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Photo Examples of Good Rule or Technique Application, Help for the New Contributor


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Most of us that have been here a while have done our share of critiquing the portfolios of our many newcomers, often a bit more harshly than we intended or possibly should have. 

While I realize none of us want to give away our "secrets", I thought it might be more helpful than telling (the novice photographer) if we submitted photos from our portfolios that would illustrate a photographic rule (rule of thirds, leading lines, merges, etc.) or post processing technique (sky replacement, focus stacking, HDR, etc.).  Don't limit your examples to just these few suggestions, submit anything you may have learned that might be a help to a new photographer.

These photos can be either an example of the good use of the rule or technique, or an outright failure (your choice).  Explain what you are trying to illustrate (i.e. rule of thirds) and how it should or shouldn't be done.  Please keep it On TOPIC and helpful.  Let's see what you've got that might help both the novice and us "old timers".   

 

This image shows the use of a slow shutter speed when photographing a waterfall in order to produce creamy blurred water rather than the dreaded "frozen water" look created by using a shutter speed of 1/60 of a second or higher (faster).  There is not a specific shutter speed needed to create this creamy look (as it is dependent on the amount and speed of the water in the fall) but a good starting point is somewhere around a 1/6 of a second or slower.  Experiment and see what creates the look you want.  Needless to say a tripod will be needed in most cases and sometimes a ND filter and or polarizer to slow that shutter speed.  Adjusting your aperture (smaller i.e. f8 to f22) should be (IMO) your first step when trying to slow down your shutter speed.  In most cases the increase in DOF (created by the small aperture) will be an advantage.  

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Most of us that have been here a while have done our share of critiquing the portfolios of our many newcomers, often a bit more harshly than we intended or possibly should have.  While I realize

After 13 pages, I have no idea if it came up already or not, but just to be sure, sometimes it is good to ignore typical composition rules and leave some space for the buyer for copy or  cropping.

My apologies to those of you who are getting tired of seeing this thread but in reviewing my portfolio images I noticed how often I have used an "S" curve in the composition of my images.  While I lik

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Starsphinx,

Thanks for your comments.  Based upon the lack of response thus far and the attitudes of some of the newbies expressed (on this forum) currently and in the past, I'm not sure there is going to be sufficient desire to "help" the newcomer.  That's regrettable but it may be the current situation here at SS.

If I get no assistance, I'll let this thread die a natural death.     

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as a newbie I thought the idea was great, as I have no interest in submitting a thousand image of butterflies, and I joined to improve this aspect of my eye. 

 

curious on above did you use a polarizer? I had a few tries, and ended up unhappy with seeing too much of the bottom, so cropped to panaromic format 

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35 minutes ago, Steve Bower said:

Starsphinx,

Thanks for your comments.  Based upon the lack of response thus far and the attitudes of some of the newbies expressed (on this forum) currently and in the past, I'm not sure there is going to be sufficient desire to "help" the newcomer.  That's regrettable but it may be the current situation here at SS.

If I get no assistance, I let this thread die a natural death.     

I am kind of in a second flush - when I first got a camera about 6-7 years ago I went through the enthusiastic newbie stage and uploaded to a microstock site which, very rightly, resulted in some severe but honest criticism.  I learned from it.  I much reduced uploading and went and put the advice into practice.  I am now back approaching stock seriously - and am a better photographer for the criticism and advice given and which I will no doubt get more off.  I am still enthusiastic because I love doing this - but it is tempered with the recognition that it takes time and work and most wonderfully of all I will never stop learning.

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Massif pic du Canigou.  FRANCE- 9 juillet 2016. Le Canigou est le sommet oriental des Pyrénées, le Canigou, il culmine à 2 784,66 mètres.

Dans un paysage ou une image, pour montrer la profondeur ou l'immensité, il est souvent nécessaire de placer au premier plan un ou plusieurs éléments (feuillage, branches, objet, personne ...) afin d'obtenir cette sensation de profondeur favorable à une qualité image. Personnellement, j'applique toujours cette règle indispensable. Picture of vines and Mount Canigou, in the Eastern Pyrenees in summer. (South of France)
Pour votre information, merci Steve Bower pour cette idée qui aurait un peu plus de qualité dans les images de Shutterstock.

Edited by Jacky D
Lieu de la prise de vue
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As others have mentioned, using leading lines in as close to a "rule of thirds" composition as possible to help guide the eye through the photo, and maybe even tell a story.  Common in landscapes, this can be more difficult with wildlife photography since the animals may not stand where you want them to, but it is certainly something to look out for and consider since it makes for a more effective "environment shot."


wild-turkey-crosses-road-near-450w-11973

eastern-coyote-sometimes-colloquially-re

 

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Mike, Jacky D & Puffin's Pictures

Thanks for participating and submitting your fine examples.

Leading Lines:  I didn't expect to see such interest in this. 

This is a QUESTION only, please don't take offence.  While this may just be me, I prefer that the leading lines point you to the subject or a least to an in focus element (i.e. Puffin's wolf).  What is the collective thought on this?  It's probably just a matter of taste or artistic expression but I thought it worthy of discussion.

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2 hours ago, Jacky D said:

Massif pic du Canigou.  FRANCE- 9 juillet 2016. Le Canigou est le sommet oriental des Pyrénées, le Canigou, il culmine à 2 784,66 mètres.

Dans un paysage ou une image, pour montrer la profondeur ou l'immensité, il est souvent nécessaire de placer au premier plan un ou plusieurs éléments (feuillage, branches, objet, personne ...) afin d'obtenir cette sensation de profondeur favorable à une qualité image. Personnellement, j'applique toujours cette règle indispensable. Picture of vines and Mount Canigou, in the Eastern Pyrenees in summer. (South of France)
Pour votre information, merci Steve Bower pour cette idée qui aurait un peu plus de qualité dans les images de Shutterstock.

Pour ceux qui ne parlent pas ou ne lisent pas le français ...

Translation of Jacky D's Post:

In a landscape or an image, to show the depth or immensity, it is often necessary to place in the
foreground one or more elements (foliage, branches, object, person ...) in order to obtain this
sensation of favorable depth at an image quality. Personally, I always apply this indispensable rule.
Picture of vines and Mount Canigou, in the Eastern Pyrenees in summer. (South of France)
For your information, thank you Steve Bower for this idea that would have a little more quality
in the images of Shutterstock.
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5 minutes ago, Steve Bower said:

Mike, Jacky D & Puffin's Pictures

Thanks for participating and submitting your fine examples.

Leading Lines:  I didn't expect to see such interest in this. 

This is a QUESTION only, please don't take offence.  While this may just be me, I prefer that the leading lines point you to the subject or a least to an in focus element (i.e. Puffin's wolf).  What is the collective thought on this?  It's probably just a matter of taste or artistic expression but I thought it worthy of discussion.

I was thinking precisely the same thing, my impression is/was that the lines should lead the viewer somewhere with a payoff at the end, not merely having lines in an image.  It's also kind of predicated on what part of the world the viewer is from as to what direction they read the written word, left to right or right to left even top to bottom.  As viewers of an image we tend to process it in the same fashion.

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2 hours ago, Jacky D said:

Royal castle of Fontainebleau. France - January 18th, 2014. The castle is of Renaissance style and classic, located near the downtown area of Fontainebleau (Seine-et-Marne)

Castle Fontainebleau about sixty kilometers south-east of Paris, France.
It is often interesting to frame the main subject to give more strength to the image. Here I used the entrance grids to frame the castle. FYI: This image has been downloaded 75 times in various countries.

Another aspect of composition is the use of symmetry, a very good example here in Jacky's image is the gate itself.

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This is not a "rule" or technique and may be something that everyone knows but I thought I would share it since it's "In The News" (on the forum) currently.

First off, I switched from a full frame Canon to the Olympus OMD EM 1 mk II about two years ago.  I am not that familiar with other camera manufacture's features so if this qualifies as "everybody knows that", please forgive me.

KEEPING THE HORIZON STRAIGHT.  This is something that plagued me constantly before I switched to Olympus.  Most, if not all of their OMD Cameras have a level at the bottom of both the viewfinder and the LCD which will indicate whether you have the horizon straight.  This (keeping the horizon straight) was difficult for me when there were other competing angles within the image (see attached).  This may be a feature in all mirrorless cameras and may also be on the latest DSLR from the major manufactures but for me it has been a huge help in composing my images.   

z  _7301160  adj.jpg

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  • Steve Bower changed the title to Photo Examples of Good Rule or Technique Application, Help for the New Contributor

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