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Susan Kehoe

I have many bear pics, should I put them into sets?

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Susan. you asked for advice. well. I would seriously  move on with this obsession on Bears. I didn't see one that caught My eye as being commercially useful more than Once or twice. Just snapshots. Also. I hate to say "Boat coming in from Montauk Point NY USA August 18 2015" Both  are really Poorly done as if you weren't even looking through the viewfinder. The Horizons are crooked badly and they should have never been accepted and is one of the major Problems at this site and the review staff. what you need to do If making money here instead of just getting accepted is your goal.....Take the time and search whats here and see How High the bar is set on Uniqueness and quality before you just submit. ..................1.5 Million Images were added JUST LAST WEEK.

 

Good Luck. And putting them into sets?? Sorry.maybe time to think out of the Box.....???? theres 5.041 Pages times 100 of bears. time to make a change. This is a good selling Professional Bear Pic.

stock-photo-a-brown-bear-in-the-forest-big-brown-bear-bear-sits-on-a-rock-ursus-arctos-270172469.jpg

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Laurin - I was hoping you would comment, as I see you are a very active member and give your valued advice frequently. However, I always follow my gut, passion and love for black bears.  I was a member of SS almost 10 years ago, then stopped.  I resumed about a month ago adding more of my new photos.  Within a month, it was my bear pictures that sold and a few of Montauk.  Even if I don't sell anymore, this is my hobby when I am not fighting to protect our environment and animal advocacy.  

My bear photos and videos have been shown all over the world.  The New York Post was very generous with their payment when the published the bear on the hammock (photos attached).

Thank you, Laurin, for your advice!

New York Post 2006.jpg

susan book.JPG

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Susan I agree with Evgeniia, since you already have those photos accepted there is no harm to put them into set. Generally if someone search for bear photo in SS, just like Laurin said above there is a lot to choose from, so from this point of view it make no difference to have them in set. 

Sets are helpful for people who browse through your portfolio, as you give people option to look at certain category (like bears in your case) directly instead of scrolling through the whole portfolio.

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Susan, if you have access to black bears, and access to a good camera, and you love those bears, then go for it! Hone your craft, try to get a more shallow depth of field, watch your framing - and sooner or later you'll get a winner. I already like several of your bear shots. Maybe invest in a longer lens, so you can get closer without disturbing them. That'll also help with the shallow depth of field.

Be critical with your own images and don't upload everything you shoot. Laurin may sound harsh, but he's right about some of your pictures.

Also, work on your descriptions. "Feral kitten that was neutered and given to a good home" is a sweet story, but not something that helps a buyer find this shot. Much better would be "Close up of a small orange tabby kitten held in older woman's hands" or something like that. It will likely still drown in the many other cat pictures, but at least it'll have a chance to be found.

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Thank you Simone.  I welcome all advice. I appreciate you taking the time to critique my work.  I LOVE BLACK BEARS and that is why my portfolio is saturated with them!  This photograph was taken by Nancy Wegard, a NY Times photographer.  It was taken in 1999 of me and a wild bear named Samantha.  She passed on several years ago of old age.

 

sueSAMANTHATues.jpg

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Good for you - go with your heart.

I know that ports should be as varied as possible (I'm also guilty of this) - but if your passion is bears and wildlife, then stick with it and good luck.

I always put my stuff in sets, I have no idea if it makes any difference, but occasionally I'll see a spurt of the same set.

I love that photo of you and the wild bear - such a great experience and carry on with the great work you are doing.

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Wildlife certainly isn't my specialty, but a lot of your images look like your are using an on-camera flash? It makes things look less natural IMHO. The image that Laurin posted appears to be using only natural light, which is why its more pleasing to the eye. I could be wrong (wouldn't be the the first time.) 

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I have my wildlife images in a set. I don't know that it makes any difference. As a stock subject wildlife does not sell well for me. I get the occasional download but I'll never get rich off wildlife, heck since 2006 when I began submitting it won't even pay for a decent lens LOL. Like you photography would probably be considered a hobby since it's not my main source of income anymore. 

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23 hours ago, Sharon Day said:

I have my wildlife images in a set. I don't know that it makes any difference. As a stock subject wildlife does not sell well for me. I get the occasional download but I'll never get rich off wildlife, heck since 2006 when I began submitting it won't even pay for a decent lens LOL. Like you photography would probably be considered a hobby since it's not my main source of income anymore. 

Hi everyone. I guess you could say I specialize in wildlife photography (as that is what most of my portfolio contains). I do have my wildlife in sets - 5 in fact. Wolves, Animals, Birds of Prey, Horses and Domestic Animals. I've been doing this since 2005 and after many hiccups at the beginning found my passion of wildlife photography. I do what I would consider pretty good in selling those images. Between my husband and I and our 4 other stock sites we've kept our business alive and well, upgrading cameras about every 3 years and other equipment (computers, back-up drives etc) as needed. And manage one or two $2K photography trips per year.

The only suggestion I can give is to use latin names if you know them, and focus your keywords and descriptions on the critters, not necessarily the location. It's something I noticed in both Sharon's and Susan's portfolios. I don't know if it helps buyers find photos, but if a buyer is looking for a wolf photo, they'll probably search for "canis lupus" (if they are into the scientific aspect) "wolf" "wolves" "grey wolf" "gray wolf" or "timber wolf". Use every identifier of the animal you can think of or find. Another example: my photos of Ground Hogs are keyworded with "ground hog" "woodchuck" "whistle pig" "ground squirrel" "marmota monax" "rodent" and "chuckling" (for the babies and juveniles). It might seem a silly place to look, but Wikipedia has a wealth of information on details about animals. Is it an omnivore, herbivore, carnivore, crepuscular , nocturnal or cathemeral? Every detail helps.

Good luck!

P.S. Sharon - nice North Shore shots! Are you a native Minnesotan or did you just visit our fine state?

Edited by Holly Kuchera
added info

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4 hours ago, Holly Kuchera said:

Hi everyone. I guess you could say I specialize in wildlife photography (as that is what most of my portfolio contains). I do have my wildlife in sets - 5 in fact. Wolves, Animals, Birds of Prey, Horses and Domestic Animals. I've been doing this since 2005 and after many hiccups at the beginning found my passion of wildlife photography. I do what I would consider pretty good in selling those images. Between my husband and I and our 4 other stock sites we've kept our business alive and well, upgrading cameras about every 3 years and other equipment (computers, back-up drives etc) as needed. And manage one or two $2K photography trips per year.

The only suggestion I can give is to use latin names if you know them, and focus your keywords and descriptions on the critters, not necessarily the location. It's something I noticed in both Sharon's and Susan's portfolios. I don't know if it helps buyers find photos, but if a buyer is looking for a wolf photo, they'll probably search for "canis lupus" (if they are into the scientific aspect) "wolf" "wolves" "grey wolf" "gray wolf" or "timber wolf". Use every identifier of the animal you can think of or find. Another example: my photos of Ground Hogs are keyworded with "ground hog" "woodchuck" "whistle pig" "ground squirrel" "marmota monax" "rodent" and "chuckling" (for the babies and juveniles). It might seem a silly place to look, but Wikipedia has a wealth of information on details about animals. Is it an omnivore, herbivore, carnivore, crepuscular , nocturnal or cathemeral? Every detail helps.

Good luck!

P.S. Sharon - nice North Shore shots! Are you a native Minnesotan or did you just visit our fine state?

Holly, thanks on the tips for keywording the scientific names! I don't have many wildlife images, but I'll start doing that when I get them. 

Thanks on the North Shore photos. First time I had been there since 1961 when I was a kid vacationing with my parents. I researched it the best I could then we just took off and spent a few days up there. I loved it. I hope to go back again this spring or summer, and if not maybe fall. 

Sounds like you do well with the wildlife images. My landscapes sell much better than wildlife but I do have more of them. You have a gorgeous gallery of wildlife images! 

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