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Post-processing: Photoshop or Lightroom?


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5 hours ago, Milo J said:

Completely unenlightened question: if I'm only shooting JPG, would Lightroom still offer good (easy / fast / preset) editing capabilities for things such as perspective, overall exposure, white balance and saturation? Or would I need to start shooting in RAW?

Currently I'm using Gimp and Preview. I don't do very much to my images. But I got the free license offer from Adobe.

You can take up Adobe's offer of a free app (valid 'til Feb 2022) or not but you cannot gift it to someone else or sell it, apparently.

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On 2/15/2021 at 5:48 PM, Milo J said:

Completely unenlightened question: if I'm only shooting JPG, would Lightroom still offer good (easy / fast / preset) editing capabilities for things such as perspective, overall exposure, white balance and saturation? Or would I need to start shooting in RAW?

Currently I'm using Gimp and Preview. I don't do very much to my images. But I got the free license offer from Adobe.

You can use LR for post production work on JPGs but results may be limited. A RAW image will have all the information captured by the camera so you can make much bigger adjustments compared to JPGs. JPG is a compressed file format so only has the information for the image as it is seen. 

Personally, I open up my images in Camera RAW on Photoshop which cuts out the need for LR on single images. 

I still use LR for stitching photos together to make a panoramic image. You can use LR to apply the same changes to a batch of images. This is really useful when you want to create timelapse or hyperlapse video clips.

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  • 1 month later...

Lightroom excels at image organization and basic raw editing in a non-destructive environment. In recent years, they’ve made some monumental advancements in the Develop module that bring over the power of Photoshop.

For example: range masking in Lightroom is a basic replacement for luminosity masking in Photoshop. While the results won’t be as good as what you can achieve in Photoshop, it’s a huge leap forward as you can now tailor your adjustments to specific color or tonal ranges. It’s also a simple way to introduce you to the concept of restricting your edits to a “slice” of the value scale. 

I think if you start with range masking, you’ll see a huge difference in the quality of your processing.

This video here explains range masking in great detail: https://creativeraw.com/enhanced-processing-with-the-range-mask-in-lightroom/

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