Jump to content
vincent shutterstock

Update for Vintage photos and videos

Recommended Posts

Shutterstock now accepts vintage content for commercial and editorial use if they are not in the public domain and if they are accompanied by a property release and/or a model release.

 

We consider vintage content to be content that was shot between 1930 - 1990. Vintage content is not public domain content (public domain content is generally defined as content to which the copyright has lapsed, usually shot before 1923). Please note that we do not accept public domain submissions.

 

For commercial use:

To offer your vintage content for commercial use you must be the copyright owner and provide us with both a property and model release.

 

Please also include the year the image was taken in the title/description. If the exact year is unknown it is acceptable to use Circa (Example: "CIRCA 1940: Vintage photograph of a woman standing in the garden")

 

Property Release requirements for commercial vintage content:

A completed property release is always required for the photograph or video itself.

If you are the owner of the content by inheritance/gift, please describe how you became the owner in the “Description of Property†field of the property release (ie., “My father gave me these photographs before he passed away.â€)

An image thumbnail or video screen-shot needs to be attached to the property release.

 

Model Release requirements for commercial vintage content:

A model release is required for any recognizable person

If that person is deceased, the model release needs to be completed and signed by the Next of Kin

An ID for the deceased person appearing in the image or video (if available) must be attached

An explanation of your relationship to the model in the “Description of Scene†field must be included

 

 

For editorial use:

Vintage images and footage submitted for editorial use also require proof of copyright ownership. They must therefore be submitted with a proper editorial caption and can be accepted only if a property release is provided.

 

Property Release requirements for vintage images:

A completed property release is always required for the photograph or video itself.

If you are the owner of the content by inheritance/gift, please describe how you became the owner in the “Description of Property†field of the property release (ie., “My father gave me these photographs before he passed away.â€)

An image thumbnail or video screen-shot needs to be attached to the property release.

 

note: Since a property release cannot be attached to editorial content in the Content Editor, we ask you to email the Property Release to submit@shutterstock.com before submitting the image or video for review. After review of the property release we will contact you with instructions for submission for review.

 

Thank you,

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shutterstock now accepts vintage content for commercial and editorial use if they are not in the public domain and if they are accompanied by a property release and/or a model release.

 

We consider vintage content to be content that was shot between 1930 - 1990. Vintage content is not public domain content (public domain content is generally defined as content to which the copyright has lapsed, usually shot before 1923). Please note that we do not accept public domain submissions.

 

For commercial use:

To offer your vintage content for commercial use you must be the copyright owner and provide us with both a property and model release.

 

Please also include the year the image was taken in the title/description. If the exact year is unknown it is acceptable to use Circa (Example: "CIRCA 1940: Vintage photograph of a woman standing in the garden")

 

Property Release requirements for commercial vintage content:

A completed property release is always required for the photograph or video itself.

If you are the owner of the content by inheritance/gift, please describe how you became the owner in the “Description of Property†field of the property release (ie., “My father gave me these photographs before he passed away.â€)

An image thumbnail or video screen-shot needs to be attached to the property release.

 

Model Release requirements for commercial vintage content:

A model release is required for any recognizable person

If that person is deceased, the model release needs to be completed and signed by the Next of Kin

An ID for the deceased person appearing in the image or video (if available) must be attached

An explanation of your relationship to the model in the “Description of Scene†field must be included

 

 

For editorial use:

Vintage images and footage submitted for editorial use also require proof of copyright ownership. They must therefore be submitted with a proper editorial caption and can be accepted only if a property release is provided.

 

Property Release requirements for vintage images:

A completed property release is always required for the photograph or video itself.

If you are the owner of the content by inheritance/gift, please describe how you became the owner in the “Description of Property†field of the property release (ie., “My father gave me these photographs before he passed away.â€)

An image thumbnail or video screen-shot needs to be attached to the property release.

 

note: Since a property release cannot be attached to editorial content in the Content Editor, we ask you to email the Property Release to submit@shutterstock.com before submitting the image or video for review. After review of the property release we will contact you with instructions for submission for review.

 

Thank you,

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Nice to know but now about what I highlighted above.

 

Usually when someone dies all of their ID is destroyed.

 

So how do you get ID for anyone dead?

 

And this also goes as to being the heir of the estate, just because you are the legal heir you were in charge of destroying all of their ID and personal info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shutterstock now accepts vintage content for commercial and editorial use if they are not in the public domain and if they are accompanied by a property release and/or a model release.

 

We consider vintage content to be content that was shot between 1930 - 1990. Vintage content is not public domain content (public domain content is generally defined as content to which the copyright has lapsed, usually shot before 1923). Please note that we do not accept public domain submissions.

 

For commercial use:

To offer your vintage content for commercial use you must be the copyright owner and provide us with both a property and model release.

 

Please also include the year the image was taken in the title/description. If the exact year is unknown it is acceptable to use Circa (Example: "CIRCA 1940: Vintage photograph of a woman standing in the garden")

 

Property Release requirements for commercial vintage content:

A completed property release is always required for the photograph or video itself.

If you are the owner of the content by inheritance/gift, please describe how you became the owner in the “Description of Property†field of the property release (ie., “My father gave me these photographs before he passed away.â€)

An image thumbnail or video screen-shot needs to be attached to the property release.

 

Model Release requirements for commercial vintage content:

A model release is required for any recognizable person

If that person is deceased, the model release needs to be completed and signed by the Next of Kin

An ID for the deceased person appearing in the image or video (if available) must be attached

An explanation of your relationship to the model in the “Description of Scene†field must be included

 

 

For editorial use:

Vintage images and footage submitted for editorial use also require proof of copyright ownership. They must therefore be submitted with a proper editorial caption and can be accepted only if a property release is provided.

 

Property Release requirements for vintage images:

A completed property release is always required for the photograph or video itself.

If you are the owner of the content by inheritance/gift, please describe how you became the owner in the “Description of Property†field of the property release (ie., “My father gave me these photographs before he passed away.â€)

An image thumbnail or video screen-shot needs to be attached to the property release.

 

note: Since a property release cannot be attached to editorial content in the Content Editor, we ask you to email the Property Release to submit@shutterstock.com before submitting the image or video for review. After review of the property release we will contact you with instructions for submission for review.

 

Thank you,

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

 

Hi,

What about images just edited to look like a vintage photo? It's necessary to keep these rules as well? Because year the image was taken is just an imagination and property release is another thing to have :-(... Or the edited photos look like a vintage will be no longer accepted to this category?

Thanks!

 

Michal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bluesorrow,

The short answer to your questions: yes.

 

plachym,

This policy is in regards to copyrights, not style. We consider vintage content to be only content that was shot between 1930 - 1990. Recent images that were shot to resemble vintage are not considered vintage.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bluesorrow,

It depends on the image, but just like any non-vintage image, you will need releases signed by all applicable people. As for an ID, if it is not available you won't need to provide it.

 

Reshat,

Postcards are unacceptable for commercial or editorial use due to potential copyright issues.

Postal Stamps are unacceptable for commercial use, but acceptable for editorial use only where the postal stamp is a genuine postal stamp and your caption contains copyright attribution to the appropriate Postal Service and artist of the work contained in the stamp.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vincent, I have some images made by me in Germany and France, 1959-1962.Some might be of interest but the quality of the scanned B+W pictures would not meet your normal standards due to grain, blemishes, scratches, etc. Will SS lower their acceptance standards in favor of their historical value?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

biketourist,

 

We are aware that vintage images are of a different quality than modern day digital photos, but the review standards are the same.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a large collection of old postcards until 1917. They are also not suitable for commercial or editorial use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anna, we can probably not accept those. Just like all other content on the site you need to own the rights, not just a hard copy, to submit the image.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
biketourist,

 

We are aware that vintage images are of a different quality than modern day digital photos, but the review standards are the same.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

 

Vincent, your statement seems a contradiction in terms to me. If vintage images are of a different quality, you must mean lower quality. So if your standards are exactly the same, then it follows that most vintage images would not be accepted. On the other hand most entities with a real need for the images would be willing to overlook some imperfections to have authentic pictures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
biketourist,

 

We are aware that vintage images are of a different quality than modern day digital photos, but the review standards are the same.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

 

Vincent, your statement seems a contradiction in terms to me. If vintage images are of a different quality, you must mean lower quality. So if your standards are exactly the same, then it follows that most vintage images would not be accepted. On the other hand most entities with a real need for the images would be willing to overlook some imperfections to have authentic pictures.

 

Yep!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My intention is to explain the requirements that we have set so that you can be best prepared for your submission. If or how you choose to use that information when selecting what you upload is what ultimately determines the approval rate of your content.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My intention is to explain the requirements that we have set so that you can be best prepared for your submission. If or how you choose to use that information when selecting what you upload is what ultimately determines the approval rate of your content.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

 

Forgive me for belaboring this, Vincent, but my original inquiry was based upon the fact that very few authentic film-based vintage negatives and their subsequent scans will equal the IQ of output from modern digital cameras.

 

Doesn't rarity or interest value perhaps, in some cases, supersede image quality? I am sure it would for potential users.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

biketourist,

Some customers value rarity more, other will value quality. There is no single answer for this, and we can go on for a long time without finding a resolution that will satisfy all contributors and all customers. We had to make a choice, and the choice was to maintain the quality level our customers have come to expect from us.

 

neirfy,

Yes, you do not need to know or name all people in the image for editorial vintage, as long as you own the image.

All content shot before 1930 is considered public domain and cannot be accepted.

 

Vincent

Shutterstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand that images taken before 1930 are regarded by SS as public domain, and therefore are not accepted, but I own the images, and they are the only known copies, can they not then be editorial as in style of clothing, etc.?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jeff,

 

The problem is that we cannot determine their status.

 

I think the general rule is that images before around 1930 are all public domain, so they cannot be owned, and if they are public domain we cannot accept them.

 

The only solution for us is to be safe and not accept them.

 

Vincent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry if this has already been covered but I am still very confused about all of the rules. Please allow me to explain my situation:

 

I collect old photographs and negatives. Please allow me to offer two examples and see if I can submit them here.

 

Example #1: A photo of people standing in front of a Chevrolet car in 1938/1939. The people are middle aged so they are certainly dead at this point. I don't know who they are anyway. Can I submit this photo as editorial? I do not know who took the photo or who is in the photo.

 

Example #2: photos of the 1939 world's fair. Let's just stick to the ones without people in them. I do not know who took them but I assume they are dead. Can these be submitted as editorial?

 

Thanks in advance for your time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

katherinewelles,

 

From your description it appears that you own copies of those images & negatives, but not that you are the copyright owner. As with all other content you must own the rights to the images to submit them.

 

If that is not an issue then we can only give a judgement by seeing the images, so submit them.

 

Best,

 

Vincent

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×