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Show "Authentic Images" buyer search option.


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So can anyone from support explain what this new search option is and how it affects contributors?

image.thumb.png.c2a5396d24cc2e71262e8e1d7b6f7e8f.png

What on earth is "Only authentic" ?

What process decides if an image is authentic or not?  Artificial Stupidity? Reviewers that give rejections as "Silver Halide dust"?

It produces different results when clicked but no explanation at all as to what.

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A few dictionary definitions:

'being what it is claimed to be; genuine: '

'If something is authentic, it is real, true, or what people say it is':

'Of undisputed origin and not a copy; genuine'.

For literal people like myself, that's what it means to me.  For example, if I upload a genuine 1930's photo to a site 'authentic' is one of my keywords.  Buy in any case, as far as I am concerned, all of my images fit the categories above.

However, in the world of Sstock, who knows?  I only know that it's not in any of my keywords on Sstock - I wonder whether its lack as a keyword would detrimentally affect the finding of images by buyers.

I would love to know how Sstock has managed to separate the 'authentic' images from the 'inauthentic'.

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Here's a question:

If you have a plastic duck photo on Sstock, is it:

a)  'inauthentic' because it is not a real duck or

b) 'authentic' because it is a real plastic duck?

That said, I assume this term is actually much more applicable to, and aimed at, modelled lifestyle images (which essentially aren't actually authentic if they are using models) ...

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Would be nice to know (i) what authentic means here and (ii) who/what decides it.

I did wonder if it could refer to photoshopped images but on some areas i know, toggling authentic ON, the top images are ones i know are photoshopped (because i know the person who made them).

Would be nice if SS actually bothered telling contributors about new search filters so they'd know and can act accordingly.

I really hope they haven't employed the Artificial Stupidity to decide what photos are authentic or not.  You know, the same system that wants a model release for clouds or a tattoo release for wooden piers...

 

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Looking at the difference between 'only authentic' and 'not' it seems to me to be an excellent way of confusing buyers. The difference in what you get served up by clicking on 'only authentic' seems nonsensical.

If I do it for 'duck', I first get mostly pics of live ducks + a few plastic bath ducks and and with 'only authentic', I get live ducks + cooked and sliced duck straight out th' oven + one plastic bath duck. Seems a bit ducky daft to me! 🙃

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  • 3 weeks later...

This miracle came to me. So far only appeared on mobile, so I did not use screenshots.
I entered a couple of requests (random and set "only by photos"), this is what happened:
request "Pine forest" - it was 1583984, it is 457930, Throw out 2/3 of the photos. After that, I look at the photo and see that the remaining ones have big problems with reliability. There is often a forest in the background, and the main object is a road, a river, a meadow, a house, and there are even explicit illustrations on 1 page (choose only a photo). Almost the entire remaining forest does not belong to pine, most often it is Spruce, but deciduous is also found. And it's all on 1 page!
My photos were thrown out of the search, while I know for sure that there is a lot of pine, it was not made of plasticine, not plastic, and I did not draw it.

панорама-лес-сосны-ель-600w-1784

Pine forest

The most amazing thing is that if you enter a similar request in Russian (сосновый лес), then after this filter, 15 images remain out of one and a half million! Of these 15 photos, 2 are with a helicopter and 1 with a house.

Is it really worth working for sliders? It's a shame to show such a result to your superiors, but here they show them to clients. It doesn't matter if it's beta or alpha with omega. For the initial conclusions, it was possible to show the results of the filter to a student of grade 2, and not disgrace ...

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To me, since I first saw this feature, it has always been very clear what is meant with "authentic". It's a photograph of a real situation, in opposite to a staged one.

For example, let's take a dog at a vet.

This is an "authentic" photo. It shows a dog in a real vet clinic:
dog-vet-young-female-french-600w-1278852

This on the opposite is not authentic:
cute-young-dog-veterinarian-hands-600w-1

No vet clinic I have ever seen (and with my amount of pets I've been to a lot) looks like this. No vet has ring binders or plants as decoration in his examination rooms. Would actually be quite bad, seeing as so many indoor plants are toxic to pets. It's very clear that this is just staged on the table of someone's living room.

Let's look at another example:
happiness-woman-white-robe-listens-600w-

This looks more like a real vet clinic though still more empty than I am used to, however, my vets don't look like models, nor are they happily smiling while examining my pets (Who are usually fighting to get away...) and the lighting conditions aren't like in a studio.


The first photo is mine and when I uploaded it I did not have much hopes that it would sell, simply because there were so many "clean, perfect, shiny" pictures of dogs at vets available. However, surprisingly it is a regular seller for me. When I do a reversed google search I most often actually find it on webpages from vets. I think to them that the other photos are staged and look "fake" is even more obvious.

Not saying that the other photos don't sell and that there wasn't a demand for it. I actually think they probably sell much better than my photo - but there is also a demand for "authentic" photos, for other purposes.



The problem I have with this whole authentic business on Shutterstock is - How in the world does an AI determine what is "authentic" and what not? Are photos with poor lighting conditions automatically "authentic"? Smiling people "unauthentic"? I have really no idea by what criteria an AI would determine what is authentic or not. 

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27 minutes ago, Firn said:

To me, since I first saw this feature, it has always been very clear what is meant with "authentic". It's a photograph of a real situation, in opposite to a staged one.

For example, let's take a dog at a vet.

This is an "authentic" photo. It shows a dog in a real vet clinic:
dog-vet-young-female-french-600w-1278852

This on the opposite is not authentic:
cute-young-dog-veterinarian-hands-600w-1

No vet clinic I have ever seen (and with my amount of pets I've been to a lot) looks like this. No vet has ring binders or plants as decoration in his examination rooms. Would actually be quite bad, seeing as so many indoor plants are toxic to pets. It's very clear that this is just staged on the table of someone's living room.

Let's look at another example:
happiness-woman-white-robe-listens-600w-

This looks more like a real vet clinic, however, my vets don't look like models, nor are they happy smiling white examining my pets and the lighting conditions aren't like in a studio.


The first photo is mine and when I uploaded it I did not have much hopes that it would sell, simply because there were so many "clean, perfect, shiny" pictures of dogs at vets available. However, surprisingly it is a regular seller for me. When I do a reversed google search I most often actually find it on webpages from vets. I think to them that the other photos are staged and look "fake" is even more obvious.

Not saying that the other photos don't sell and that there wasn't a demand for it. I actually think they probably sell much better than my photo - but there is also a demand for "authentic" photos, for other purposes.



The problem I have with this whole authentic business on Shutterstock is - How in the world does an AI determine what is "authentic" and what not? Are photos with poor lighting conditions automatically "authentic"? Smiling people "unauthentic"? I have really no idea by what criteria an AI would determine what is authentic or not. 

Firn - you’re into something here which also is on my mind. If the meaning of ‘authentic’ photos is to show photos of natural people in natural surroundings - or photos not staged too much (your example is a good one) it would be a really good and usable thing. The problem is that neither the customers nor contributors have any hint whatsoever of what it mean.

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My main worry is, as with the visual appeal thing is SS isn't communicating to buyers OR contributors what these new features are, how they work or what the intent it.

That makes it impossible for a buyer to understand what they're being shown and impossible for a contributor to tailor submissions for the filters.

Communication has always been poor from SS (mysterious absence of anything official on here, the contributor announcements etc on these) and buyers (look at their TrustPilot) and it really doesn't have inspire confidence.

 

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4 hours ago, Wilm Ihlenfeld said:

If, for example, clippings or mockups can be removed by filters in the search, this may reduce sales for shutterstock.

Yes, and also I think that 'staged' 'unnatural' images sell better than 'natural' images, so that can't be the idea here. In that case SS would do themselves a disservice. I'm afraid that SS don't know themselves what the point is - like the weird and incomprehensible thing with 'most popular' ... SS are just using the contributors as 'guinea pigs' for different ideas. Or maybe it's just random selections to reduce the results when customers are searching ..?

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