Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I haven't had a monthly income this low in ten years. I have a portfolio of over 10,000 images. What's next. No motivation. I've wanted to delete the portfolio several times. The uploading conditions have changed terribly. I don't put pictures from one series anymore, they are rejected for similarity. Shutterstock is no longer making work happy. It's more for anger. The work invested, the photo technique and creativity is trampled.
In 2008 my photos were accepted for the second time. It meant a lot to me. I was proud to be able to contribute. The demands on the technique of the photos were great and the portofolio was slow to build. Eventually I reached the highest level. I guess it really is time to quit.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing pictures and so many!!. 👍
Removing your photos doesn't make much sense to me. Earnings are declining. Almost every one of the old contributors complains about this. But you keep earning from it while the work is done. Only less.
For us newbies is the frustration that we have not experienced the good time. As long as I like it I'll keep photographing and keep thinking of it as a cheap hobby.
But frustrating that people at Shutterstock are getting very rich without caring about us.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Thijs de Graaf said:

Amazing pictures. 👍
Removing your photos doesn't make much sense to me. Earnings are declining. Almost every one of the old contributors complains about this. But you keep earning from it while the work is done. Only less.
For us newbies is the frustration that we have not experienced the good time. As long as I like it I'll keep photographing and keep thinking of it as a cheap hobby.
But frustrating that people at Shutterstock are getting very rich without caring about us.

Earnings are declining because the nature of the business is changing. Stock photography is a commodity business; low margin, high volume. 

The 'old' contributors are upset because the compensation model changed from historical performance to actual performance. While I think that levels should be based on rolling year performance rather than a January reset, I think the change made sense. No organisation pays compensation based on historical performance. The change in compensation amounts reflects the move to a subscription based model.

In my 40+ years of professional experience, I've seen industries come and go and companies come and go. I've worked for seven different companies and been involved in multiple 'mergers'. Nothing stays the same. You either roll with it or walk away from it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Charles Lewis said:

Earnings are declining because the nature of the business is changing. Stock photography is a commodity business; low margin, high volume. 

The 'old' contributors are upset because the compensation model changed from historical performance to actual performance. While I think that levels should be based on rolling year performance rather than a January reset, I think the change made sense. No organisation pays compensation based on historical performance. The change in compensation amounts reflects the move to a subscription based model.

In my 40+ years of professional experience, I've seen industries come and go and companies come and go. I've worked for seven different companies and been involved in multiple 'mergers'. Nothing stays the same. You either roll with it or walk away from it.

No that is right. Because of the increasing amount of supplied photos, better editing apps, and better cameras also available for the lesser photographers, you could see it coming that it was going to change.
Only the attitude of the leadership towards us has also become indifferent. You can see that with the disappearance of the admins. Also think of the disinterest in stolen photos, phishing on the forum. The total absence of explanation, for example about what they are doing with incorrect data, which are placed with our photos.
I worked for a company at a time when the construction industry in the Netherlands was in bad shape. Then it was normal that the earnings did not go up, but you accepted that, because the company continued to treat you socially.

 Besides, a company pays an employee with a longer service time, more experience often better. Not quite comparable, but a little bit. 🙂

Link to post
Share on other sites

Michal,

Admittedly, things have changed but when it is no longer financially practical to attract or even produce the type of images that buyers really want, It is nothing but a race to the bottom.  In the end, the only contributors that will continue to submit will be phone totting individuals that have no real comprehension of what makes a good photograph.  Professional (or experienced) photographers that pay for their models (animals or people) can no longer afford to create those WOW photos that made SS #1.  Additionally, anyone that takes pride in their photography and is willing to spend the processing time it takes to produce a "superstar" image won't sell it for 10 cents nor continue to submit images.  

Shutterstock's recent decisions have created profitable short term results but they won't attract the kind of images that will neither sustain their position or the industry they helped to create.  When "Old Timer" professionals like Michal quit submitting and their portfolios disappear, this industry (as we now know it) will disappear as well.           

Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Steve Bower said:

Michal,

Admittedly, things have changed but when it is no longer financially practical to attract or even produce the type of images that buyers really want.  It is nothing but a race to the bottom.  In the end, the only contributors that will continue to submit will be phone totting individuals that have no real comprehension of what makes a good photograph.  Professional (or experienced) photographers that pay for their models (animals or people) can no longer afford to create those WOW photos that made SS #1.  Additionally, anyone that takes pride in their photography and is willing to spend the processing time it takes to produce a "superstar" image won't sell it for 10 cents nor continue to submit images.  

Shutterstock's recent decisions have created profitable short term results but they won't attract the kind of images that will neither sustain their position or the industry they helped to create.  When "Old Timer" professionals like Michal quit submitting and their portfolios disappear, this industry (as we now know it) will disappear as well.           

Thanks Steve
it's been clear to me for many months where this is going. I've made my peace with low income. Since I play my portfolio on other microstocks I occasionally upload new images here.But today I got really annoyed when I saw the monthly earnings. I found it unbelievable that it was possible to drop like that. That's why I couldn't stand it and posted here on the forum. Unfortunately, Shutterstock may soon be dead. Or not.
It wouldn't even make me enough money to buy photo equipment today. So that's about it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Michal Ninger said:

I haven't had a monthly income this low in ten years. I have a portfolio of over 10,000 images. What's next. No motivation. I've wanted to delete the portfolio several times. The uploading conditions have changed terribly. I don't put pictures from one series anymore, they are rejected for similarity. Shutterstock is no longer making work happy. It's more for anger. The work invested, the photo technique and creativity is trampled.
In 2008 my photos were accepted for the second time. It meant a lot to me. I was proud to be able to contribute. The demands on the technique of the photos were great and the portofolio was slow to build. Eventually I reached the highest level. I guess it really is time to quit.

Your portfolio is amazing. If you could find the buyers and sell directly to them, for future photos you could probably do very well with rights managed licenses.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

  

On 7/31/2021 at 5:03 PM, Michal Ninger said:

Thanks Steve
it's been clear to me for many months where this is going. I've made my peace with low income. Since I play my portfolio on other microstocks I occasionally upload new images here.But today I got really annoyed when I saw the monthly earnings. I found it unbelievable that it was possible to drop like that. That's why I couldn't stand it and posted here on the forum. Unfortunately, Shutterstock may soon be dead. Or not.
It wouldn't even make me enough money to buy photo equipment today. So that's about it.

We already have one example in industry of where this could potentially go. Storyblocks. They have unlimited downloads of photos, videos and music with 34 usd. If you want only videos, its 18usd monthly. I hope Shutterstock is not on its way to this kind of decisions... 

Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a great portfolio. But your problems don't bother SS. SS is doing great, stocks and earnings are growing. How could it be otherwise if the income of the contributors has decreased by 3 times. I guess it's time for you and other professionals to choose a different type of income. I'm not just talking about shutterstock, but about microstocks in general.

One day, they will pay $ 0, 0001 for a photo, and all the same there will be contributors who will work with them and want to play the lottery, and suddenly there will be a big payout. Most likely, SS will offer an application for mobile and photos can be sent directly, and the shutter's artificial intelligence will correct minor exposure errors by itself, make it bright, attribute everything and make headlines with voice. Shutterstock already has 6 million photos, he doesn't need any more. If necessary, then only the editorial of some events. SS can only change the algorithm and toss up his old photos. Tomato will remain a tomato in 10 years, handshakes and photos of animals will not change either.. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...