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On my monitor white background, in my portfolio lot of gray


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Hi everyone, I edit a photo in photoshop. Background is crystal clear on my monitor. I submit a photo, photo is placed in my portfolio and then I see what I missed to erasure. Doesn't anybody experience this. I played with brightness and contract on my monitor, no success. Any help highly appreciated. Thank a lot. I hope you are going to see it on enclosed photoCRUTCH700.thumb.jpg.54227c40602df7ee174c04509c63e336.jpg

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Before you upload isolated objects, you should check if the supposed white background is really white. Duplicate the layer and set under > Brightness/Contrast to minus 150, so you can immediately see if the image is clean.

But I agree with Reimar: There is a problem with your monitor and/or your calibration.

 

Brightness_Contrast.jpg

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You can also do a check for that by going to level adjustments, move the slider all the way to see the uneven parts.

You can also use a level adjustment layer to fix it fairly easily - look for a tutorial if you don't know how to do it.

 

Also, here is a link for your to adjust your monitor

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/

 

 

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Otto 

I'm a little surprised the photo was accepted as shown but then the acceptance process is definitely a crap shoot good and bad.  I can't help you with your monitor adjustments but a gear head may come along that can help.  However, I suspect that your current monitor is not up to the task no matter what you do.  My former monitor provided similar results while my 4k TV had excellent contrast and showed these kind of things easily.  If a new monitor is not in the immediate future and you use Photoshop, I might suggest the following quick fix.

With isolations on white (like your example) I always check "Levels" in Photoshop.  You probably will see on the far right (highlights) a rather thick band that stretches from the top to the bottom of the histogram.  If there aren't other white pixels in your image this will represent the white (and the not so white) pixels in the isolation.  While it often takes some adjusting, I slide the the highlight slider to the left until it is at the beginning left side) of the large band of highlights and click OK adjusting all those pixels to 255 white.  The preview will help with the exact setting but with your current monitor this may not be overly helpful.  On my old version of Photoshop, I also have to readjust the midtone slider as my highlight adjustment slightly adjusts midtones as well. 

Hopefully, someone can help you with your monitor issue but the  Level check will also identifies those isolation images that have the problems similar to your example whether you make the adjustment I describe or not .            

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Thanks alot guys, I definitely will try all of your suggestion. I start with a calibration . Let me just add up some info: I bought my monitor roughly 2 years ago /Benq GW2765/. Since monitor was new, I haven't touched it. After a few months monitor gave me an eye strain, so I cut down brightness and contrast a bit. I did that twice. When I set monitor back to the default, the problem persists


 
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4 hours ago, OttoPles said:

After a few months monitor gave me an eye strain, so I cut down brightness and contrast a bit. I did that twice. When I set monitor back to the default, the problem persists


 

It needs to be calibrated and profiled.  With hardware calibration tools.

Without that its impossible to get accurate brightness, white or anything else.

(But that still wont help you editing, you need to be looking at levels in PS and making sure its 100% white when filling)

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Otto, you need a calibration device for the monitor. When using normal monitors like above, I used to have a Spyder calibrator (reasonably cheap, they read the colours/brightness from your monitor and tell you what needs adjusting).  Now I have an Eizo with built in calibrator, which is a monitor specifically designed for photographers, but they aren't cheap.

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8 hours ago, OttoPles said:

Thanks again guys. The funny thing is that I have changed my monitor in order to make better photos and I achieved the opposite. I used to have old Dell 1920 x 1080px monitor and didnt have this kind of problem. Never mind, calibration and your advice in PS editing will solve it.

Your BenQ monitor has special features to prevent eye strains. Make sure your monitor is set to sRGB 0-255. I have a BenQ SW2700 without any problems whatsoever. You shouldn't have any problems with yours, at least not because of the monitor

and like others said. Calibrate. 

To check the cleanness of your background, Sari's method is by far the most accurate. Level adjustments on it's own layer

What I (used to) do is a little different than what you do. I select the object, delete the background, create new layer, solid color and go over the edges of the object  with a small soft brush to smoothen out the edges and done. In the latest PS CC, PS can select the object for you.

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1 hour ago, Rudy Umans said:

Your BenQ monitor has special features to prevent eye strains. Make sure your monitor is set to sRGB 0-255. I have a BenQ SW2700 without any problems whatsoever. You shouldn't have any problems with yours, at least not because of the monitor

and like others said. Calibrate. 

To check the cleanness of your background, Sari's method is by far the most accurate. Level adjustments on it's own layer

What I (used to) do is a little different than what you do. I select the object, delete the background, create new layer, solid color and go over the edges of the object  with a small soft brush to smoothen out the edges and done. In the latest PS CC, PS can select the object for you.

Quite right.  The OP seems to be using a brush to clean up the background.  Much easier to select the whitish background (with a magic wand, say) and then reverse the selection to include only the object.  Then fill the background with 255 white and perhaps use a soft brush on a mask if some edges need further softening.  There are other cutouts in the OP portfolio that could benefit from such a treatment.

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18 hours ago, Former_Poster said:

It needs to be calibrated and profiled.  With hardware calibration tools.

Without that its impossible to get accurate brightness, white or anything else.

(But that still wont help you editing, you need to be looking at levels in PS and making sure its 100% white when filling)

I don't think his monitor has user set hardware calibration, but software calibration works just as well in most cases IMO

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I love this forum! I learned a lot. THANK YOU ALL. My white background editing in PS  will be much more effective. I wish you all the best light to your lenses!

By the way. Recently I submitted swiss army knife. Photo was rejected. This is the reason:

Title / Keyword Trademark: Title and/or keywords contain trademark issues (e.g. brand name, company name, etc).

I used this description and keywotds:

Many task army knife. Multi tool pocket knife.
pocket, knife, scissors, army, tool, stainless, swiss, multipurpose, screw, red, multifunction, blade, multitool, penknife, compact, victorinox, travel, sharp, many, handle, screwdriver, equipment, saw, metal, switzerland, survival, work, options, white, handy

Is there website where I can check my keywards? Thanks


 

ARMY-KNIFE2A1300.jpg

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16 hours ago, Former_Poster said:

Ive never seen a calibration done using purely software come out anywhere near accurate.

A Spyder or similar will cost about $70 and get it right.

May there is some misunderstanding here. If you talk about  hardware calibration I read it that I can hardware calibrate my monitor, meaning I can directly program a EEPROM chip in the monitor, but it requires proprietary (BenQ in my case) software and a sensor like from Spyder or X-rite. The Spyder or X-Rite software that came with their sensors cannot hardware calibrate. It cannot erase and re-program the chip. The BenQ proprietary software sucks however and i was never able to get it right. Not even at the recommended settings. Software based calibration with the sensor does a much better job.

If you have experience with this kind of hardware calibration, I am all ears. 

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I'm using it to mean a hardware based device that'll create a correct colour managed profile for the operating system (and all colour managed attached apps) to use.

More useful again if you then calibrate your printer and so on for properly matched output.

Whether its eeprom or software it achieves the same results.

(I take software calibration to be the ones entirely based in software such as looking at coloured squares on windows etc.  These are useless).

 

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5 hours ago, Former_Poster said:

I'm using it to mean a hardware based device that'll create a correct colour managed profile for the operating system (and all colour managed attached apps) to use.

More useful again if you then calibrate your printer and so on for properly matched output.

Whether its eeprom or software it achieves the same results.

(I take software calibration to be the ones entirely based in software such as looking at coloured squares on windows etc.  These are useless).

 

Printing is a whole different chapter and starts with downloading the proper profile of the paper you are using from the manufacturer's website (Canson and Hahnemuller in my case) The printer software/properties must also be able to access that profile so you can actually use it and not all printer can. I use Canon's print studio pro photoshop plugin and in my opinion nothing comes even close to Canon's psp. I don't do much color printing, but greyscales can be just as tricky

I agree, the display "calibration tools" build into windows are horrible and can really screw you up. Never use those!

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