Jump to content
Fluieras Ana-Cristina

What camera should I use for photography?

Recommended Posts

This is a funny question, but I was wondering what photo camera should I use in order to be able to have good photos and upload them on shutter stock?

 

I currently use Nikon D5300, I am new in photography. I usually use pets for my photos, nature, macro, so basically my subjects are moving all the time.

 

I shot at 1/1000 speed and even more, but I keep having a problem - the subject is always a little blurred/moved. Not a lot, but just a little, and that little is enough to have my photos rejected from shutter stock. I know I can use a tripod and I did this, I used high speed in the middle of the day when the sun was up, so i had a lot of light, I even used flash when need, but still. Well not all of my photos are bad, but still, too many photos come out with this problem.

 

I am interested in your opinion, what camera should be good for stock photos? considering that I photograph pets, nature etc, so moving subjects, in these situations it is no time for tripod, I have to be quick about it and the photos should be good.

 

I am interested in what camera would be, let`s say, the minimum quality camera to use for shutter stock?

 

Please excuse my bad English! i look forward to hearing from you!

 

Ana

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think the camera is the problem really the issue. I have had photos accepted from an old nikon d40. The lens is the bigger issue. You need faster glass. Of course there are better camera bodies out there but I think the 5300 is enough to get the images accepted.

At the same time there are those that are getting the same rejection for focus using 5D's and D800's so if your fundamentals are off then the best camera in the world will not help

Just my experience and opinion. Maybe some of the more experienced people in this forum can shed some more light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It really isn't the camera. Probably it is your hand holding technique.

 

There are many different things that you can do to get an image that is in focus.

 

First, whenever possible use a tripod. This will stabilize the camera and help stop camera shake. Be sure to use a good solid tripod and not a flimsy piece of garbage that many camera stores sell.

 

If you are going to hand hold the camera then there is a technique on how to do it to give good support. There is also a guideline that you use a shutter speed that is about 3 times what the focal length of the lens is. For example if your lens is 100mm then your minimum shutter speed should be around 1/300th of a second.

 

Don't push the shutter down but rather roll your finger over the shutter. Pressing down can cause camera movement.

 

Also if you are using manual focus make sure that the camera's diopter has been set for your eyes. Your manual will tell you how to do this.

 

Here are some videos that Laurin and I did on focus.

 

 

 

Also when it comes to cameras the camera is not really the most important thing when it comes to image quality. It is always best to have good lenses. Try to buy the best lens you can afford. Cheap lenses with plastic optics are not always the best choice. A good lens may cost more but it is often worth it.

 

Also keep in mind that the best aperture to use for a sharp image is about f9 or so. If you go with a very small aperture such as smaller than f16 then you can start getting into diffraction which can make an image look out of focus. Going too far the other way can also cause distortion.

 

I hope this helps and if you have any other questions please let us know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Practice your technique. My friend...It's not the camera unless it's some crappy P&S with no control.. Never has been . to many Blame the camera. Better cameras are easier for certain things. focus is not one of those things....in any way. Glass is King for all Image making But still, Even with the best glass. It's about you.I can use your 5300 and get tack sharp Images...So can you. But ya got to do the work.And shoot till your finger bleeds.technique is everything!!!!!!! Then comes exposure, then composition,then the god of photography is having a COMPLETE understanding of the principles of DOF and how it relates to distance from subject and focal length used. Learn this and focus issues will disappear.

 

Classic Old question..."Whats the best camera" Answer..."the one you have with you"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's nothing wrong with that camera as long as you have enough light to shoot at higher shutter speeds. I have a shot with the Nikon D5200 in my port, as well as several with the Nikon D7100 (and D610), and these are fine cameras, but getting enough light to the sensor is key.

 

What I have found was that the kit lenses that came with the D5200 (18-55mm and 55-300mm, especially the 55-300mm), were really bad: very soft. And with a maximum aperture of f/5.6, they weren't very good at transmitting light to the sensor, either.

 

If those are the lenses you're still using, I would seriously consider trading them in for a good 70-200mm f/2.8 as your "portrait and sports" lens. Tamron makes an excellent version of a 70-200mm f/2.8 with excellent image stabilization (VC in Tamron terms, VR in Nikon terms).

 

Being able to open all the way up to f/2.8 on a zoom like that opens up all kinds of creative options, and lets you get 2 stops more light to that camera's sensor than an f/5.6 does.

 

If a lens like that is out of your reach, I would look at a fast prime, like a 50mm f/1.8. The key, again, is having glass that gets enough light to the sensor so you can keep the shutter speed up and the ISO low.

 

But with any lens, technique is critically important to image quality: keep your elbows tucked into your sides and use your brow ridge on the eye piece as a third contact point for the camera to your body (3 points make a plane). Then twist and bend at the waist, and try not to hold your breath: release the shutter on an exhalation, if you can, as this is when you will be most relaxed.

 

Resist the urge to "stomp down" on the shutter. Gently press (if you're already halfway pressed for focus) or roll your finger over it (as Laurin often suggests). Pressing down hard and fast will jerk the camera vertically, and that's where most camera shake blur happens, and this often creates the kind of blurry images most people can't seem to explain in their pics.

 

It's the difference between gently squeezing the trigger and pulling it in the shooting sports: pulling the trigger will pull your sights off the target while gently squeezing it will keep your sights on it.

 

Hope this helps.

 

P.S. I just read David's post and he covers these basics, too. The only difference between his approach and mine is that I'm a "gentle presser". I've never gotten the "rolling finger" approach down. But I also use the back button for focusing, and so generally have my finger halfway pressed down on the shutter button all the time anyway, making the button travel half as long. A gentle press is all I use to finish the shot.

 

And yes, I primarily shoot Canon. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One more thing I just thought of: are you shooting in one shot or continuous focusing mode? Because if you're trying to shoot fast moving animals in one shot, that may be part of the problem. When I shoot, as mentioned earlier, I shoot almost exclusively in single point or spot AF using AI Servo ("Continuous" in Nikon speak) mode using my camera's back button (AF On) to maintain focus on my subject's face or eyes as they move.

 

It's how I got almost all my bird-in-flight shots and these of our German Shepherd, shot using the Canon 5D MkIII and Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 VC:

 

stock-photo-large-german-shepherd-plays-fetch-in-the-waters-of-puget-sound-267209090.jpg

 

stock-photo-large-german-shepherd-plays-fetch-in-the-waters-of-puget-sound-267209096.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One more thing I just thought of: are you shooting in one shot or continuous focusing mode? Because if you're trying to shoot fast moving animals in one shot, that may be part of the problem. When I shoot, as mentioned earlier, I shoot almost exclusively in single point or spot AF using AI Servo ("Continuous" in Nikon speak) mode using my camera's back button (AF On) to maintain focus on my subject's face or eyes as they move.

 

It's how I got almost all my bird-in-flight shots and these of our German Shepherd, shot using the Canon 5D MkIII and Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 VC:

 

[/img]

 

Hate like hell to be the one asking the stupid question here, Phil, but is it necessary, in continuous focus mode, to depress the back focus button?

 

If so, I hadn't realized that. I shoot both Nikon & Canon, & the manuals suggest, I believe, that in continuous mode keeping the shutter release partly depressed is enough to maintain focus on a moving object.

 

If I'm wrong that might explain some of the trouble I've been having while covering more marathons, races, etc.

 

andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One more thing I just thought of: are you shooting in one shot or continuous focusing mode? Because if you're trying to shoot fast moving animals in one shot, that may be part of the problem. When I shoot, as mentioned earlier, I shoot almost exclusively in single point or spot AF using AI Servo ("Continuous" in Nikon speak) mode using my camera's back button (AF On) to maintain focus on my subject's face or eyes as they move.

 

It's how I got almost all my bird-in-flight shots and these of our German Shepherd, shot using the Canon 5D MkIII and Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 VC:

 

[/img]

 

Hate like hell to be the one asking the stupid question here, Phil, but is it necessary, in continuous focus mode, to depress the back focus button?

 

If so, I hadn't realized that. I shoot both Nikon & Canon, & the manuals suggest, I believe, that in continuous mode keeping the shutter release partly depressed is enough to maintain focus on a moving object.

 

If I'm wrong that might explain some of the trouble I've been having while covering more marathons, races, etc.

 

andy

 

You can certainly use the main shutter button in AI Servo mode, but the advantage of the back button is that it lets you stop focusing when you release it as you continue to shoot. If you use the shutter release as your focus button too, the camera will continue to focus as long as you have the shutter button depressed.

 

In my case, I set my camera controls to remove focus from the shutter button and place it only on the back button. The other advantage to this is that I never have to take my camera out of AI Servo mode. Using the back button means I can focus, recompose, and release just as I would in one shot mode, but releasing the shutter will NEVER cause a refocus to occur.

 

If you're shooting runners, use back button focus, position the AF point generally where their faces would be in the composition, then track them holding the back button down while shooting. This is the way all of the sports and wildlife shooters I know track focus with Canon or Nikon (Nikon lets you customize focus controls in its menus, too.)

 

The other advantage to back button focus is that you can tell the camera to stop focusing if an obstacle passes through the shot. Simply lift your thumb. It takes about 5 minutes to get the coordination down, but once you do, you'll rarely - if ever - use one shot or AI Servo on the shutter button again. ;)

 

Here are a couple of videos explaining the beauty of back-button focusing:

 

 

 

In the second video, the guy suggests turning it off when not in use. I always leave my camera set to back button focus on and in AI Servo, precisely for the reasons he states: tracking, recomposition, and pre-focusing on a spot.

 

Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To the OP, Buy a 50MM1.8 D But make sure you don't need a G version instead with that camera. Learn with that then expand. Try if you can to sell the kit Lenses mentioned. But as always My advice is learn technique.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many, many thanks, Phil. I looked at the videos. Might be something there. I've set both Nikon & Canon for backfocus in continuous modes. Got a march this evening I can try it out on, see if my reflexes are indeed modifiable at this advanced age, lol!

 

Not sure why it seems as thought I've missing focus on moving subjects more recently. I suspect in part that I've been shooting tighter frames, getting in closer, less DOF, etc.

 

One thing for certain, using this method will prevent my nose from shifting the focus point on the 810...:-)

 

Thanks again,

 

andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Many, many thanks, Phil. I looked at the videos. Might be something there. I've set both Nikon & Canon for backfocus in continuous modes. Got a march this evening I can try it out on, see if my reflexes are indeed modifiable at this advanced age, lol!

 

Not sure why it seems as thought I've missing focus on moving subjects more recently. I suspect in part that I've been shooting tighter frames, getting in closer, less DOF, etc.

 

One thing for certain, using this method will prevent my nose from shifting the focus point on the 810...:-)

 

Thanks again,

 

andy

 

No problem, Andy. If you take a second to set the focus point in the frame where you want faces composed, you'll find that it's easier to track.

 

In other words, if you're framing the marchers with their heads/faces near the top of the frame, put the focus point there, too, then you just have to hold and track without having to recompose. It will take some practice, but it's worth the effort to learn. Makes focusing on moving subjects much easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use AF lock constantly or continuous.Lock ,compose,fire in a split second. also One of the reasons99% of street shooters still use Leica Rangefinders. left eye open.But street shooters are always pushing ISO, Always have. None of these silly 100% rules at stock.When I do street, auto ISO for sure.and a 50 1.2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cristina, The way it works here when you post. You ask a question. we come in and give some advice, Then you stay with us and respond. then we have a conversation. thats the way it is.If you don't it goes off on some tangent that has nothing to do with your question.When you Post...Stick with us.....OK?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cristina, The way it works here when you post. You ask a question. we come in and give some advice, Then you stay with us and respond. then we have a conversation. thats the way it is.

 

LOL well put Laurin. I thought the exact same thing last night when I first read this thread. A whole bunch of talented folks have made helpful efforts here to help the OP and ..... nothing.

 

I suppose at least the advice has maybe helped all the lurkers that come here to glean ideas and information.

 

Some people eh?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cristina, The way it works here when you post. You ask a question. we come in and give some advice, Then you stay with us and respond. then we have a conversation. thats the way it is.

 

LOL well put Laurin. I thought the exact same thing last night when I first read this thread. A whole bunch of talented folks have made helpful efforts here to help the OP and ..... nothing.

 

I suppose at least the advice has maybe helped all the lurkers that come here to glean ideas and information.

 

Some people eh?

 

I am a guilty lurker - I never knew about the Back Button focus on my Nikon 3100 - I have set it up now and love the idea of locking onto a target whilst I jiggle around the composition etc.

 

One of the things that annoyed me was my camera trying to focus on odd things as I half-pressed the shutter (I was using single point AF) - the idea of locking should eliminate the static feel I had when trying to maintain Single AF focus.

 

Thanks all

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back button focus is the way to go

 

If you have been using your shutter to focus , it will take some getting used to, but you will never look back

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One of the reasons, I have said for years. read your manual 3 times. then read it again. Most throw it into a drawer and forget it. Mine is in the bathroom. I read it everyday.

 

Bathroom is good.

 

On the subway riding home with new purchase, not so much. Lost my d810 English-language manual. Got it in PDF, naturally, but makes for more challenging perusal in the john.

 

andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Many, many thanks, Phil. I looked at the videos. Might be something there. I've set both Nikon & Canon for backfocus in continuous modes. Got a march this evening I can try it out on, see if my reflexes are indeed modifiable at this advanced age, lol!

 

Not sure why it seems as thought I've missing focus on moving subjects more recently. I suspect in part that I've been shooting tighter frames, getting in closer, less DOF, etc.

 

One thing for certain, using this method will prevent my nose from shifting the focus point on the 810...:-)

 

Thanks again,

 

andy

 

No problem, Andy. If you take a second to set the focus point in the frame where you want faces composed, you'll find that it's easier to track.

 

In other words, if you're framing the marchers with their heads/faces near the top of the frame, put the focus point there, too, then you just have to hold and track without having to recompose. It will take some practice, but it's worth the effort to learn. Makes focusing on moving subjects much easier.

 

Tried it yesterday during a rally & march across the Brooklyn Bridge. I set both cams for back-focus. Ironically I wasn't comfortable with the Canon set thus--probably because I keep the 70 - 200 on it & am used to tighter framing. With fewer elements in the picture there's less need to re-compose after focusing. So I set the 6D back to shutter-button focusing.

 

On the 810, which I generally keep the 24 - 70 attached, I thought it had real advantages. At rallies I'm confronted with people holding signs. Want to get their faces sharp, but also include the content of the signs, which requires either moving the focus point or chopping off the sign.

 

So, for wider angle shots with more elements in frame, it's a real advantage. I didn't find it that difficult to get used to. Forgot a couple times early on, but then it was more natural. Even though the Nikon button is closer to the viewfinder, it's also large, easier to find without looking (my problem is the back of my thumb smudging my glasses, lol!).

 

I think the tricky part isn't engaging it, but remembering to disengage prior to recomposing:)

 

I'd heard of using the back-focus button before, of course, but I don't think I'd have been inspired to try it before this thread. So thanks for the tips & links.

 

andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

stock-photo-rocky-landscape-of-with-ice-peaks-in-background-blue-sky-and-fluffy-clouds-ladakh-jammu-and-252676954.jpg

 

Dear Sirs,

 

I am trying to gather some more knowledge here. I use D5300, back button focussing with AF-ON, AF - Continuous on this NIKON body. (So I think I am eligible to hijack OP's post, LOL!)

 

This shot was taken with focussing on the tree at the left. Back button was used to focus, then left the button off to keep the focus locked there, recomposed and was shot.

 

Now, the tree was kept at too extreme to the left so it was outside the most/ farthest left point of my 39 point AF points. Even then focus was maintained there. How it was possible ? I mean, I can understand that focus did not move from that area, after recomposing. But I did not expect that this process would work even beyond the areas of those 39 point AF areas.

 

I would be thankful if anybody could explain that.

 

Regards,

 

Rudra

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×