Jump to content

Do I need a full frame camera?


Recommended Posts

Currently have a Nikon D7100, usually with a 50mm f/1.8 on. I like it.

What benefits are there of a full frame? Better pictures? I mainly shoot outdoor portraits as well as some wide angle aerial shots.

 

What is the current rated Nikon (or other make) full frame https://trackeasy.fun/usps/?

 

Anything else I need to know?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Neeji.

I don't currently shoot a full frame camera but I use to (Canon 5D II).  I'll only mention the most obvious full frame advantages,  as I'm sure some of the current full frame shooters will chime in with more detail, especially regarding the current Nikon full frame offerings.

1.  Less noise and better high ISO performance.

2.  Better Bokeh, smoother background rendition.

3.  Related to #2 above, you can reduce the image depth of field more with a full frame camera than when using a cropped sensor camera.  This can be very useful in portraiture or any image where a  shallow depth of field is preferred. 

There are disadvantage however, to using a full frame camera as well.  Again the obvious ones are as follows:

1. They tend to be larger and heavier, especially the lenses.  A major disadvantage if you have to carry your equipment long distances over rough terrane. 

2.  The opposite of some of the advantages to full frame cameras, specifically less depth of field when using similar focal length and aperture lenses.  This is a disadvantage in macro photography where depth of field is at a premium.

3.  Full frame cameras tend to be more expensive than their crop sensor counterparts. 

Given your stated interest, it sounds like a full frame camera might provide some welcome advantages.       

Link to post
Share on other sites

If this question is purely for stock images then it's not worth the cost. Moving to a full frame wont increase your earnings. If it's from an interest in photography point of view that's another matter and is going to depend on a lot of personal requirements as well as the sorts of things Steve pointed out.

I have a Nikon D800, it's a great camera but a brick. I kept my D3200 and still use it more. Better for a lot of macro and out and about shots. I tend to just use the D800 in tripod situations, product shots for example. Newer cameras probably aren't so cumbersome, but I haven't used them so can't offer any advice.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You don't "need" a full frame for Microstock. Anything you can do with a full frame, you can do with a crop sensor, you just have to use different lenses and methods. I can't see your portfolio, maybe you can logout and back in and make it show?

Ask some of the other people here who have Sony mirrorless cameras (Or Olympus or Panasonic or...) if they miss their full frame Canon or Nikon.

If you find you have a need to spend large amounts of money to earn 10c then fine, have at it. Consider the economics? Nothing wrong with crop sensor cameras, and no reason to get a newer camera.

What I think you should be looking at, if you have a 50mm f/1.8 as your lens, is not a new camera, but investing in bigger and better lenses. The lens is the eye of the camera, the sensor is just what captures the image. You can make much better quality images, with a better lens, than a better camera and an average lens.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
On 4/2/2021 at 3:48 AM, Linda Bestwick said:

If this question is purely for stock images then it's not worth the cost. Moving to a full frame wont increase your earnings. If it's from an interest in photography point of view that's another matter and is going to depend on a lot of personal requirements as well as the sorts of things Steve pointed out.

I have a Nikon D800, it's a great camera but a brick. I kept my D3200 and still use it more. Better for a lot of macro and out and about shots. I tend to just use the D800 in tripod situations, product shots for example. Newer cameras probably aren't so cumbersome, but I haven't used them so can't offer any advice.

Beautifully said Linda. With the current state of earnings within the stock image industry it really wouldn't be wise to invest in a full frame camera.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2021 at 10:48 AM, Linda Bestwick said:

If this question is purely for stock images then it's not worth the cost. Moving to a full frame wont increase your earnings. If it's from an interest in photography point of view that's another matter and is going to depend on a lot of personal requirements as well as the sorts of things Steve pointed out.

I have a Nikon D800, it's a great camera but a brick. I kept my D3200 and still use it more. Better for a lot of macro and out and about shots. I tend to just use the D800 in tripod situations, product shots for example. Newer cameras probably aren't so cumbersome, but I haven't used them so can't offer any advice.

Agree absolutely. I have similar cameras(D800 and D5200). They're both great for stock or almost anything else and the great thing about the D5200 series is the fully articulated monitor. D800s are big lumps especially with a grip but they are good with 36Mp full frame and really cheap used (I paid €600 for my D800 with only 20K shots on the shutter). My take everywhere camera is a Sony A6000 APS-C  (24Mp) sensor with 16-50mm kit lens which you can buy new for less than €500 now. This camera fits in my pocket of a photo-jacket and delivers fantastic quality (far in excess of what's required for stock). So, with current earnings in micro-stock....stick with the camera you have. Invest time in seeking commercial subjects that sell rather than in bigger format sensors. Many of my best-sellers here have been taken with APS-C sensor cameras of 10 and 12 MP.....so, size of file and camera sensor are not the problem for sales. That has more to do with the image position in search.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...