though. The most missed things for me about İstanbul.

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21 minutes ago, AlessandraRC said:

a friend who taught me about everything I know in photography... a great photographer who will probably die and no one will ever hear bout him ...

This is your chance to let the world know!!

Who is he? Does he have a website?

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Almost forgot. I once went on a photo trip in 1989 to Egypt organised by Dutch photo magazine 'Focus' and we had Rineke Dijkstra along with us to advise and teach along the way. She was awarded the Hasselblad Award in 2017. I learned a lot from her. Although we were using actual film, in my case slide film which I always used and digital doesn't come even close to the sharpness.

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Most influential to me are:

 Richard Avedon for portraits

 Galen Rowell for landscapes

 Helmut Newton for subject matter

 Misha Gordin for art

 Gregory Heisler for lighting

Hard to list only five so I'll add Martin Schoeller, Irving Penn, Gregory Crewdson, Llorca Dicorcia, Dan Winters Andreas Gurski, Moshe Brakha, many Magnum photographers especially Salgado and Cartier-Bresson, many fashion photographers especially Demarchelier, William Clein and Paolo Roversi and many many others. Artists and photographers documentaries are my favorite thing to watch.

I like many of the photographers others already mentioned especially Erwin Olaf.

 

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  • 1 month later...

f/64 and the Zone System, no particular individual. But reminder I come from that days of black and white, processing my own photos, in my darkroom in the basement.

That has changed to electronic images and processing my images on a computer, but the basic concept remains. And no I'm not all prissy and perfect about 11 zones and all that, just a basic way of seeing the images.

Funny thing, expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights still works.

 

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4 hours ago, HodagMedia said:

f/64 and the Zone System, no particular individual. But reminder I come from that days of black and white, processing my own photos, in my darkroom in the basement.

That has changed to electronic images and processing my images on a computer, but the basic concept remains. And no I'm not all prissy and perfect about 11 zones and all that, just a basic way of seeing the images.

Funny thing, expose for the shadows and develop for the highlights still works.

 

f/64 (glad you wrote that the proper way and not like F64 or something). For people who don't know, f/64 was a club of west coast photographers who practiced and promoted "Straight Photography"  (Straight as in straight forward or "pure") in the first half of the 20th century. Straight Photography was the answer of Paul Strand somewhere between 1915-1920 to the then still popular "Pictorialism" movement, which was very painterly. Paul Stand showed his images to Alfred Stieglitz and he told Paul Strand that he started something new....and so it began. In Stieglitz and Steichen's Gallery 291 in NY City to be exact. From there it went to Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, Imogene Cunningham, and others and became an actual "movement". Contrary to what some might believe, Ansel Adams wasn't all that involved until 1930 or so. Also thanks to Paul Strand btw . Edward Weston came up with that small aperture notion  way before the f/64 club. As a matter of fact, Edward Weston was known to modify his lenses with masks with a smaller aperture like f/135 or f/233 even so he could get his whole tabletop subjects into focus. The bell pepper series was done this way and since Weston only made 8 x 10 contact prints, diffraction problems with those small apertures were not much of an issue.

f/64 was in principle a gallery club and  the west coast answer to those "art snobs" in New York. ("We show them" was their attitude). 

Weston btw., also came up with this whole previsualization concept thing way before Adams.  Weston was the one who told Ansel Adams about it.  Adams did come up with the Zone System though as far as I know.

It is funny in a way that Pictorialism has made a somewhat of a comeback now in digital with all the lighting, glowing and vignetting effects that are so popular now. (As some examples in this thread). Film has made a comeback too, but as Straight or Pure photography. (except for pinhole of course, which is by default painterly)

 

so Pete... you HAD to bring up f/64 and get me going. Sorry about my long winding pointless expression of narcissism. :) Sometimes I can't help myself

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Alfred Stieglitz, I recall years ago in college finding a book of Stieglitz work and being blown away. When I fist started I spent time looking at images, thousands of images, hours at the library thumbing through book after book and Stieglitz's work was just different, it made me say "wow". 

Also the work of the f/64 group impressive.

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