m2017

my camera broke, time for an upgrade but what to choose?

32 posts in this topic

Hi,

I had the unfortunate incident in the weekend when my D3300 was dropped and no longer works. As unhappy as I was at the time I realized how much I enjoyed shooting with it. Instead of looking to buy the same camera I am seeing this as an opportunity to upgrade.! I had only owned my cameras for a few months so still exploring.

I had bought a couple of lenses (35mm Nikon prime, Tamron 70-300mm) so not spent any mass amount on them but my question is this, as I have been looking into upgraded version, either D5500 or D7100/D7200 second hand I am trying to keep the price under £1000 and as I have not spent too much on lenses might also consider moving to Canon or Mirrorless and sell the lenses I have on ebay .

At the moment I don't have a particular subject for what I shoot. I am not into Weddings or Portraits, nor did I find myself climbing high mountains to get that great scenic shot (not yet anyway). However, Scenery/Landscapes do attract to me so will probably continue with that. Street photography I would feel awkward taking photos of random people and can be quite frowned upon in the UK. I would like to take the camera with me on city break holidays as I have a few trips lined up for later this year.

I keep finding myself watching reviews on the Mirrorless cameras but I think the low battery life would be quite frustrating. Also, the size of holding a bulkier DSLR feels more like you have a decent piece of kit in your hands.

Tough choice really so wondered if anyone has any advice ? Is Mirrorless worth the switch for a Amateur photographer ?

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Is Mirrorless worth the switch for a Amateur photographer ?

Sure. Why not? What's your budget? What do you like to shoot (that will determine both the body's capabilities and your lens choice). You have so many options available now in mirrorless that you're limited only by your budget. Sony gets high marks for its APS-C sensors. Other mirrorless cameras are micro four-thirds. Best thing to do is take an SD card into a camera store and see if you can test shoot some of their display cameras in store, then take the card home and compare the files on your computer. Some stores will let you do this, some won't, but it doesn't hurt to ask. Having noted all of that, an entry level DSLR is still going to be cheaper than an advanced mirrorless camera, and if you already have Nikon glass, you're that much farther ahead. 

Hope this helps and good luck with whatever you decide.

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Is Mirrorless worth the switch for a Amateur photographer ?

 

Of course Maybe not for client work But Remember. it ain't the camera My friend. It's your ability to capture stories If stock is what you wanna do. so a mirrorless is just fine. learn How to use it to it's fullest.

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1 hour ago, Chuck Wagner said:

The Nikon D7100 is a fine camera, and you can get a brand new one for under $700 at B&H Photo.  A brand new D7200 is under $1000.00.

Also agree, and you can keep the glass with Much More Options. 70-300 Tamron maybe not...LOL

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4 hours ago, Chuck Wagner said:

The Nikon D7100 is a fine camera, and you can get a brand new one for under $700 at B&H Photo.  A brand new D7200 is under $1000.00.

I really liked the D7100. My wife hated it. Still, I got some very nice shots with it for sale here. At $700 new, it's way more camera than even a D5600, and much cheaper than many mirrorless cameras. Put the money you save on the body into good Nikon glass, and you're way ahead of the game.  ;)

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m2017,

I don't know a thing about mirrorless cameras, Ebay or Craigslist so I can't pass along any advise about them. I like the fact that you have a 35mm prime lens, it's perfect for landscapes. Shoot multiple side by side shots in the vertical position to stitch into panoramas. Then you can crop the panos as needed. Another thing about landscapes: You don't have to climb mountains to get good compositions. In fact being in the mountains can be limiting as it is hard to photograph them if you are in them. Like trying to take a picture of a box while the camera is in the box. You can get a picture of a corner, bottom or a side but to shoot the whole box you have to get the camera out of it. I found this out the hard way when I lived 9000 feet above sea level in Colorado. Take a look at my website, http://www.mikenortonphotography.com, almost all of the landscape images posted there were shot from vantage points close to the road. Some where from the road! I had heart trouble and could not hike up into the mountains or down into the canyons so I learned how to make compositions from the places I could get to in my four-wheel-drive truck. I had a heart transplant and am now looking forward to climbing all of those mountains and checking out the bottom of all those canyons. 

As to the equipment buy what you like and what you can afford. If you switch to Canon be sure to get another 35mm prime lens.

 

And I would like to say that I agree with Leonard about this. Like I said I don't know about Ebay or Craigslist so leave out Ebay & Craigslist:

  • Second hand stuff tends be over-priced (Ebay + Craiglist) and you don't know what the camera as gone through.
  • But selling on Ebay is a good way to get rid of stuff.

The 2 statements remind me of what a photographer professor told me when I was in photography school: Never lend your equipment to another photographer, but always ask to borrow equipment from another photographer!

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You can't go wrong with the D7100/D7200. What's great about the camera is it will work with the older D series autofocus lenses. Most DX cameras will not. You can save a lot of money by buying used glass, and there's a lot of good D series lenses available.

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Suggest taking a look at full-frame cameras versus the 3/4 frame.  Full-frame digital is the closes to the old 35mm film/slide images and you may have discovered that folks have 'clipped' the top of the image with 3/4 frame because what you see in a 3/4 frame is not what you get.  Nikon and Canon lens will fit Nikon  and Canon digital cameras as they did with film cameras...it may be premature to 'sell' these lens before you select your next digital.

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On 7/10/2017 at 2:26 AM, m2017 said:

as I have been looking into upgraded version, either D5500 or D7100/D7200 second hand I am trying to keep the price under £1000

 

1 hour ago, Paul Richard Jones said:

 

Suggest taking a look at full-frame cameras versus the 3/4 frame.

 

I think it would be more helpful to offer advice based on the person's stated budget and immediate needs rather than trying to upsell them into a system they don't want or need now. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the Nikon D7100 or D7200, especially for landscapes, where the lack of an AA filter gives images from these cameras more sharpness. I think if you had ever shot either of these cameras, you would know that.  -_-

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Sorry.  I appreciate full-frame...neither Nikon D7100 or D7200 fills that requirement.  Given that Nikon's D850 is on the horizon, D650, D750, D800, D800e, D810, D810a will be pushed downward in pricing. While the D810 exceeds the 1000-pound sterling of m2017, the D650 and F750 may very well be in the planned budget.  Why would I want to shoot 3/4 frame when the end results are marginal compared to full-frame images? Let  m2017 decide for himself whether a full-frame is in the cards vs. marginalizing his abilities to develop his skills with a full-frame vs. 3/4-frame.

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42 minutes ago, Paul Richard Jones said:

I appreciate full-frame...neither Nikon D7100 or D7200 fills that requirement.

Maybe not for you. I currently shoot 3 full-frame cameras: Nikon D610, Canon 5D MkIII, and 5D MkIV. I have also shot the Canon 5DSR and 1DX. I also shoot (and have shot) the Canon 7D, 7D MkII, Rebel T3i, Nikon D5200, D7100, and D500. All of them APS-C cameras. Do you know what I have found? In good light with good glass, there's not a dime's worth of difference between them. Where the more expensive full-frame cameras differ (besides controls, price, and sensor) is their ability to record acceptably clean images in low light (with the notable exception of the 5DSR.) I have images for sale on SS and other stock sites from all of these cameras. All of them. 

In my opinion, an investment in good glass is better than spending money on a body that will be obsolete in 3 years or less. The D7200 is an excellent camera. Thinking about getting one myself for my 60th birthday, just because I can. It is definitely capable of recording excellent images, especially for stock. Anyone who doesn't think so has never shot with an APS-C camera. 

On a side note, I've seen your port. There's nothing in it that couldn't have been shot equally well with a D7100/D7200, higher resolution of the D810 notwithstanding.

We're talking penny stock here, not commercial work. 

1 hour ago, Paul Richard Jones said:

Let  m2017 decide for himself whether a full-frame is in the cards vs. marginalizing his abilities to develop his skills with a full-frame vs. 3/4-frame.

I have no problem letting anyone do whatever they want, but I think you're not considering all the facts. You suggest full-frame because that's all you've apparently shot. Fine. But your advice is lacking because your perspective is so limited. And I think it's hubris, not to mention effete snobbery, to suggest that people can only develop their skills as a photographer based on a single type of camera. Quite frankly, anyone shooting only medium or large format cameras would probably be laughing at such a notion right now. Were they to take your position, I'm sure they would argue your skills are being marginalized by shooting a full-frame DSLR!

Again, perspective!

I hope anyone reading this who is shooting with an APS-C, Micro four-thirds, 1" sensor, or even a cell phone camera will come away with a very important lesson: it's not about the camera, it's about YOU! It's about your vision, your creativity, your ambition, and your passion. Go make good pictures with whatever you shoot, and don't let anyone ever tell you your work isn't good enough just because you're shooting with anything less than a full-frame camera! Because, at the end of the day, no buyer cares what camera you used, only that your photos inspired them enough to buy them.

Now go shoot pictures with whatever you have and have fun!

IMHO.

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2 minutes ago, Phil Lowe said:

I hope anyone reading this who is shooting with an APS-C, Micro four-thirds, 1" sensor, or even a cell phone camera will come away with a very important lesson: it's not about the camera, it's about YOU! It's about your vision, your creativity, your ambition, and your passion. Go make good pictures with whatever you shoot, and don't let anyone ever tell you your work isn't good enough just because you're shooting with anything less than a full-frame camera! Because, at the end of the day, no buyer cares what camera you used, only that your photos inspired them enough to buy them.

Now go shoot pictures with whatever you have and have fun!

Perfect reply, Phil. Not much else can be added.

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Phil Lowe and Jim in SC have made my suggestion for m2017 to review full-frame camera's.  "This reply

I think it would be more helpful to offer advice based on the person's stated budget and immediate needs rather than trying to upsell them into a system they don't want or need now." into a snark.  There is nothing in my original post that 'condemn' m2017's as this sentence infers: "and don't let anyone ever tell you your work isn't good enough just because you're shooting with anything less than a full-frame camera!"

The insertion into the reply of 'upsell them' was not in my suggestion...only to look at full-frame vs. 3/4-frame. The decision from m2017 remains with him/her.  Neither of you can make that call for him/her as to actually what m2017 needs or wants beyond what was in m2017's original request.  The balance of your post is Ad Hominem regarding myself.

Edited by Paul Richard Jones
Clarification

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1 hour ago, Paul Richard Jones said:

The insertion into the reply of 'upsell them' was not in my suggestion...only to look at full-frame vs. 3/4-frame.

Well, sir, I respectfully disagree. In the original post, the author of that post wrote this:

On 7/10/2017 at 2:26 AM, m2017 said:

as I have been looking into upgraded version, either D5500 or D7100/D7200 second hand I am trying to keep the price under £1000

So, in completely ignoring that the author was only interested in "either D5500 or D7100/D7200 second hand" or a mirrorless camera, nevertheless you suggested he look into a full-frame camera, something that - if s/he were interested in, probably would've made that known up front. 

Furthermore, this isn't the first time you've tried to steer someone into something they explicitly omitted from their questions about new/upgrading cameras:

In that thread, despite the author explicitly stating that they were new to photography and only had the money for a Canon Rebel T6 with kit lens, you proceeded to tell them they should look into a full-frame camera, even indicating that you knew such a camera would cost more, but - again - implying that they would be much happier with the results, completely ignoring their stated budget! And in this thread, you even went so far as to suggest that a crop-frame camera would "marginalize" their "skills" as photographers! Seriously, I haven't heard anything so snobbish and condescending in a very long time.

You disparage third-party lenses on Canon or Nikon bodies, calling them "cobbled together...Frankensteins", indicating you have no experience with either APS-C bodies or third-party glass, and then, when called out on your lack of perspective, you want to play the victim card? Sorry. Passive-aggressive ain't gonna' play well here.

You have stated that you have experience with Nikon, going back to the F3. No Canon experience and, apparently, no APS-C experience of any kind. 

On the other hand, I offered my CV with both Nikon and Canon full-frame and APS-C cameras, yet somehow you want us to believe that your experience with a single camera brand and type of sensor authorizes you to "suggest" to others that their skills won't progress with a crop-frame camera??? LOL!

My advice to you, with all due respect, would be try to meet people where they are when they ask for advice, not "suggest" moving them up to a format they may not need or cannot afford. And if you can't make recommendations based on what they want - rather than what you want to see them use - perhaps it would be best to offer no advice at all. No one needs to read that they are somehow less-skilled as a photographer because they use less-than a full-frame camera. Many, many photographers with excellent ports here certainly put that ridiculous view to rest a long time ago.

IMHO.

 

 

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And for anyone else reading this, here's a little game I like to play called "Full-frame vs. Crop-sensor." It's very simple: indicate which image was shot with a crop-sensor versus full-frame. Five images. You don't have to reply here, this is just something I want people to think about.

1. crop or full?

stock-photo-close-up-of-a-female-anna-s-

2. crop or full?

stock-photo-male-house-sparrow-passer-do

3. crop or full?

stock-photo-blue-jay-cyanocitta-cristata

4. crop or full?

stock-photo-male-house-finch-haemorhous-

5. crop or full?

stock-photo-male-house-finch-haemorhous-

If you can't tell the difference, how much difference can it possibly make???

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2 hours ago, Phil Lowe said:

Well, sir, I respectfully disagree. In the original post, the author of that post wrote this:

So, in completely ignoring that the author was only interested in "either D5500 or D7100/D7200 second hand" or a mirrorless camera, nevertheless you suggested he look into a full-frame camera, something that - if s/he were interested in, probably would've made that known up front. 

Furthermore, this isn't the first time you've tried to steer someone into something they explicitly omitted from their questions about new/upgrading cameras:

In that thread, despite the author explicitly stating that they were new to photography and only had the money for a Canon Rebel T6 with kit lens, you proceeded to tell them they should look into a full-frame camera, even indicating that you knew such a camera would cost more, but - again - implying that they would be much happier with the results, completely ignoring their stated budget! And in this thread, you even went so far as to suggest that a crop-frame camera would "marginalize" their "skills" as photographers! Seriously, I haven't heard anything so snobbish and condescending in a very long time.

You disparage third-party lenses on Canon or Nikon bodies, calling them "cobbled together...Frankensteins", indicating you have no experience with either APS-C bodies or third-party glass, and then, when called out on your lack of perspective, you want to play the victim card? Sorry. Passive-aggressive ain't gonna' play well here.

You have stated that you have experience with Nikon, going back to the F3. No Canon experience and, apparently, no APS-C experience of any kind. 

On the other hand, I offered my CV with both Nikon and Canon full-frame and APS-C cameras, yet somehow you want us to believe that your experience with a single camera brand and type of sensor authorizes you to "suggest" to others that their skills won't progress with a crop-frame camera??? LOL!

My advice to you, with all due respect, would be try to meet people where they are when they ask for advice, not "suggest" moving them up to a format they may not need or cannot afford. And if you can't make recommendations based on what they want - rather than what you want to see them use - perhaps it would be best to offer no advice at all. No one needs to read that they are somehow less-skilled as a photographer because they use less-than a full-frame camera. Many, many photographers with excellent ports here certainly put that ridiculous view to rest a long time ago.

IMHO.

 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Paul Richard Jones said:

Phil Lowe: More Ad Hominem. 

Nope. I have no doubt that you really believe that someone's growth as a photographer will be stunted by using a crop-sensor camera. I also find that view condescending, snobbish, and incorrect in light of the many fine photographers here shooting and selling images made with crop-sensor and MFT cameras. But hey, feel free to believe anything you wish. I'm just trying to provide a different perspective. 

Figure out which of my images (above) were crop or full-frame? Because if you can't, don't feel bad. No one else can tell the difference either.

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Phil Lowe:  Again, you are making this into an Ad Hominem issue with me.  I made a suggestion to look at full-frame vs. 3/4 frame when a person is looking to up-grade their camera and you proceeded to turn my suggestions into a nefarious deed as a "...condescending, snobbish, and incorrect..." issue.  To take a point in your above post, "I'm just trying to provide a different perspective."

I, too, suggested a different perspective. 

Phil, enough of this back and forth.  We are both up late.  Tomorrow will be another day.

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1 hour ago, Paul Richard Jones said:

you proceeded to turn my suggestions into a nefarious deed as a "...condescending, snobbish, and incorrect..." issue.

No, you did that when you wrote this:

Quote

Let  m2017 decide for himself whether a full-frame is in the cards vs. marginalizing his abilities to develop his skills with a full-frame vs. 3/4-frame.

Suggesting that someone's "abilities to develop his skills with a full-frame vs. 3/4-frame", as though full-frame is the only way to develop one's skills as a photographer, is simply incorrect. I see you edited the post where you wrote that and removed that remark, cited above. Good. But repeatedly "suggesting" to people looking for crop-sensor bodies that they should - in one of your posts cited above - spend more money to be "happier with the results" ignores their stated needs. Seriously, if spending more money on camera gear would make them "happier with the results", why not "suggest" medium format???

Here's the brutally honest truth about the whole full-frame vs. crop sensor debate, and why I strongly believe people should just relax about crop sensor cameras! 

 

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