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DSLR zoom? help acquisition


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yes but how do I see witch is better, zoom in as much as I can and look for blur or out of focus? 

Do you mean zoom in with a zoom lens when you are photographing or using the tool in Photoshop that makes the image larger on your screen?

 

I agree with what Dave said.

 

What I think you should do is use AF-Single on an images of a car and then use AF-Dynamic Area on another image of the same car from the same spot and then evaluate them in Photoshop to see which gave you the best results. Until you fully understand how your camera functions and the fundamentals of photography you should approach each shooting situation as a test. Think of it like this: I could use X camera function or Y camera function in this situation but I don't know which will work the best. So shoot both X and Y and study the images to see which is best. X and Y could be auto focus vs. manual focus, wide angle lens vs. normal lens, maximum depth of field vs. shallow depth of field, focusing on on a subject close to the camera vs. focusing on a subject a litter farther from the camera, AF-Single vs. AF-Dynamic Area and so on. Each time you find that X works better than Y write it down so you will remember it the next time you are in that situation. Then try to find a shooting situation where Y works better than X. 

 

Like Dave, Laurin, Jeff, and others have pointed out again and again photography is a learning process there is no magic camera setting, filter or accessory that will make your images instantly better. Only time and effort will do that.

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First of all if you are thinking of getting a DSLR forget about the 4X, 10X etc zoom. That is one of the problems with point and shoot cameras and that is the optics are often stretched to the limits.

Sabin, A couple of things; First ANY lens that is a zoom due to the principles of mechanics and optics will have some chromatic aberrations, and alignment problems. They suffer from the need to have

Sabin I have been doing photography for 45 years now. My business partner Laurin has been doing it for over 50 years. When we do our workshops or go out shooting there are times we carry a great deal

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thanks, no , I meant zooming on the camera screen LCD ... because I won't have a computer or laptop with me 

That would be a good start but to evaluate the images as best as possible I think that opening them in Photoshop and viewing them next to each other will tell you more. Like I said use this as a test, photograph each car with as many techniques as possible and pick the best technique later on a computer. Then you will know what worked best when you shoot at the car show next year.

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yay , 10 out of 14 photos in my latest batch were approved on the most dreaded microstock site : Shutterstock ! :D

 

@ a monastery in Transylvania. 

 

so it''s not impossible 

 

also what do you think should I go for AF-Single or AF-Dynamic Area, the cars do move some of them but really slow on their platforms. Don''t know what to say about the models next to them :) 

This magic word Transylvania.... Croocked horizon in many images :)

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hello guys, I need some help, I recently took some photos of an old typewriting machine and I use Full Auto Mode, when I got home I instantly noticed these 2 photos out of focus at the top where the brand name is, so I checked the settings and it is Auto Area AF on Full Auto Mode, and I need to change it to single point manually every time, of course that is not an option, so what happened , the camera focused on what it thought best and took the shot? I don't want these errors on important pictures, but what can I do, should I never shoot on Auto if I am in a hurry or if I hand over the camera to someone else ? Finally at the last picture it focused the entire typewriter. 

 

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hello guys, I need some help, I recently took some photos of an old typewriting machine and I use Full Auto Mode, when I got home I instantly noticed these 2 photos out of focus at the top where the brand name is, so I checked the settings and it is Auto Area AF on Full Auto Mode, and I need to change it to single point manually every time, of course that is not an option, so what happened , the camera focused on what it thought best and took the shot? I don't want these errors on important pictures, but what can I do, should I never shoot on Auto if I am in a hurry or if I hand over the camera to someone else ? Finally at the last picture it focused the entire typewriter. 

 

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Remember that focus is not just about what method or matrix of focusing you used. There is still you the user. If you did not use a proper tripod or your hand holding technique is not good, or you depress the shutter incorrectly you focus can be off. The camera does not do it all. You , the user are the biggest aspect of getting a properly focused image.

 

As far as the images go we don't know what your aperture was so that could be an issue. Your shutter speed can also be an issue as far as focus goes. It seems like you are still stuck on this auto thing and letting the camera do all your thinking.

 

You say you are using auto area AF. Not sure exactly what that will get you, would have to check the manual. For me I usually always have mine set up for single point and I just position the point on where I want my focus to be.

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The camera has auto focus sensors. You can set the one(s) you want your camera to use when focusing. Your camera is going to auto focus on the spot(s) that the sensor(s) is/are covering. That is why Dave is suggesting that you to "set up for single point and I just position the point on where I want my focus to be." That way you only use one sensor. 

 

Now look at your typewriter; it has two - 90 degree angles that are opposing each other. Starting at the top you have a relatively flat surface from the chrome roller to the ruler then you have the first 90 degree angle that takes you down to the keys, at that point you gave another 90 degree angle that takes you to the front edge of the keys. 

 

Draw an imaginary line down from the top of the chrome roller to the metal edge in front of the space bar. The middle of this imaginary line is where you need to focus your lens. The middle of that line is probably somewhere over the arms that swing up to type the letter and behind the ruler. That means that there is nothing but air for you to use as your focusing point. And auto focus will not focus on this air, it will focus on the arms that swing up to type the letter or the ruler because they are right in front of or under the spot that is on the imaginary line. So what’s a photographer to do?

 

Try this, place something, a small object, inside the typewriter, probably on the arms that swing up to type the letter that is also on the imaginary line from the top of the chrome roller to the metal edge in front of the space bar. Then focus, either manually or auto focus, on that object. If you choose auto focus this is where you turn the auto focus off. Now remove the object that you use as a focusing aid. When you look through the viewfinder you may find that everything is out of focus. Don’t let this bother you. Set a small aperture say f-16 or f-22 and find the corresponding shutter speed for the light and ISO set in the camera. If your camera has a depth of field preview button this is where you press it and see if everything comes into focus at the f-stop you chose. If not increase the distance from the camera to the typewriter a little, place your object back in the typewriter and start over.

 

A shooting angle somewhere between your first and third images of the typewriter might be better than either angle that we see here.

 

Remember that when you tilt the camera down you are also tilting the depth of field. So if you aim the camera down at a 45-degree angle the depth of field will also be changed to 45 degrees. It will still be 1/3 in front of the point of focus and 2/3 behind the point of focus.

 

Try this and see what you get but remember that depth of field decreases, even at f-16 and f-22, when you photograph a small part of the universe so you might not be able to make all parts of the typewriter sharp without making the typewriter smaller in the image.

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As far as the images go we don't know what your aperture was so that could be an issue. Your shutter speed can also be an issue as far as focus goes. It seems like you are still stuck on this auto thing and letting the camera do all your thinking.

 

I am still using Full Auto Mode ( as I call it ) because I don't consider myself an expert or experienced enough to use P S A or M only so I use these modes also but I also use Auto Mode so I don't get every single picture wrong, I have my settings on Single Point AF on all modes except Auto where I cannot change it. 

 

 

Try this, place something, a small object, inside the typewriter, probably on the arms that swing up to type the letter that is also on the imaginary line from the top of the chrome roller to the metal edge in front of the space bar. Then focus, either manually or auto focus, on that object. If you choose auto focus this is where you turn the auto focus off. Now remove the object that you use as a focusing aid. When you look through the viewfinder you may find that everything is out of focus. Don’t let this bother you. Set a small aperture say f-16 or f-22 and find the corresponding shutter speed for the light and ISO set in the camera. If your camera has a depth of field preview button this is where you press it and see if everything comes into focus at the f-stop you chose. If not increase the distance from the camera to the typewriter a little, place your object back in the typewriter and start over.

 

 

There was actually something like that between the letters and I removed it :) 

 

Full auto mode is probably your first problem. Why let the camera make all of the decisions for you?

 

Using "auto area AF" is basically setting it up so the camera can pick any AF point it wants. It will often focus on the closest object which may not (likely isn't) what you want the focus to be on. Best bet is to have it on single point AF for the most accurate AF (i.e. if you put the focus point on what you want to be in focus it probably will be). Some of the newer camera bodies out there have EXTREMELY sophisticated AF systems. My 7DII took me a while to even figure out what my options were. I haven't got it figured out as far as which setup is best for which circumstance. I usually keep it pretty basic to be honest.

 

Seriously, you need to spend some time and read the manual and figure out what your camera is capable of. Trial and error without even knowing the basics is going to leave you confused.

 

Start off really simple (maybe even manual focus and exposure). Figure out the basics then start changing things one at a time. Walk before you run.

Like I said I just use Auto when I am not confident enough on myself to use only the other modes. Thanks for the input, I wish there was an option to leave everything on Auto and choose instead of Auto Area Focus - Single Point. 

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I am still using Full Auto Mode ( as I call it ) because I don't consider myself an expert or experienced enough to use P S A or M only so I use these modes also but I also use Auto Mode so I don't get every single picture wrong, I have my settings on Single Point AF on all modes except Auto where I cannot change it. 

 

There was actually something like that between the letters and I removed it :)

 

Like I said I just use Auto when I am not confident enough on myself to use only the other modes. Thanks for the input, I wish there was an option to leave everything on Auto and choose instead of Auto Area Focus - Single Point. 

You do not have to be an expert to use A S P or M. Just using Auto for everything is just getting something that may work for the current situation. Take some time to experiment. Put the camera in Aperture mode and take some shots. Remember in that mode you select the aperture according to the situation and lighting conditions. Set it, take a shot and look at it. If it is too dark, use a larger aperture and take another shot and look at it. Do the same with the other modes as well. You are never going to learn if you do not try these things.

 

Remember, all the shots you take are free. It costs you nothing. It is not like film where if you mess up it costs you money. It is all free so just do it. The more you do it the easier it becomes on knowing what settings to use. But you will never get there if all you do is put that thing on auto. Want to really learn fast? Go get a film camera. Trust me, when it starts costing money you learn quick. You need to know the basics. The only way to learn about those is to read and do it. So stop trying to get a good shot from an auto setting when it is doomed from the beginning due to the type of shot you are taking. If you want to see what auto does go outside and take a shot of a general landscape. Something where things like depth of field do not come into play like your typewriter shots.

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You do not have to be an expert to use A S P or M. Just using Auto for everything is just getting something that may work for the current situation. Take some time to experiment. Put the camera in Aperture mode and take some shots. Remember in that mode you select the aperture according to the situation and lighting conditions. Set it, take a shot and look at it. If it is too dark, use a larger aperture and take another shot and look at it. Do the same with the other modes as well. You are never going to learn if you do not try these things.

 

Remember, all the shots you take are free. It costs you nothing. It is not like film where if you mess up it costs you money. It is all free so just do it. The more you do it the easier it becomes on knowing what settings to use. But you will never get there if all you do is put that thing on auto. Want to really learn fast? Go get a film camera. Trust me, when it starts costing money you learn quick. You need to know the basics. The only way to learn about those is to read and do it. So stop trying to get a good shot from an auto setting when it is doomed from the beginning due to the type of shot you are taking. If you want to see what auto does go outside and take a shot of a general landscape. Something where things like depth of field do not come into play like your typewriter shots.

It could not have been said better!

Till you know what you are doing treat every set up as an experiment, try this, try that and then try the other thing then see which worked the best!

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Sabin. Question for you....Do you Know what makes AF work. Answer is contrast..vertical Contrast. without contrast the lenses will grind away Looking for it and won't lock on to anything. That means Light. You try to shoot something with Nothing but grey. It will just grind away searching. another reason why we use "fast" glass Fast means it allows more Light to come in and focus is faster and locking On is better.

 

Force yourself to shoot manual, It will Teach you to see. And "THATS" what our job is. Anyone now days can go take a picture. But Can you "MAKE" a picture. When you can, Thats a Beginning to be free to create. you let that Little box think for you, your Pictures will Look Like it. Nothing wrong with AF, you just have to know when and why and all the variations. Most cameras are a 100 times smarter than the folks who use them. Your a smart young man. Spend the time, do the work...It will Pay off. Trust me.

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Sabin. Question for you....Do you Know what makes AF work. Answer is contrast..vertical Contrast. without contrast the lenses will grind away Looking for it and won't lock on to anything. That means Light. You try to shoot something with Nothing but grey. It will just grind away searching. another reason why we use "fast" glass Fast means it allows more Light to come in and focus is faster and locking On is better.

 

Force yourself to shoot manual, It will Teach you to see. And "THATS" what our job is. Anyone now days can go take a picture. But Can you "MAKE" a picture. When you can, Thats a Beginning to be free to create. you let that Little box think for you, your Pictures will Look Like it. Nothing wrong with AF, you just have to know when and why and all the variations. Most cameras are a 100 times smarter than the folks who use them. Your a smart young man. Spend the time, do the work...It will Pay off. Trust me.

No , I did not know that about AF.  Thanks for the compliment, hopefully I will come back with some good photos to share ;) less than 2 weeks , Hype ! 

 

yay, my typewriter made it on the dreader Shutterstock :) 

cp5xk.jpg

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