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Are you still saking about settings for the auto show?

 

An auto show in a convention center is not a place to get good images of cars. The lights are often high above the cars which makes lighting fixtures into hard light sources. The white balance of the convention center's lights often are not the same so there is almost always mixed lighting sources. The lights are usually dim compared to sunlight. And then there are the 1000s of other people who are attending the auto show and, wouldn't you know it, they all want to look at the same car you want to photograph . . . at the same time. If the images are for your own pleasure then I would say run the ISO up so that you can hand hold the camera somewhere around 1/125 of a second at f5.6. But don't expect any of the images to have the quality that will allow you to make much more than a 5x7 inch print and realize that they will not not be sellable even as Editorial. If you want something better I suggest a tripod mounted camera, ISO 100, f8 or f11 and find the shutter speed that works. Get there early before the crowds and work fast.

 

 

The number of focus points is next to meaningless, since most of the time I use a single center point for 99% of my work, the more points you have the sloppier your work ethic!

My D300 and D800 has 51, whoopdy do! how often do I use them - virtually never!

I didn't even use the 5 AF points on my D70s or the D100 or the 11 on the D200

 

Save yourself some money, buy a used D200 on ebay, (you can get one for a couple of hundred dollars) make sure it has low shutter actuations, get a good lens, read the manual and learn how to use a DSLR.

thanks guys, I will let you know how it went when I get back, it is a long time still 1 month to go but I already got my plane tickets and hotel. 

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First of all if you are thinking of getting a DSLR forget about the 4X, 10X etc zoom. That is one of the problems with point and shoot cameras and that is the optics are often stretched to the limits.

Sabin, A couple of things; First ANY lens that is a zoom due to the principles of mechanics and optics will have some chromatic aberrations, and alignment problems. They suffer from the need to have

Sabin I have been doing photography for 45 years now. My business partner Laurin has been doing it for over 50 years. When we do our workshops or go out shooting there are times we carry a great deal

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I have a problem, I forgot how to make water smoke like, when I make a slow shutter speed the aperture adjusts but when I take a shot, it is full white because too much light gets to the sensor, so how to create those water or lights blur photos?

 

Currently watching this :

I like to do these in manual mode. Some tutorials say to do it in shutter priority but I like the control of being able to use my own settings. Start with a slower shutter speed of about 1/30th of a second. Choose a smaller aperture ( start with 1/16th) to compensate for the additional light entering the camera. Take the shot and make adjustments as necessary. You may need to add a neutral density filter to help block some of the light to get right effect. The slower your shutter speed the softer the water becomes. You will need a tripod for this.

 

Here is one of mine that I did in Yosemite

 

stock-photo-long-exposure-of-small-rapid

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This whole thread topic and the changes is highly unusual. First it's about a zoom lens, then suddenly it's a tripod or editorial or something else. Then it's how to take a slow exposure so the water is blurred. DSLR Zoom? Wasn't there a TV show called LOST where the plot just kind of evolved and morphed, but never had any true direction? :)

 

To answer a question which doesn't seem to have been answered clearly - or I missed it -  Editorial for Stock/Microstock is different from Editorial/News/Educational for legal requirements. Micro makes their own rules which are more restrictive than legal constraints. If we want to sell, we need to meet the Microstock rules. Legally we don't need all the same permissions that we need for agencies.

 

Auto show, public event or whatever, if you want to license the images, on stock sites, you will need to meet the agency requirements. It's that simple. Law aside, the agencies make their own rules which are more stringent than the actual laws and restrictions. There's no argument, they make the rules for their licenses.

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I like to do these in manual mode. Some tutorials say to do it in shutter priority but I like the control of being able to use my own settings. Start with a slower shutter speed of about 1/30th of a second. Choose a smaller aperture ( start with 1/16th) to compensate for the additional light entering the camera. Take the shot and make adjustments as necessary. You may need to add a neutral density filter to help block some of the light to get right effect. The slower your shutter speed the softer the water becomes. You will need a tripod for this.

 

Here is one of mine that I did in Yosemite

 

stock-photo-long-exposure-of-small-rapid

 

 

This whole thread topic and the changes is highly unusual. First it's about a zoom lens, then suddenly it's a tripod or editorial or something else. Then it's how to take a slow exposure so the water is blurred. DSLR Zoom? Wasn't there a TV show called LOST where the plot just kind of evolved and morphed, but never had any true direction? :)

 

To answer a question which doesn't seem to have been answered clearly - or I missed it -  Editorial for Stock/Microstock is different from Editorial/News/Educational for legal requirements. Micro makes their own rules which are more restrictive than legal constraints. If we want to sell, we need to meet the Microstock rules. Legally we don't need all the same permissions that we need for agencies.

 

Auto show, public event or whatever, if you want to license the images, on stock sites, you will need to meet the agency requirements. It's that simple. Law aside, the agencies make their own rules which are more stringent than the actual laws and restrictions. There's no argument, they make the rules for their licenses.

David, I understand I need slow shutter speed but what do I do so don''t get a white screen again with the apperture close it as much as possible?

 

You want to know what I learned since on SS? If they do not have not even one picture of what you are submitting, quality, focus, the law,  is irrelevant they just take it. If they don''t have anything on that subject. 

 

P.S well yes I could have made 3-4 separate threads. 

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David, I understand I need slow shutter speed but what do I do so don''t get a white screen again with the apperture close it as much as possible?

 

You want to know what I learned since on SS? If they do not have not even one picture of what you are submitting, quality, focus, the law,  is irrelevant they just take it. If they don''t have anything on that subject. 

 

P.S well yes I could have made 3-4 separate threads. 

I told you what you had to do. I said not only will you have to use a slower shutter speed but MUST ALSO use an aperture that will be small enough not to over expose the image. Remember me telling you long ago that when shooting manual shutter speed and aperture have a direct bearing on each other. Change one you will need to change the other to get a properly exposed image.

 

There are no specific settings to do this. It depends on how smokey you want the water to be. Slow shutter speed will give you some. A very slow shutter speed will give you more. This is where understanding the principles of photography come into play. You need to know what to do with your settings to get the desired result. The camera will not do this for you in this type of shot.

 

So for a shot like this you may need to take a few shots to get it right. Start with as I said at f16 with a shutter speed of 1/30th. Take the shot and look at it. If it isn't right change the settings. If you have a white screen where the shot is totally over exposed then you need to do what? You either must reduce the amount of light coming into the camera by using a smaller aperture and/or a faster shutter speed.

 

As I also said in my other answer the conditions may be such that you will not be able to get a properly exposed shot without the use of a neutral density filter to block out more of the light. You as the photographer must learn these things to get the kind of shots you want. It is about being a photographer and not just using a setting on your camera. Know what each setting on your camera does and how things will be different if you change one of them. Those are some of the principles of photography that you need to learn.

 

Also just Google Photography smokey water or something like that. You will find tons of information.

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This thing Laurin says about the slow zooms and to stick with a prime lens and simple camera in the beginning, rings true to me.

 

I struggled with my kit lens and another stupid slow nikon plastic zoom for nearly one year before I had it. One day, and I still don't know why I did this, I was so frustrated that I got rid of everything except for the camera. With the money I bought a 35 mm prime, and started using just that. I did this for one year.

 

Simplifying allowed me to concentrate on the basics and to learn some principles a little faster, and with that prime lens I started getting some good quality images more consistently. And since I could trust the lens to do its job and got acquainted with its limits, I had more time to concentrate on trying to fix my own mistakes. 

 

I know it is just a personal account and it may not be valid for others, but a good prime lens, a basic DSLR and a good tripod (for those nice landscapes in the twilight) will take you "there" faster- if you ever figure where you want to go.  :rolleyes:

 

I haven't yet but as "they" say, the journey is what counts.

 

Good luck!

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The questions you ask invites a million answers. most are from other amateurs. I simply can;t chase down every Post and correct them Based on 50 years experience. Just buy the best you can. Heres my Botton Line.

 

 

"The gear you can't afford is not the barrier keeping you from success.

 Gear has very Little to do with it.

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This thing Laurin says about the slow zooms and to stick with a prime lens and simple camera in the beginning, rings true to me.

 

I struggled with my kit lens and another stupid slow nikon plastic zoom for nearly one year before I had it. One day, and I still don't know why I did this, I was so frustrated that I got rid of everything except for the camera. With the money I bought a 35 mm prime, and started using just that. I did this for one year.

 

Simplifying allowed me to concentrate on the basics and to learn some principles a little faster, and with that prime lens I started getting some good quality images more consistently. And since I could trust the lens to do its job and got acquainted with its limits, I had more time to concentrate on trying to fix my own mistakes. 

 

I know it is just a personal account and it may not be valid for others, but a good prime lens, a basic DSLR and a good tripod (for those nice landscapes in the twilight) will take you "there" faster- if you ever figure where you want to go.  :rolleyes:

 

I haven't yet but as "they" say, the journey is what counts.

 

Good luck!

All you newbies read and follow the above advise!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I've told people here for years to do exactly this same thing; Get a prime lens and only use it for 6 months to a year and you too will "be able to trust the lens to do its job and get acquainted with its limits".

Way to go Alessandra!

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I told you what you had to do. I said not only will you have to use a slower shutter speed but MUST ALSO use an aperture that will be small enough not to over expose the image. Remember me telling you long ago that when shooting manual shutter speed and aperture have a direct bearing on each other. Change one you will need to change the other to get a properly exposed image.

 

There are no specific settings to do this. It depends on how smokey you want the water to be. Slow shutter speed will give you some. A very slow shutter speed will give you more. This is where understanding the principles of photography come into play. You need to know what to do with your settings to get the desired result. The camera will not do this for you in this type of shot.

 

So for a shot like this you may need to take a few shots to get it right. Start with as I said at f16 with a shutter speed of 1/30th. Take the shot and look at it. If it isn't right change the settings. If you have a white screen where the shot is totally over exposed then you need to do what? You either must reduce the amount of light coming into the camera by using a smaller aperture and/or a faster shutter speed.

 

As I also said in my other answer the conditions may be such that you will not be able to get a properly exposed shot without the use of a neutral density filter to block out more of the light. You as the photographer must learn these things to get the kind of shots you want. It is about being a photographer and not just using a setting on your camera. Know what each setting on your camera does and how things will be different if you change one of them. Those are some of the principles of photography that you need to learn.

 

Also just Google Photography smokey water or something like that. You will find tons of information.

I would like to add to Dave's comments,

Dave said, "Start with as I said at f16 with a shutter speed of 1/30th. Take the shot and look at it. If it isn't right change the settings. If you have a white screen where the shot is totally over exposed then you need to do what? You either must reduce the amount of light coming into the camera by using a smaller aperture and/or a faster shutter speed."

I would like to add: You might also need to wait until the light is not so bright. Like later or earlier in the day. You could also lower your ISO but if you do not fully understand how F-Stops, Shutter Speeds and ISO work together to determine the correct exposure then you might want to hold off on changing the ISO until you do.

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Hello. I am having a bit of trouble understanding this, and before you go on hacking on me , I swear this is not in the User's manual, so I was trying today to set my camera to never ever go for more ISO than 1600, and found out the following : 


 


- I cannot set ISO other than Auto in Full Auto Mode


 


- I cannot set a maximum ISO in any Guide Mode ( Portrait, Landscape etc ) the maximum ISO can be different for each mode and variable from 800 to 1600 to 3200 in Auto-No-Flash , but I can override this as I have ISO set on my Fn button and can choose ISO myself


 


- I can set a maximum ISO in P S A M modes ( currently set to 1600 to reduce noise , it blinks in some situations so I think it wants more but I don't want to let it , maybe I open the aperture or decrease shutter speed ) 


 


 


Now. Are the above statements correct? 


 


And one more thing , about RAW format, I know  everyone and I mean everyone recommends it, but while struggling at the beginning with the D3300 and before that with the Nikon L120 , I arrived at the conclusion that if you really mess up your picture , especially focus, you're done, so, I can do a bit of editing on jpegs in PS CC, and meddle with highlights and shadows , contrast, and so on, so I don't really know what is the big deal about NEF / RAW .


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Hello. I am having a bit of trouble understanding this, and before you go on hacking on me , I swear this is not in the User's manual, so I was trying today to set my camera to never ever go for more ISO than 1600, and found out the following : 

 

- I cannot set ISO other than Auto in Full Auto Mode

 

- I cannot set a maximum ISO in any Guide Mode ( Portrait, Landscape etc ) the maximum ISO can be different for each mode and variable from 800 to 1600 to 3200 in Auto-No-Flash , but I can override this as I have ISO set on my Fn button and can choose ISO myself

 

- I can set a maximum ISO in P S A M modes ( currently set to 1600 to reduce noise , it blinks in some situations so I think it wants more but I don't want to let it , maybe I open the aperture or decrease shutter speed ) 

 

 

Now. Are the above statements correct? 

 

And one more thing , about RAW format, I know  everyone and I mean everyone recommends it, but while struggling at the beginning with the D3300 and before that with the Nikon L120 , I arrived at the conclusion that if you really mess up your picture , especially focus, you're done, so, I can do a bit of editing on jpegs in PS CC, and meddle with highlights and shadows , contrast, and so on, so I don't really know what is the big deal about NEF / RAW .

 

Use your camera in M mode and get your ISO to 100 period. If your Aperture and Shutter speed will not work at this level, change them. If you want to use a specific Aperture/Shutter for your shot creation (DoF/Blur/Freezing Motion etc.) then creep ISO up to 200, 400, 800 etc.

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And one more thing , about RAW format, I know  everyone and I mean everyone recommends it, but while struggling at the beginning with the D3300 and before that with the Nikon L120 , I arrived at the conclusion that if you really mess up your picture , especially focus, you're done, so, I can do a bit of editing on jpegs in PS CC, and meddle with highlights and shadows , contrast, and so on, so I don't really know what is the big deal about NEF / RAW .

 

You are correct, if you miss the focus that picture is probably done. A RAW file captures more information that can be used to enhance the image. Here is an example with a RAW file you can change the White Balance after the picture is taken. This cannot be done with a jpg file. Shooting RAW or jpg is like paying the same amount of money and then choosing between a Ferrari or a 4 cylinder Toyota to take a spin around a race track. Which car are you going to pick?

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Hello. I am having a bit of trouble understanding this, and before you go on hacking on me , I swear this is not in the User's manual, so I was trying today to set my camera to never ever go for more ISO than 1600, and found out the following : 

 

- I cannot set ISO other than Auto in Full Auto Mode

 

- I cannot set a maximum ISO in any Guide Mode ( Portrait, Landscape etc ) the maximum ISO can be different for each mode and variable from 800 to 1600 to 3200 in Auto-No-Flash , but I can override this as I have ISO set on my Fn button and can choose ISO myself

 

- I can set a maximum ISO in P S A M modes ( currently set to 1600 to reduce noise , it blinks in some situations so I think it wants more but I don't want to let it , maybe I open the aperture or decrease shutter speed ) 

 

 

Now. Are the above statements correct? 

 

And one more thing , about RAW format, I know  everyone and I mean everyone recommends it, but while struggling at the beginning with the D3300 and before that with the Nikon L120 , I arrived at the conclusion that if you really mess up your picture , especially focus, you're done, so, I can do a bit of editing on jpegs in PS CC, and meddle with highlights and shadows , contrast, and so on, so I don't really know what is the big deal about NEF / RAW .

 

Why do you want to go over 1600 with your ISO? I have been a photographer for over 40 years and I don't think I have ever used one that high.

 

I am not totally familiar with that camera but it is one that depends a great deal on auto modes. If you have it on full auto most likely the camera will make all settings for you and that is it.

 

As far as the different modes that is probably what the camera has programmed into it for those modes.

 

I would work on using the camera in manual mode so  you can make your own adjustments and settings and not letting the camera make the decision. If you want to make the ISO something other than what the program mode has it set for then why not just shoot manual to begin with?

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I told you what you had to do. I said not only will you have to use a slower shutter speed but MUST ALSO use an aperture that will be small enough not to over expose the image. Remember me telling you long ago that when shooting manual shutter speed and aperture have a direct bearing on each other. Change one you will need to change the other to get a properly exposed image.

 

There are no specific settings to do this. It depends on how smokey you want the water to be. Slow shutter speed will give you some. A very slow shutter speed will give you more. This is where understanding the principles of photography come into play. You need to know what to do with your settings to get the desired result. The camera will not do this for you in this type of shot.

 

So for a shot like this you may need to take a few shots to get it right. Start with as I said at f16 with a shutter speed of 1/30th. Take the shot and look at it. If it isn't right change the settings. If you have a white screen where the shot is totally over exposed then you need to do what? You either must reduce the amount of light coming into the camera by using a smaller aperture and/or a faster shutter speed.

 

As I also said in my other answer the conditions may be such that you will not be able to get a properly exposed shot without the use of a neutral density filter to block out more of the light. You as the photographer must learn these things to get the kind of shots you want. It is about being a photographer and not just using a setting on your camera. Know what each setting on your camera does and how things will be different if you change one of them. Those are some of the principles of photography that you need to learn.

 

Also just Google Photography smokey water or something like that. You will find tons of information.

Im proud of you. You did what I wish everyone would do. Perfect!!!!!!!!!!!!! I mean seriously How many 1000,s of times do we need to say this.?

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I have shot at every ISO up to 25,000.. everyone should............TO SEE WHAT HAPPENS ONLY. When Dave and I wrote our first book. I had to show what Noise Looked Like. At that Time I had the D2X which was Nikons Flagship Camera it took me forever to get a noisy Picture. Why?.. Because Noise is caused mainly By Exposure. I know exposure and It was tough. I had to go to 3200. Under expose and Push Process. True.

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You are correct, if you miss the focus that picture is probably done. A RAW file captures more information that can be used to enhance the image. Here is an example with a RAW file you can change the White Balance after the picture is taken. This cannot be done with a jpg file. Shooting RAW or jpg is like paying the same amount of money and then choosing between a Ferrari or a 4 cylinder Toyota to take a spin around a race track. Which car are you going to pick?

ok, I did not know about the WB , I understand, what can I say ,it lowers exactly by half how many shots I can take but ok 

 

Why do you want to go over 1600 with your ISO? I have been a photographer for over 40 years and I don't think I have ever used one that high.

 

I am not totally familiar with that camera but it is one that depends a great deal on auto modes. If you have it on full auto most likely the camera will make all settings for you and that is it.

 

As far as the different modes that is probably what the camera has programmed into it for those modes.

 

I would work on using the camera in manual mode so  you can make your own adjustments and settings and not letting the camera make the decision. If you want to make the ISO something other than what the program mode has it set for then why not just shoot manual to begin with?

no no , I do not want it to go over 1600, I don''t even want 1600 but in than environment indoors it might be useful 

 

Im proud of you. You did what I wish everyone would do. Perfect!!!!!!!!!!!!! I mean seriously How many 1000,s of times do we need to say this.?

yeah, it is kind of getting ridiculous how many times you said it  isn't it :D

 

so anyway I think I will shoot Full Auto, Manual, Guide , S , A ... and we will see :)  

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In the old days we would say, Film is cheap, Time is expensive. In other words use up all your film now because it might be a long time before you get to photograph this subject again. Now it would be Memory is cheap but Time is still expensive. Buy a card with a greater memory capacity or several cards with a smaller memory capacity.

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To answer a question which doesn't seem to have been answered clearly - or I missed it -  Editorial for Stock/Microstock is different from Editorial/News/Educational for legal requirements. Micro makes their own rules which are more restrictive than legal constraints. If we want to sell, we need to meet the Microstock rules. Legally we don't need all the same permissions that we need for agencies.

Microstock sells typically all over the world and unfortunately what is legally allowed and what is not varies from country to county. MS agencies have to take that into account. If you can't sell it in Timbuktu, it can't be up for sale anywhere.  it is not worth the risk. (punishments are horrible in Timbuktu lol) Selling through stock, requires a global mindset. (and not just from a legal point of view) So, micro's requirements are not more restrictive than legal constraints, there is just more involved. The world of micro is global

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yay , 10 out of 14 photos in my latest batch were approved on the most dreaded microstock site : Shutterstock ! :D

 

@ a monastery in Transylvania. 

 

so it''s not impossible 

 

also what do you think should I go for AF-Single or AF-Dynamic Area, the cars do move some of them but really slow on their platforms. Don''t know what to say about the models next to them :) 

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also what do you think should I go for AF-Single or AF-Dynamic Area, the cars do move some of them but really slow on their platforms. Don''t know what to say about the models next to them :) 

As Dirty Harry said, "A man has got to know his limitations." I think you should try both and see which works better for you. The best way to learn what is best in a given situation is to use different techniques and see which one gives you the best results. In some of my classes I give students assignments meant to show them the capabilities of themselves and or the camera. One I give is hand-holding a camera at 1/4 of a second shutter speed. For this assignment a blurry picture gets an A but they learn not to hand hold the camera at slow shutter speeds.

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As Dirty Harry said, "A man has got to know his limitations." I think you should try both and see which works better for you. The best way to learn what is best in a given situation is to use different techniques and see which one gives you the best results. In some of my classes I give students assignments meant to show them the capabilities of themselves and or the camera. One I give is hand-holding a camera at 1/4 of a second shutter speed. For this assignment a blurry picture gets an A but they learn not to hand hold the camera at slow shutter speeds.

yes but how do I see witch is better, zoom in as much as I can and look for blur or out of focus? 

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yes but how do I see witch is better, zoom in as much as I can and look for blur or out of focus? 

I think you are missing Mike's point. His point is that by knowing what the different settings do and how they can effect an image you have a better understanding of photography and what to use under different circumstances. Many of us have said over and over that the camera is just a tool and you are the one controlling it. You need to know what happens when you use a certain setting and how to know when to use the settings to get the shot that you want. Mike's lesson shows his students that you are not going to hand hold a camera a 1/4 of a second and get a properly focused image and that a tripod is necessary.

 

So what you need to do is try the different settings under different circumstances to see what your results are and what works better under what conditions. You are still thinking that you can just set your camera to what works best and let the camera do the thinking. You need to do the thinking and by looking at each circumstance know which setting will work for you. For example if what you are shooting requires a specific shutter speed to get a proper picture you would usually go with shutter priority. If shutter speed is not that important then aperture priority may be the best way to go. Other times manual will give the best results.

 

When it comes to focus if the object is not moving then a single point will work best, etc.

 

It is good that you are reading through the manual but do not look for the perfect setting that will suit all conditions because it doesn't exist. My suggestions to people usually are to start out shooting in manual mode so you learn more about the shutter speed/aperture relationship. Then work on white balance and know what each of them does, work on different focusing methods. Be the photographer and learn to control the camera, don't let the camera control you. If you really want to learn in a very interesting way go out and get yourself an old 35mm film camera. That will be an eye opener! :)

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