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Since 1 and half year i created this account but some how i dont get any single image buyer as i am doing something wrong or something else i have to do to generate income from Shutterstock.

I got advice that if you take picture and submit to contribution shutterstock you will get paid for every pic which has been selected.

 

Please guide me if some experts in this forum.

I am traveller and fond of taking extra ordinary pics from my Iphone which worth of million dollars in coming year

so i need support on my copyright pics

if you or anyone who you know who can support me then Thanks in advance for your gentlemen gesture

DharamNeeL

https://www.shutterstock.com/g/DharamNeel?rid=230683507&utm_medium=email&utm_source=ctrbreferral-link

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I was sorely tempted to revisit some old posts from all the way back in January of this year to remind folks that some of us were saying the same things in response to his advice back then and were vi

The mistake the quality people make is that they don't distinguish between Photoclub quality and stock photo quality.  The time used, the lighting, the lens, the sensor etc. are of course not unimpo

Your fotos are quite ok, but some got problems with the shadows. Use equipement, as Evgeniia adviced and/or lokal shadow corrections in PP. But too few, of course. 3 sales for 87 fotos is not bad

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Hello DharamNeel,

First of all you have way too small portfolio. You need to build portfolio of thousands of photos.

Secondly, learn to edit your photos well. There's plenty of free apps to edit your photos on a phone.

Third, remember to add all relevant information of the image to the keywords and captions.

Fourth, learn photography basics and composition... 😉

You can find more tips in my blog too: https://jamoimages.com/stock-photography-tips/

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On 10/26/2019 at 4:50 PM, DharamNeel said:

 

I got advice that if you take picture and submit to contribution shutterstock you will get paid for every pic which has been selected.

That was bad advice. You do not get paid just for Shutterstock accepting your pictures. They accept pretty much everything. You only get paid if someone actually buys one of your pictures.

I am sorry to say so, but your images look like some couple's private vacation photos,  just not very good, washed out, poor composition, boring subjects, snapshots at best. Not something you would print as an advert for your company or use in some news article. Not saying that there might not be a customer needing exactly this somewhere, but I think the market for this is tiny and the supply for such images is enormous.
Learn basics about photography and when you browse the internet or look through your newspaper take a close look at what kind of pictures are used in ads and news articles.

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Maybe the customers are having trouble finding the photos?  You could work on your titles some more to help customers find your images.

https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/model-giving-shoot-near-by-lake-1382804585?src=r3o0QNqE0JVZdvXSRf6FxA-1-7

"Model giving shoot near by lake of some village somewhere western part of India"

It's a bit vague and probably won't show up well in the search.

From what I've read, customers are searching for very specific things like "man thinking lake background"  

The reading I've done, suggests that the pennies start trickling in at about 500-700 quality photos.  There's a lot of stuff online that says we should expect a few hundred a month once we get to 7,000 relevant photos. But small portfolios like ours (I have about the same number of images as you) are harder for customers to find so we have to do better with search optimization and providing what the customer wants.

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Sorry, Joe, that is really bad advice. Have you looked at the portfolio? Uploading more of the same style images with the same style descriptions will not do anything for him.

Dharam, I believe your biggest problem is that your descriptions and keywords are completely useless. This is the only way buyers can find your pictures!

For example this: "Wildlife creature found near park somewhere in Canada".  Sorry, but that will NEVER get found by anyone. If someone needs a picture of a black squirrel sitting on grass, that is what they will be searching for. So, for everything you shoot, you need to take the time to describe it properly. If you don't know the name of the animal or place, then research it. And make sure your keywords actually match what is in the image. Your squirrel shot includes incorrect keywords like "bird", "branch" and "tree", while missing the one keyword it really needs, which is "black squirrel".

image.png.8da52cad0303695dac5af343e5411e82.png

 

Your second problem is that most of your pictures are just not good enough. Let's say someone finds your squirrel picture. Ask yourself: why would they purchase yours, when they can have this one instead for the same price?

image.png.4d3b1e5d155baac65c3b0bf6ace8c185.png

 

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1 hour ago, Milo J said:

Sorry, Joe, that is really bad advice. Have you looked at the portfolio? Uploading more of the same style images with the same style descriptions will not do anything for him.

Dharam, I believe your biggest problem is that your descriptions and keywords are completely useless. This is the only way buyers can find your pictures!

For example this: "Wildlife creature found near park somewhere in Canada".  Sorry, but that will NEVER get found by anyone. If someone needs a picture of a black squirrel sitting on grass, that is what they will be searching for. So, for everything you shoot, you need to take the time to describe it properly. If you don't know the name of the animal or place, then research it. And make sure your keywords actually match what is in the image. Your squirrel shot includes incorrect keywords like "bird", "branch" and "tree", while missing the one keyword it really needs, which is "black squirrel".

image.png.8da52cad0303695dac5af343e5411e82.png

 

Your second problem is that most of your pictures are just not good enough. Let's say someone finds your squirrel picture. Ask yourself: why would they purchase yours, when they can have this one instead for the same price?

image.png.4d3b1e5d155baac65c3b0bf6ace8c185.png

 

Great and very valuable advice. Totally agree that simply ramping up the numbers (which should indeed be done) will get the OP nowhere.

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34 minutes ago, Ackab Photography said:

Great and very valuable advice. Totally agree that simply ramping up the numbers will get the OP nowhere.

 

54 minutes ago, Firn said:

If he has not earned a single cent with his photos the way they are now advising him to just upload more without changing anything is really poor advice, because 0 cent x 10000 ist still 0 cent.

 

1 hour ago, D O-P Photography said:

I find it very sad that new contributors are led away from the sort of real help and advice given to new contributors on the forum just to make a point. The same point again and again. It's irresponsible and yet he then tells people on the forum with less than 1k photos that they are not qualified to give advice. Ironic.

I was sorely tempted to revisit some old posts from all the way back in January of this year to remind folks that some of us were saying the same things in response to his advice back then and were vilified for it.  I'm glad to see people are starting to understand that you don't need a large port to be successful at this, rather, you need high quality images that people want.  There are plenty of those ports around, and the contributors who own them are highly successful doing this.

Sorry, DharamNeel, I agree with Milo J and the others: the very first thing you need to do is work on your photography skills.  The squirrel photo is a picture anyone with a cell phone could have taken, so why should they buy it here, especially when there are thousands of better squirrel photos from which to choose?

You are competing against thousands of other photographers here for a chance to sell your work, but if your work is not at least as good as theirs, and if it's not described and keyworded properly, you're not going to make any sales. 

Light, focus, exposure, composition, and subject selection are all critical in producing the kind of work that sells here.  And, for the record, this is what Shutterstock's guide to contributor success has to say about it:

2019-08-07_14-26-28.thumb.jpg.f489fd1b31890d22f92cb7cb592164b1.jpg

Is your work inspired, professional, and of high quality?  If not, you could upload a million images and you simply won't have the kind of success you're hoping for here.

I would start with some tutorials on youtube on how to use your camera and how to make great shots with it.  If you are passionate about photography, then you should relish the opportunity to learn and grow as a photographer.  If not, I think you might find this to be a fruitless and frustrating enterprise.

Best of luck to you and I hope this all helps.

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25 minutes ago, Ackab Photography said:

Great and very valuable advice. Totally agree that simply ramping up the numbers (which should indeed be done) will get the OP nowhere.

Agreed, large numbers of poorly done, low commercial value images will not work in competition with better images and you don't need to be a genius to work that out. 

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Having more photo in your portfolio can of course yield great results, but as others have stated, the photos have to be able to be found in order to even be considered for purchasing.  Plus as already mentioned, even if people can find them, they have to be unique as well in order to draw attention to them.  Even with a small portfolio, you can make a bit of money.  I have 275 images in mine, and I have just passed 50 downloads, so it absolutely is possible.  I'm far from making a fortune with my small portfolio, but it does prove that with good key wording and unique images, you can sell.  I don't even consider my work and key wording top notch compared to others in here.  If I was to get my ass in gear, I feel I could definitely do better then I already am. 

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49 minutes ago, geogif said:

To make it clear:

Did you get the 50 DLs this week or this month?

What difference does it make?  He has 50 more downloads than the OP, and has a good start on his port.  Do you think 50 downloads disqualifies him from commenting here???

🤔

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44 minutes ago, chris kolaczan said:

It is hard to tell exactly what customers need so there is certainly value in having oddball images and such (every port should have them)

This is my oddball image: dead leaf dog.  Sold once.  Glad I shot it!  :)

stock-photo-dead-leaves-on-tree-stump-in

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33 minutes ago, Phil Lowe said:

What difference does it make?  He has 50 more downloads than the OP, and has a good start on his port.  Do you think 50 downloads disqualifies him from commenting here???

🤔

You really have the opinion that it makes no difference, if someone has 50 DLs in one day, one week or one year?

Really? All the same?

Interesting. 

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54 minutes ago, geogif said:

You really have the opinion that it makes no difference, if someone has 50 DLs in one day, one week or one year?

Really? All the same?

Interesting. 

In the context of helping the OP: yes, it does not matter.  All the same.  Perspective.  Mark has 50, OP has zero.  Think Mark might be doing at least something right compared to the OP???

But, more importantly, I find this attitude that you - and others - think people who aren't as successful as you should have no voice here.  I find that attitude appalling.

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1 hour ago, Phil Lowe said:

In the context of helping the OP: yes, it does not matter.  All the same.  Perspective.  Mark has 50, OP has zero.  Think Mark might be doing at least something right compared to the OP???

This is basically the point I was trying to put across.  Sales can happen with a small port.  Definitely not going to retire off it, but just that a few bucks can be made.  I didn't go into this expecting to get rich.  More to see if sales could be had.

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6 hours ago, Mark Evers Photography said:

50DLs in about a year.  I honestly had a few prior to that, but most have been within the last year.

Thanks for the answer.
My question was serious and not meant to be an attack.
Because if you describe the success or failure of a PF, there is never just one parameter important. Even if some moles who can't look over their own mound think so.
The game is three-dimensional, not one-dimensional.
Whoever says that ONLY size is important or ONLY quality is important, is talking nonsense. 
The parameters
Size
Quality AND 
time
are of equal importance. Therefore, all three factors have to be taken into account if you want to classify a statement about sales.
Therefore my question, as I said, no personal attack 

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

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Your photos look like photos from a family album. Now you are wasting your time. Photos are not at all attractive, so they are not bought. Your landscapes are bad. I have a feeling that in India it is always cloudy. Take pictures on a clear day. The sky should be blue. People (if you have a release) should not stand and look at the camera. They have to do something. For example, hold the phone, stand sideways and talk. This is called the plot. There are editorial photos when you can’t take a release and take pictures of a crowd or place of interest. Then you need to properly draw up such photos and accurately indicate the place. Yes, they can buy such an editorial because there are no other photos from this city in the photo bank.

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2 hours ago, D O-P Photography said:

If you add in subject matter and keywords that's the recipe. Which ingredients are most important is what people debate. Yes time isn't often mentioned but as you say is key. I am selling for the first time quite a few images each month now. 

Size only matters as it relates to diversity, not quantity.  (I know you're aware of this.  I'm just trying to avoid addressing that other guy directly).  A port of 1 million images of the same subject ("spamfolios") is not going to sell as well as a port of 100 different subjects that are professionally produced.

Now obviously, anyone shooting a number of diverse subjects is going to grow their portfolio, but the mistake the "numbers people" make is assuming that they're getting sales because of the sheer size of their ports, when it's the diversity that matters.

And the number one factor is relevance: producing images having high commercial appeal.  Any port having that combination of relevance, diversity, and quality - regardless of size - will be a winner, (assuming descriptions are not truncated all to hell and the keywords are comprehensive and relevant).

 

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The mistake the quality people make is that they don't distinguish between Photoclub quality and stock photo quality. 
The time used, the lighting, the lens, the sensor etc. are of course not unimportant, not even for Stock. But much more important for stock photos is the content. This is the main quality feature. 
For stock photos, I take the camera that fits the location. This is usually not my best camera.
 My best bestseller by far was made with a 12MP toy camera.  And in addition, it was worked on in a dilettantish way in the post production.
In a photo club the picture would be too bad even for the trash can. 
At Stock it sells several times a week since 2 years. 

One more thing about the commercial value and usability:
Basically that is of course the most important thing. Unfortunately we don't know who buys the picture and what he wants to use it for. Therefore it is completely impossible to include this important factor. You only see it afterwards.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator

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3 minutes ago, geogif said:

they don't distinguish between Photoclub quality and stock photo quality. 

That's right, because a properly lit, focused, composed, and exposed shot is not just an option: Shutterstock demands it, and those qualities are not unique to "photo clubs", whatever the hell those are!

But again, we're trying to help a contributor with 0 sales learn what it takes to get his first, not rationalize how and why bad photos can be accepted and even, occasionally, sell.

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