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cpaulfell

Photographer Shoots Formula 1 With 104-Year-Old Camera

38 posts in this topic

17 minutes ago, Patrick Cooper said:

Incidentally, the medium format camera I used (the Koni Omega Rapid) was also intended for use with press photographers. But I believe the timing was wrong - when the Koni was released, 35mm started to become popular in press photography. Ive also used twin lens reflex cameras (another favourite among press photographers.) 

Mike, when you were shooting large format sheet film, did you ever use the technique of making two identical exposures of the same subject / same composition and angle etc? Ive heard that could be used as extra insurance for getting an acceptably exposed image. The idea being to get the first of those two exposed frames developed and then examine the results. If the film turns out to be properly exposed, then the second frame will be developed as normal. However, if the first frame is underexposed or overexposed, then the development of the second frame will be adjusted accordingly. Sort of like doing a clip test with roll film (serving the same purpose.)

Actually easily done.Rollei took over Mid 50's and the rest was History But many euro Guys were making History then with 35. Cartier Bresson. late 40's. I learned in JR High with a speed Graphic. My dad Gave Me a Leica when I was 16. And I had no clue what to do with this "Baby" camera. it seemed Like a toy to me. and I've told this story before. I traded the Leica with a friend for a sweater. 49 Years later My Dad never forgot that Mistake. a Perfect M1 with a Leather case. He looked up to me on his death bed and before he died he Looked at me and said. "The Camera"............he remembered. But he was a very cool Guy. he said. "You Learn the Zone System and I'll Build you a darkroom" I did and he Did. and I still use the zone system.

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You traded a Leica for a sweater? I never would have seen that coming. Though I could see that if you had gotten accustomed to large format, a 35mm camera may seem like a toy, even a Leica. Interesting perspective. Though I'm glad it all worked out anyway with the building of the darkroom.

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11 hours ago, Patrick Cooper said:

Mike, when you were shooting large format sheet film, did you ever use the technique of making two identical exposures of the same subject / same composition and angle etc? Ive heard that could be used as extra insurance for getting an acceptably exposed image. The idea being to get the first of those two exposed frames developed and then examine the results. If the film turns out to be properly exposed, then the second frame will be developed as normal. However, if the first frame is underexposed or overexposed, then the development of the second frame will be adjusted accordingly. Sort of like doing a clip test with roll film (serving the same purpose.)

That is exactly the way I shoot landscapes with the 4x5. I shoot like this because the lighting can change very quickly when shooting outside, there are multiple procedures to follow between shots and I want to end up with 2 identical 4x5 transparencies. I do not have to push or pull (that's what the adjustments you mentioned are called) many exposures but I have occasionally use one or the other. 

In the studio after the lighting was set and metered, the filter factor and bellows factor were measured and applied to the exposure nothing would change so I could shoot away knowing that all the exposed sheets would be exposed properly. Besides we were selling the 8x10 transparencies after they were processed. The customer would not buy 2 if he only ordered 1 so shooting a backup cut into the profit. All I had to worry about was the guy messing up the film during processing . . . but that guy was me.

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Laurin and Mike, I remember that long trek thru the canyon. I was so out of breath, I had to stop for a cigarette break.

It was a good time with good people!

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John, Thanks again for waiting while I caught my breath me on the way out! That was with my old heart, hopefully I won't have that problem with my new one!

Mike

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14 hours ago, Patrick Cooper said:

Clyde Butcher does nice work with large format. Really makes the most of the natural wilderness that surrounds him in Florida.

You got that right and he like Rodney Lough Jr. photographs with an 8x10 inch camera.

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