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fahadkz

How do you guys promote your images

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So, I've been into stock photography for 2-3 years now and I wanna know how do you guys promote your images. Or do you guys simply not promote at all. If I'm being honest I've earned 15 bucks so far. And that's the reason I'm trying to figure out if promotion does plays a part in it or not. I also do know that the images should be meaningful to get sales.

So tell me promotion or no

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4 minutes ago, fahadkz said:

So, I've been into stock photography for 2-3 years now and I wanna know how do you guys promote your images. Or do you guys simply not promote at all. If I'm being honest I've earned 15 bucks so far. And that's the reason I'm trying to figure out if promotion does plays a part in it or not. I also do know that the images should be meaningful to get sales.

So tell me promotion or no

No, not for selling files on microstock. If you've got a website you could add links if you really wanted, but I really wouldn't bother with social media for this side of your photography. 

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Yes, SS does the heavy lifting for us, but why would it hurt to promote yourself in social media? I have links to all my microstock sites on Facebook and on my company website. I used to post "just sold" or milestone posts on Facebook as well until I decided it was becoming annoying to my regular followers. Now I only publish personal images that do not end up on stock. Somehow I've managed to find a following. I get requests every few months for images via Facebook and my company website and usually point buyers to the microstock sites.

If you've got the time and inclination, promote yourself. If you need to build out your portfolio more, do that. Trying for qality images, positive forum posts and some social media coverage seem to have worked for me.

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3 часа назад Александр Ротенберг сказал:

По-моему,  у @mandritoiu было несколько функций от SS, я надеюсь, что это поможет к еще нескольким продажам, я полагаю.

Помимо прямых функций, обычная маркировка на Instagram и т. Д. Может быть хорошей для повышения видимости, что помогает получить ваш бренд, как фотограф, там. Это может привести к возможностям. 

Place your portfolio advertisement on your T-shirt

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I have been featured 3 times (maybe 4) so far, indeed. But I cannot say it triggered any extra sales. Buyers buy what they need, not necessarily what is pushed in front of them.

Other than bragging rights, what's the benefit for you?

I suppose you can use it towards pitching to magazines for tutorials as example of your expertise. Or an editor may pick up on it and want to interview you...has that happened?

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7 hours ago, fahadkz said:

So, I've been into stock photography for 2-3 years now and I wanna know how do you guys promote your images. Or do you guys simply not promote at all. If I'm being honest I've earned 15 bucks so far. And that's the reason I'm trying to figure out if promotion does plays a part in it or not

I've been on SS for a little less time than you have and know I still have lot's to learn about microstock and what makes a good stock photo so I hear you about wondering what makes sales. I say that as background as I'm sure there are others who could give more specific/better advice than myself:

1) It's not just quantity, but quality that counts. The images have to either tell a story or illustrate a concept. I'm not sure the photos like "paint splatter" tell enough of a story. I suppose they could, but it's something to ask yourself when taking and then uploading photos.

2) Titles and keywords are important. The title "yellow flower" is not descriptive enough. Put the name - in english and it's scientific name - in the description. There are 3.2 million photos that come up when you search for the term "yellow flower" and 3.8 Million when you include other media as well. This will help people find your yellow flower.

3) As others might say, take photos of things that are unique to your part of the world. People/companies/etc might need a photo emblematic of India but are unable or unwilling to send someone half way around the world just to get one or two photos. One piece of advice I've read (and am trying to figure out how to do), is for travel photography, the photo should make you want to go there.

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1 hour ago, mandritoiu said:

No direct benefits, indeed. I'm not interested in pitching tutorials, I'm only interested in selling my stuff.

It just happened that the editors hired by SS to write the blog reached out to me and I agreed to answer their questions.

As I said, the only benefit I can think of is indirect: helping SS to promote their brand can help me as much it can help you @Alexandre Rotenberg

?

 I agree, thanks for your reply :) 

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On 6/28/2018 at 2:27 PM, Benedek Alpar said:

you need at least 10 pages to see daily sales

you can achieve daily sales with far less than that. As someone else said above, it's about quality, not quantity. An arbitrary number of pages in your port is just that... arbitrary.

If you've got a port with nothing selling, then you need to start shooting something else. Keep diversifying and uploading on a regular basis until you start to get sales. Then, dedicate some of the time you spend to focussing on adding images similar to the ones that sell and use the rest of the time to continue to diversify your port.

I do no promotion of my SS stuff at all. I also sell directly to clients, mostly framed prints, and do no promotion of that either although that's where the money is. It's just word of mouth. I think it makes a big difference if you are in this to make money. I'm glad I'm not. I'm in it to improve my ability with photography because I love that. Sales are, to me, an indication that I am doing something right with learning how to produce photography. The fact that I make money is just an added bonus but not the point.

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15 minutes ago, John Grummitt said:

As someone else said above, it's about quality, not quantity.

I hope I don't sound too nitpicky, but I was trying to imply a bit of both. Of course if one has 1,000 poorly exposed, poorly composed photos, they won't sell. If one has 1 great photo, there won't be a lot of sales either (One can have a great photo that illustrates autumn in central square  - or in some other location - people who are looking for photos that scream SUMMER!! aren't going to buy it.). To sell you need good photos, and some number and variety of them (I think your port fits the bill more than mine at the moment, though I do have a somewhat steady stream of downloads).

One doesn't necessarily need 1,000 photos to get a lot of sales. What that magic number is probably is dependent on a number of factors such as skill, knowledge of what makes a good stock photo - whether it's because they recognize things locally that will sell as photos, whether they can and do travel to areas  for whatever reason - and recognize there what's good.  Maybe even a bit of luck in terms of being in the right place at the right time  to get a good selling editorial photo or a photo of, say, the sun setting between a couple of buildings in NYC that they can call "NYC-henge" that they wouldn't have gotten at any other  time of day or day of the year.

Anyhow my caffeine levels are low so I won't babble on any further...

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On 6/28/2018 at 11:16 PM, Adam Gladstone said:

I've been on SS for a little less time than you have and know I still have lot's to learn about microstock and what makes a good stock photo so I hear you about wondering what makes sales. I say that as background as I'm sure there are others who could give more specific/better advice than myself:

1) It's not just quantity, but quality that counts. The images have to either tell a story or illustrate a concept. I'm not sure the photos like "paint splatter" tell enough of a story. I suppose they could, but it's something to ask yourself when taking and then uploading photos.

2) Titles and keywords are important. The title "yellow flower" is not descriptive enough. Put the name - in english and it's scientific name - in the description. There are 3.2 million photos that come up when you search for the term "yellow flower" and 3.8 Million when you include other media as well. This will help people find your yellow flower.

3) As others might say, take photos of things that are unique to your part of the world. People/companies/etc might need a photo emblematic of India but are unable or unwilling to send someone half way around the world just to get one or two photos. One piece of advice I've read (and am trying to figure out how to do), is for travel photography, the photo should make you want to go there.

This really is a very good advice and I'll try to implement and yes over the years I've learnt quite a few things about stock photography although I don't give much time to it because of my main line of work. And the "yellow flower" yeah it was when I did not knew what I was doing :P. And yes at this point still I've a long way to go.

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Don't know if it's just coincidence but my sales increased significantly after I started promoting my images in social media. 

However I only upload beautiful artistic images there just to drive traffic in to my shutterstock etc. profile. These images rarely sell but my theory is that more traffic in your profile makes search engines like you more ? Anyway.. who wants to look at boring stock images with "sold for the first time" captions on their feed? Not me..

Also I've got photo assignment from local harbour marketing people who found my images on twitter... and I'm only hobbyist...  And I've started to receive referral download payments too.

So I believe promoting does make a difference.
 

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Make sure you can be found. When I look at your beautiful first photo. Is it easy to find by a customer who wants a photo of Echo point Munnar, Kerala. But if someone wants a photo of boats on a lake in India, he won't find your photo. I first looked for a river, but saw on the internet that it was a lake.
I often look at the keywords that appear with similar photos.

When I look with the words: lake india boats docking

Not that it is perfect for me. It is difficult if English is not your native language.

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On 6/28/2018 at 4:27 AM, Benedek Alpar said:

I think in your case not the promotion is the problem, you have one page.  Build your port, you need at least 10 pages to see daily sales. Good luck.

"Ten Pages! No one told me that!"

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nah... that's rubbish. I had daily sales with only 1 page of images. Been on here for years and still only have 8 pages of images but sell every day

What Benedek means is 10 pages of mediocre images will mean you sell every day.

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