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pichunter

What Equipement do you need

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I have always wanted to do video, but have no present day expierence, other than little quick time clips p&S cameras offer.

 

What would be the best make model to get to participate in this amazing opportunity?

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Most digital camcorders( and some cameras) around will create footage of 480 horizontal pixels at an aspect ratio of 4:3, this means a minimum of VGA quality (NTSC - 29.97fps PAL - 25fps).

 

The problem will be the quality of that camcorders processing, lens and the software used to edit.

 

I hope my Sony HC39E will be good enough, I just need to find some editing software can't afford Adobe premiere at the moment.

 

I'm going to have a play with a program called Virtualdub, which you can get plugins for and even wright your own.

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I have a bunch of stuff in iMovie in a DV format. I wonder if this is OK. The quality is very good for TV viewing. But I am not anywhere near expert level in video. I dabble but thats about it. (so far... but I can see a new 3CCD camera in the future)

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VGA 640x480, as far as I'm aware is the minimum quality for TV resolution(4:3-UK).

 

The frame rates are standard at 29.97fps NTSC and 25fps PAL, these rates are also standard for DVD creation.

 

So needless to say that anything less than these standards are worthless to SS.

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Anyone care to offer a canon v other equipment choice for a keen newbie????

 

I guess there might be a lot of us in this information limbo from SS..............give us some help model#'s would be good....perhaps admin could give us some guidence

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I use a Nikon Coolpix 5400, nice pix but the video is truly lousy! I've heard that both digital cameras and camcorders really stink at doing each other's jobs, so I'm fairly sure that I am not going to be a player in this new arena. Short of buying a new camera or an actual video cam, what can I do to make my footage acceptable?

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A very reasonably priced piece of software is Pinnacle Studio 9. I have been using this for years.

You can obtain it for around $100.00 It is a very easy program to learn and use.

(It has actually been used by some movie companies in the US)

Can be used for capture, edit and make file. Hope this helps.

Kevin

You can read it at http://www.pinnaclesys.com

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I did a search on the "Pinnacle Studio 10" software through Google..... Cnet had some bad reviews as well as Circuit City (1 to 2 out of 10).... Still looking for software...

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Any of the modern MiniDV cameras should be fine to meet the technical criteria, I think the biggest difference will be the quality of the video captured. As you know a cheeper camera will have a lesser quality lens and such cause files to be rejected. I have a Canon ZR series camcorder and it's not the cheapest one. I am actually thinking to upgrade. I use mine for making home video's including my own personal stockpile of footage. For my fun and enjoyment it is fine but I an not expecting a huge acceptance rate for my videos as commercially acceptable.

 

It may be worth noting that the micro cams that are very popular right now (the ones that record onto flash cards) Will not likely be accepted. In my personal experience the video is poor and is typically saved as an MPEG file. If your thinking of buying a video camera for stock footage use, you might want to cut those cameras right now and narrow your choices.

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Any 3chip camera will produce a good results.I use VX2100e from sony.Or you can go for panasonic GS400.I own both camcorder and I must said I am happy with it.

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It is my guess that many submissions will be rejected because of camera wobble, as they should be. Many of the mainstream dv cameras don't have the quality of hand-held image stabilization necessary for commercial video unless the photographer is on the widest angle settings or on a tripod. I wonder if it's useful for the photographer to be concerned with things like lens quality if he or she doesn't use a tripod consistantly.

Jubal Harshaw

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Hi guys,

 

Video is what I have done for the last 14 or so years. You all are hitting right on. If you really want to go somewhere with this there are some prioritites.

 

3CCD camera. That takes in RGB each on a seperate chip. You can get by with single chip, but it isn't the same and your sales will show it. I currently shoot a Canon GL2 and it is the best bang for the buck. The GL1 will get in for less and do a good job. The better one to go for if you have the bucks is the Panasonic DVX-100A. The Sony VX series are excellent, but you will find the color different from Panasonic or Canon. The latter two I like better for outdoor work. Indoor it's the Sony. The HVR-Z1 is superb and will go for time to come with HDV 1080i. I played with the Panasonic PV-GS300 last week and was stunned with what I saw in a few minutes with it. All of the above are fixed lens. When you get into detachable lens, it is like the difference in DSLR and P&S for quality of work. The zoom on any fixed lens is a four speed with not much smoothness in between speeds.

 

Tripod: The next most important thing. It is a completely different animal from a still tripod. A walmart fluid head will not cut it. Minimum equipment to match with a 3ccd camera is a Bogen 501 head with some solid quick legs. Bogen is highly rated for still, but is basic for video. Names to look for are CSI, Daiwa, Miller, Cartoni, Vinten, Sachtler (the best last). Most all make a "DV" series. The fluid in the head allows for pan or tilt shots with smoothness. If your shot will be static, you can possibly make it with your still pod, but the whole idea is motion. Wobbly shots may not get you rejected here, but won't cut it for the client. Do this one right and you may go through several cameras before you are willing to part with the pod.

 

Polarizer, Cokin filter holder with graduated grey, to balance the brightness of the sky. Much more difficult for video. #1 graduated blue, #1 graduated sunset. Any filter more than #1 is way too much for video, except for haze and CR.

 

a large foldout reflector and a large silk (huge piece of cheesecloth type material) will help to diffuse sky and lighten chin shadows.

 

For indoor or close work a couple of soft boxes and a couple of Fresnel 400w +/- lights are a nice kit. don't forget the stands and a simple make-up kit (6 shades of powder and applicators)

 

Wireless microphone. Audio Technica PRO-88W is the best thing under $500. After that think about sony or Senneheiser.

 

Software: The best bang for buck is Sony Movie Studio Pro. Really though you need the full Sony Vegas, so you have manual color correction and Waveform Monitor and Vectorscope which give you brightness levels and color levels (aka luma and chroma) these work similar to a histogram and a color wheel for still work. Your video will probably not be legal for broadcast on a TV network if you don't use them. (glad to explain later)

 

Of course Adobe Premeire or Final Cut are the leaders in each of their fields, PC/Mac, and can do more faster. However the Sony products will take care of basic clip needs.

 

The above will have you hitting the target for the stock app. quite nicely. There is a lot farther one can go, and a lot more basic to start. Any consumer 3CCD camera and some single CCD's will do well, but really you end up as limited as you would feel with a P&S still cam vs. your SLR. A more expensive hobby, but the payback is better too.

 

All of the best to you,

Jim

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I did a search on the "Pinnacle Studio 10" software through Google..... Cnet had some bad reviews as well as Circuit City (1 to 2 out of 10).... Still looking for software...

 

Premiere Pro is amazing and with After Effects ("Photoshop on steroids," I've heard it called) and all the other peripheral programs that come with it, its more powerful than Vegas. But since you did say that price is an issue, try Premiere Elements, its very inexpensive and a great way to start with Premiere without the expense. You might could even make enough money with Elements to buy the Premiere Pro package.

 

http://www.adobe.com/products/premiereel/main.html

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