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I am really puzzled about the payments I receive for the video downloads. So far they range from $0.81 to $12. Unlike for stills, it doesn't say whether they were subs downloads or on demand, or anything else for that matter. It's really puzzling. I would appreciate some transparency here but, may be, I am asking for too much from SS.

Another agency gave me 40% of the download value I had set but the downloads are much lower there. 

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No offense, but those are nothing but excuses.  Everyone has access to unique subject matter that other people would have trouble matching.  Besides, you don't even know what my best selling clips are

Of course, it all is important, but it doesn't really matter if your video was sold in bulk packages it costs nothing. I don't upload footage here anymore but I get some money for old ones.  One o

That is an insult for great port you have! :(

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You get a percentage of the sale price depending on what level you are on. https://submit.shutterstock.com/payouts?language=en
The amount of actual money will vary depending on the package/size etc the buyer has purchased - they will pay different amounts. 
Very low earnings probably come from things like Wix or FB deals. But we always get the same percentage dependant on our current level no matter what. I guess the purchase price is to variable for SS to break it down further than they already do to share with us. 

I doubt there are any individuals that will earn 40% for videos here, you need to have 25,000 dls (in any one year) before you can reach that top level! 

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5 hours ago, LSP EM said:

So far they range from $0.81 to $12. Unlike for stills, it doesn't say whether they were subs downloads or on demand, or anything else for that matter

There are only cart sales and clip pack sales for videos - and the price depends on size and the use, like Linda said.

To see which ones they were, go to your earnings summary page  https://submit.shutterstock.com/earnings?year=2021&month=06&language=en

then click on the date link, for example https://submit.shutterstock.com/earnings/daily?category=25_a_day&language=en&date=2021-06-04

and click on the tabs on top for sales of

Subscriptions (x) / On demand (x) / Enhanced (x) / Cart sales (x) / Clip packs (x) / Single & other  / Referrals (x)

 

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If you have good clips that attract high-end buyers it should all even out over time.  Yes, we all have some low-paying sales but they should be balanced out by the high-paying sales.  If all your sales are only earning a few cents, then there might be something wrong with the subject matter of your portfolio (no commercial value), your metadata (keywords and descriptions), or the technical quality and/or specifications of your clips.

My lowest commission this month was $1.00 and my highest was $135.But it balances out.  So far I am averaging $25.62 per sale, which is lower than it was a couple of years ago, but not too bad for today's market.

 

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I think Doug not many of have access to places that you have had. The reason you are getting high end sales could be because you have unique contents in your collection. A big chunk of your Top Videos consists of space technology and most of us don’t have access to that. If you don’t live in the capital city, industrial town, near a sea port or close to a space centre then you have a definite disadvantage and your portfolio will reflect that.

I have come to realise that where you are located has a big bearing on what you can shoot. Another option is to travel but that costs money and there is no guarantee that you will get it back. It’s not hard to achieve high technical standard with the right training but shooting contents that sell is way harder to achieve as that could largely depend on your location and what you have access to. 

 

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13 hours ago, LSP EM said:

I think Doug not many of have access to places that you have had. The reason you are getting high end sales could be because you have unique contents in your collection. A big chunk of your Top Videos consists of space technology and most of us don’t have access to that. If you don’t live in the capital city, industrial town, near a sea port or close to a space centre then you have a definite disadvantage and your portfolio will reflect that.

I have come to realise that where you are located has a big bearing on what you can shoot. Another option is to travel but that costs money and there is no guarantee that you will get it back. It’s not hard to achieve high technical standard with the right training but shooting contents that sell is way harder to achieve as that could largely depend on your location and what you have access to. 

 

No offense, but those are nothing but excuses.  Everyone has access to unique subject matter that other people would have trouble matching.  Besides, you don't even know what my best selling clips are or where/how I shot them so it is foolish to say that my success (or lack thereof) can be attributed to my location.  Are there human beings where you live?  If so, then shoot them doing things in a cinematic, creative and interesting way -- and then get them to sign a release.  That is where the real money is -- yet I have none of that in my portfolio. But you don't hear me complaining I don't have anyone to shoot who will sign a release.  I shoot other things instead.  Everyone needs to shoot what is appropriate for their location and interests.  If we all shot the same stuff nobody would be making any money at all.

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I used to have 4-5 sales in average per month. But, I received 25-100$ per video. Now I have 20 sales average a month, but I receive 0.30$ (30CENTS) per video. I only have videos in my portfolio. 

It is such an insult when I see I got 0.25$ per sale... I did not upload a single new file here since that "new payment policy" came out, and I never will. I am actually thinking to delete all the files from here. It is really as they are mocking us. 

I am uploading new files constantly on Pond5, and usually one sale there is 5 times more money than all the monthly sales here on Shutterstock combined. Shame.

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I'll admit that the income potential here at Shutterstock is not as good as it once was, but it still very good.  64 sales this month for $1432.

That's an average of $22.38 per download. If you have good images of subject matter that is in demand, and good metadata to help customers find it, you can still make money.

June23.png

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40 minutes ago, Doug Jensen said:

If you have good images of subject matter that is in demand, and good metadata to help customers find it, you can still make money.

That's precisely where the mystery lies for me Dough. I can control the technical quality of a clip and ensure that the metadata is good but to me 'good subject matter that is in demand' is a complete puzzle and I might not be alone I guess. How does one ever find out! I can understand filming ducks, trees and flower might be of total waste of time. Any topic that SS is saturated with is also not worth attempting.

Please forgive me for being naive, I have a big L plate on in this field.

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6 hours ago, LSP EM said:

 I can control the technical quality of a clip and ensure that the metadata is good but to me 'good subject matter that is in demand' is a complete puzzle.

As I have said many times before,  you have to ask yourself, "Who would use this footage and how would they use it?"  You watch TV, right?  Pay attention to movies, news programs, television shows,  documentaries, etc. to get a feel for WHAT kind of video producers/editors are looking for.  Those people are your customers.  And then pay attention to the style, lighting, exposure, composition, etc. of the clips they choose to use.   That is what sells.

But just forget about subject matter for a second. You didn't ask for a portfolio review so I'm going to keep my specific comments to myself,  but I think you overestimate the technical quality of your clips and your metadata. Most of them are the equivalent of "snapshots" with no strong subject or style to them.  It is as if the camera has just been aimed in a certain direction and the record button was pressed.  You have to think about WHAT the shot is about and WHO would use it and HOW. 

In addition,  in my opinion, your descriptions don't describe the real subject of the clip and you often get too bogged down on insignificant details such as the location, race, sex, age, and clothing of the people seen in them.  You also have a lot of keywords that don't really apply to the the clip, and that actually hurts sales.  I apologize if I've gone too far in my comments, but you have asked the question about subject matter more than once -- but I really don't think that is the only issue.

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Thanks Doug. I appreciate you taking time to look at my portfolio. I’m on a steep learning curve and just a beginner when it comes to the world of sock videos. So, thank you for taking time to give me a very helpful advice about my portfolio. Much appreciated. 

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On 6/24/2021 at 7:52 AM, Doug Jensen said:

Take a look at Annie's portfolio for a great example of clips with excellent technical quality, great metadata, and subject matter that someone with the right talent could setup and shoot almost anywhere in the industrial world where they live.    https://www.shutterstock.com/g/Milleflore+Images/video

 

Doug, I nearly fell off my chair when I read this. 

But thanks - not sure what else to say. I am a bit taken aback.

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On 6/11/2021 at 2:08 AM, Doug Jensen said:

No offense, but those are nothing but excuses.  Everyone has access to unique subject matter that other people would have trouble matching.  Besides, you don't even know what my best selling clips are or where/how I shot them so it is foolish to say that my success (or lack thereof) can be attributed to my location.  Are there human beings where you live?  If so, then shoot them doing things in a cinematic, creative and interesting way -- and then get them to sign a release.  That is where the real money is -- yet I have none of that in my portfolio. But you don't hear me complaining I don't have anyone to shoot who will sign a release.  I shoot other things instead.  Everyone needs to shoot what is appropriate for their location and interests.  If we all shot the same stuff nobody would be making any money at all.

I agree with Doug one hundred percent. Every place has its own unique character, be it beaches, mountains, even roads and highways and trains. I even shoot photos and videos of an earth excavator machine in an open plot near my house from time to time, and it sells. You never know what someone in some distant part of the world is in need of.

I sold this clip over the weekend from Israel for $ 15.80.

https://www.shutterstock.com/video/clip-1068247043

I had been to this location to shoot some trains via drone and got the dry landscape as well, that someone wanted in Israel.

Hope my point is understood.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/23/2021 at 5:58 PM, Doug Jensen said:

I'll admit that the income potential here at Shutterstock is not as good as it once was, but it still very good.  64 sales this month for $1432.

That's an average of $22.38 per download. If you have good images of subject matter that is in demand, and good metadata to help customers find it, you can still make money.

Of course, it all is important, but it doesn't really matter if your video was sold in bulk packages it costs nothing.
I don't upload footage here anymore but I get some money for old ones. 
One of my footage sells very well. I sell it more than 300 times this year. So I suppose it has good quality and metadata.
So in March, I had 1st Level and I got 26 cents for this footage.
Now I have Level 4 and I got 25 cents for this footage.
The price of the footage in the cheapest footage package is 8,33$. 15% from 8.33$ is 1,24$.
They told me that they also have some bulk packages, but what is the price of my footage in it?
I want everything to be transparent.
I want Shutterstock to show me what price the customer pays for my footage. 
And maybe I don't want to sell some footage in bulk packages because I spend too much time on that. 
Right now it doesn't look fair.

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