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Second submission - first rejected


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Even though it may be late in the game, I would like to start submitting images to Shutterstock. I finally did submit 10 images last week, but only four were approved. I included a screenshot of my first 10 images. Three images was not approved due to image is not in focus or the focal point is not appropriate for the composition. Two Images was not approved due to potentially infringes on intellectual property rights. The last image was not approved due to poorly composed and/or poorly cropped image. Even though I would like to have passed the test, I welcome the critique. Down the road, I know I'll become a better photographer if I can incorporated this to my images.

 

Now I have selected the next ten images and hoped that I could get some feedback from you. Any advise is most welcome.

 

Figured how to upload images without you have to download them. :-)

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The boats are the trademark, the last one is composed poorly because of the distracting grass in the way, #2 has something funky in the water and looks way over processed and everything is too small in the frame, The salad could work but it does look to be OOF as do some others.

 

Would be nice to have the 100% crops?

 

HOW TO POST

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=117778

 

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=42889&start=0

 

http://submit.shutterstock.com/newsletter/109/article1.html

 

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=122342

 

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=125897

 

http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=125423&start=0

 

 

Stock needs to be able to help sell or promote a product concept or idea and they need to be clean, noise free, free of any distractions, razor sharp at 100% viewing, the lighting needs to be perfect all the way across the subject and they need to pop, SS does not care much for harsh shadows.

 

When it comes to shooting for stock on SS they are looking for perfection across the board, lighting, exposure, WB, Focus and composition in the images.

 

The subject/image in the photo must stand out and be strong and free of anything that takes away from or distracts from the subject.

 

Quick rundown for you.

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I don't think you are too far off with your shots but as mentioned we need to see crops to check for focus.

 

I kind of like image 20140125 but the reviewer may have a problem with the depth of field which is showing the grasses out of focus. I like the effect but would probably keep that for after you get in.

 

The salad shot does have a very shallow DOF as well. I happen to like shallow DOF and use it a lot in my food work but if your focus is not spot on the reviewer may ding it. You could also use a touch more light in the bowl to help fill some of the darker areas.

 

For your shots that have a sky in them I would be more patient when it comes to stock work. Wait for some nice cloud formations and that will give the shot more drama.

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Hypothetically,I would look again with different eyes But Focus comes first. without, All else just goes away.

 

Focus is King, Then exposure which includes WB,then composition, then you have processing technique,Noise issues and finally subject Matter.Everything has to come together.

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The focus on most of these is not that bad. I think some of them would be fine focus wise.

 

As I mentioned before the shots are ok but they could be better. Shooting them in better light where the light is not so harsh would help and if you had more dramatic skies the images would be improved.

 

Let's see what else you have. Are the shots you showing us shots that were done after you thought of getting into stock or done in the past when you were just taking taking some shots for pleasure? I like to see shots after you thought about stock so you know what constitutes a good shot.

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Thanks hhltdave5 for taking the time to respond to my thread.

 

I agree that the images could have been better regarding light and the lack of drama in the skies. Just by going through this process I have become more aware of what makes a "good" image and hopefully I'll continue to improve.

 

Most of my shots shown in this thread were taken just for my pleasure. Even though if I should be accepted, I'll probably continue to shoot images which I like. But I will definitely be more careful about my technique and incorporate the use of a tripod as well.

 

I have selected another three images and three more will follow. :-)

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ss03 is a nice vacation photo, but it's not really composed the best for stock. The cottage is dead center, and many of the elements in the image are extraneous (not prominent or interesting in their own right) and best left out. The crop below might be a more workable possibility. The heavy shadows might kill it, though.

 

ss04 is good, but it's too bad you cut off the top of the boy's head. It's true this is done deliberately many times, but here it just looks like faulty camera aim.

 

ss01 has potential, but I would have included less of the foreground rock in order to give more prominence to the building (again, see below). Of course, this is a subjective view.

 

ss06 could work if it's in focus.

 

ss05 has some potential, but it looks pretty much like a tourist shot. Try cropping off some of the sky and the water for a panoramic effect.

 

ss02 doesn't work for me. Maybe something more like below:

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I agree with Ken on the composition issues. It can take some time but if you work at it you will learn to "see" the shot instead of just looking at it.

 

Part of it is what I call the shot within the shot. You have an overall view and then you look inside that overall shot to find other shots. I do it a lot with food photography but you can do it with all types of photography.

 

Look for balance, leading lines, perspective, the rule of thirds and ways to showcase the object of the shot. Look at everything in the viewfinder, take out what does not belong when composing the shot.

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The WB is a bit wonky on the last 2 also the man walking. The grass looks like you used some noise reduction? the grass has no detail and looks plastic. Noiseware does this.You said.."I'll probably continue to shoot images which I like."

 

Thats a key element in being Unique BUT.... This is a stock site , we provide Images with concepts that buyers can use in there work. I like pretty pictures also and have thousands But, They don't sell nearly the same.

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I have pretty much decided which ten image to include in my second attempt to be accepted at Shutterstock. I'll present one image per post with 100 % crop. Please post if you don't think the image will make the cut. I'm aware the the commercial value of the images selected may be limited, but my priority for now is to get accepted. Then I will work on the commercial side.

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