Jump to content

The Hummer Thread Vol.2!!!


Recommended Posts

Termites are a big thing here too unfortunately. Had to replace some beams on the roof when they did that a few years back, and part of the reason I had them re-paint the house was to provide a barrier to  deter termites. Theoretically the house was painted b4 we bought it, but they did such a crappy job, it was all peeling off within a few years. In huge chunks. So repainting, even though it wasn't cheap, is cheaper than repairing wood rot and termite damage if we'd let it go.

 

Was cleaning out the kitchen and found a handful of onions my husband put in the fruit bin and they'd gone to seed. His response, I wondered where I put those 🙄 ON the up side, it gave me something to photograph. LOL. Still need to process the images for the shelter. They only had a few new kitties there today. Fortunately, winter is the slow season.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 45.4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Sari ONeal

    7813

  • Barry Blackburn

    7685

  • KellyNelson

    6102

  • Wendy Townrow

    5716

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I'm fine here, thankyou for asking. Penneshaw (where I am) is safe and unaffected. But this is an incredibly grim situation. It sounds like just about half of the island is on fire. Annie, I only hear

I just feel like they ripped my whole identity away with this. Ten years ago in June in submitted my first pics to SS, and that started me on the stock trail. There's absolutely NO incentive to u

Sheila yes, it's an island but it is an extremely large island. The fires are well over 100km away. I have put water out for animals. Though it would likely be the animals from around here that would

Posted Images

@Rudy Umans

Here are some latest news on Aussie fires, if you're interested.

And I agree with what you said, about some things will recuperate and some take a long time, and some may never. Its when the bee colonies disappear that is the real scary part. No bees, no food chain.

Other news:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-15/firefighting-aircraft-delayed-by-international-disasters/11869676

and this is where the donations are going:

https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/australia/australia-fires-where-your-donation-money-is-going/ar-BBYW9Fs?li=AAgfIYZ

 

We had extraordinarily high temperatures very earlier in the season.

This was what we were up against. Below was the weather here in December. Its was unheard before. So early in the season, and so prolonged. I took the screen grab at the time to show some friends.

AdelWeather.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

The seasons are more extreme and summers seem to be longer. It's like summer and winter are intensifying while spring and autumn are disappearing. They're definitely shorter than the former. We are expecting rain wth snow in the mountains here. Hopefully no flooding. A few minor earth quakes in adjacent city, but it wasn't enough to wake me up in the middle of the night, so I guess it wasn't that bad (so far). Hayward fault is getting more activity on it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought all the fires in Australia were as a result of lightning strikes. I haven't really been watching a lot of news about them. That's really deplorable that people would cause such destruction purposely :( 

 

We are under flood warnings. Went out for a bit this morning, but it started raining about 5 min after I left the house and now it's going between rain and torrential downpours. Some flooding near some construction sites, but nothing serious on our island so far. Decided to just hang at home instead of possibly getting stuck somewhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Its mainly the heat that starts the fires. Or at least its one of the main contributing factors. The more extreme, the worse it gets.
 

What causes Australian bushfires:

Quote

Bushfires are common throughout Australia. They're made more likely when the weather is very hot and dry. The higher the temperature the more likely it is that a fire will start or continue to burn. They can start from human activity - either accidently or deliberately - or can start by natural causes like lightning.

 
A lot of our native trees need fire to regenerate, and fires are part of the natural order of the Australian bush. "Through fire and flood and famine (drought), she (Australian climate) pays us back threefold" - Dorothea Mackellar's famous poem that we all learn at school. 
 
But the temperatures here this summer have been too extreme. 
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Rudy Umans said:

Did I read it correctly that arson might have been involved?

Rudy, some fires have been deliberately lit but the majority have been started by Mother Nature

As Annie stated a lot of our native trees need fire ... in the past it has usually been one area at a time that gets hit and animals have a chance to escape. This time however the fires have been far more widespread and far more intense.

I saw a story the other day where one family had built a bushfire bunker and it could hold 12 people, I am wondering if this will be something that becomes more widespread. I can see people changing the way they build. Land, water and bush management will need to be addressed, whether our coal hungry leaders will want to address that is another matter entirely.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Wendy. I understand about trees (and forest)needing fire. Same here in South Florida

We have a lot of your Melaleuca trees and Australian pines (at least, that's what they are called here and thanks for that btw.) They can burn all they want, but fire doesn't seem to kill those invaders. Especially not Maleleuca. they seems to be as hardy as Australians :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Wendy, the wallabies over here come out during the evenings.

On Kangaroo Island in South Australia, most fires are started by lightning. Actually, I heard a thunder storm here shortly before one of the first fires started. That particular storm may have been the trigger.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Patrick the wallabies are not nocturnal they just come out during the cool times ... they are not silly :)  I had heard the lightning started the Kangaroo Island fires. With everything being tinder dry it doesnt take much to start the fire.

  

5 hours ago, Rudy Umans said:

Thanks Wendy. I understand about trees (and forest)needing fire. Same here in South Florida

We have a lot of your Melaleuca trees and Australian pines (at least, that's what they are called here and thanks for that btw.) They can burn all they want, but fire doesn't seem to kill those invaders. Especially not Maleleuca. they seems to be as hardy as Australians :)


they sure are Rudy :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Wendy Townrow said:

Patrick the wallabies are not nocturnal

Sometimes it certainly seems like the Penneshaw wallabies are nocturnal! Last night when I came back from a walk, there were a few wallabies hanging around. And it is quite common to see them around at night. Though of course they can be active in daylight hours as well up in the hills.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Patrick Cooper said:

Sometimes it certainly seems like the Penneshaw wallabies are nocturnal! Last night when I came back from a walk, there were a few wallabies hanging around. And it is quite common to see them around at night. Though of course they can be active in daylight hours as well up in the hills.

here the wallabies are around anytime in a 24 hour time-slot  ... and then if the squabble outside at night it is nearly as bad as having cats fighting out there lol!

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Patrick Cooper said:

Oh wow wallaby arguments are pretty rare over here. Ive seen two engaged in a duel up in the hills. It's common to see them in the suburbs in the evenings. They'll hop down the road and graze in front of peoples houses. 

we have not got as many around as we used to have, I have had about 8 at one go out there all having a family discussion, they hiss, chase each other and will fight.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So are yours, Wendy!

Speaking of macropod varieties, I was once having an interesting conversation with a young woman from Kenya, Africa. She assumed that there was one species of kangaroo in Australia. She thought that the different varieties (colours etc) were different stages of growth for the same species. She was really surprised when I told her that we have different species of kangaroos here. She then asked me how any species there were. I honestly don't know how many there are so I said there's at least five. And that made her even more surprised. She was mind blown. 

I should have told her about the tree kangaroos!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...