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Is Nikon 5300 dslr camera good for the general photography


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Hey
I am using Nikon D5300 with kit lenses 18-140 mm.  I definitely think it is decent but I have a loooot of rejections. Especially landmarks are often rejected and I need to put quite a lot of time in these photos and sometimes need to try submit it a lot of times before getting accepted which is time consuming. Closeup, wildlife rarely have any problem but because of my lenses I really need to remember about light. Outdoor daylight images are fine.

It is possible to shot with it but It requires a little more work. After a while you will figure out what they accept, how to edit images for them to accept it and then it gets less frustrating. Maybe if you had better lenses than me, it would be way easier.

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I started with a D3200 and it's fine for stock so I'd presume the D5300 is too. Get a decent lens though, if you're using a kit lens your bound to run into trouble, I had the 18-55mm kit lens and it is worse than useless for stock, or anything else other than snaps, but why bother, better with a phone for snaps! I still use my D3200 mainly in combo with a Tamron 90mm macro lens. That isn't too expensive and is versatile too. 
This is going to apply to any camera you have. The best camera in the world with a naff lens is still going to give you rejections here.
Hopefully one of the real photogs will answer, but imo it will be fine with a decent lens. Without you'll probably have to use work arounds to reduce rejections as Amverlly has pointed out.

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It will work fine, as long as you understand it's limitations. The sensor in a D5300 is the same sensor as in the equivalent D7x00 series camera. The main difference is features and convenience, not image quality (with the exception of focus fine tune, see below).

You will want good glass, primes will be the most cost effective and generally faster than good zooms.

Avoid "super zoom" type lenses (18-200, 18-140, 28-300, etc) as they offer poor image quality, and they are also very slow. For zoom lenses, stick with those that offer a constant aperture throughout the zoom range (usually f/2.8), these are generally better lenses (although not always, I had a Nikon 24-120mm f/4, and I found it to be a terrible lens).

AFAIK, the D5x00 series does not offer fine tune for focus, so you will may not be able to get perfect focus using the viewfinder on all lenses. It the lens and camera match perfectly, then great, but usually they do not. They may be close but not perfect, and this will show in the sharpness of your photos.

I recommend testing all your lenses as follows:

  1. You will need good light (a flash won't help), bright sunlight works best.
  2. Set the camera on a sturdy tripod, and aim it at a perfectly flat printed target mounted at about 20x the focal length of the lens from the camera. The target should be perfectly parallel to the focal plane (sensor). For zooms, you should use the longest focal length for the entire process.
  3. Make sure the camera is set to RAW, so there are no in-camera changes made to the images (such as sharpening and noise removal). If shooting for stock, you probably want to shoot raw anyway.
  4. Set the camera to A (aperture) priority, and select the widest aperture (often f/2.8 for decent zooms,  f/1.8 for many zooms).
  5. Make sure the camera is set to focus using the shutter release button (so that the remote will focus as well), and not to focus using only a button on the back (not sure about this on the D5x00 series cameras).
  6. Using mirror lockup and a remote release, take 10 shots of the target. Between each shot, un-focus camera, and let the camera re-focus looking through the viewfinder (so the phase detect focus sensor is used).
  7. Now, repeat the above, but using live view instead of the viewfinder. Since live view uses the sensor for focusing (rather than the separate phase detect focus sensor), live view should give perfect focus.
  8. Now, compare the images taken focusing through the viewfinder with the images taken focusing using live view. You must view the images at 100%. If you don't zoom in to 100% to check them, you won't be able to tell anything.
  9. The photos taken in live view should be tack sharp. If not, you need a better quality lens (or yours is defective), or your tripod isn't sturdy enough, or there is a problem with your technique.
  10. If the photos taken focusing using the viewfinder (phase detect) are as sharp as the ones taken using live view, then the lens is focusing perfectly on your camera and you are all set with that lens.
  11. If the photos taken focusing with the viewfinder are not as sharp as those taken using live view, then that lens doe not focus perfectly on your camera. Without the ability to use focus fine tune (like on the D7x00 series, and the D500 and all FX cameras), then you cannot get perfect focus with that lens through the viewfinder. It may be good enough for vacation snapshots, but possibly not good enough for stock photography. BUT, using live view, you should be able to get perfectly sharp photos because the image sensor will be doing the focusing. A tripod is strongly recommended in this case.

So, to sum it all up, as long as you shoot raw, and can get perfect focus, there is no difference in image quality between the D5x00 and the more expensive D7x00 series cameras, as they generally share a common sensor. With good technique you should be able to get perfect photos.

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Hi there, 

Many of my images in my port was taken with D5300. The only limitations I felt was - 

1. ISO capabilities,  being APS C sensor from NIKON.

2. Limited number of buttons on camera body, making the user to dig into menus to change settings. 

As long as above two are OK with you, for me there is no reason to think that this camera will hold you back from shooting general things. As for close up, it is OK but for wildlife, you may want some more fps.

All the best!

Regards, 

Rudra

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23 hours ago, Linda Bestwick said:

I started with a D3200 and it's fine for stock so I'd presume the D5300 is too. Get a decent lens though, if you're using a kit lens your bound to run into trouble, I had the 18-55mm kit lens and it is worse than useless for stock, or anything else other than snaps, but why bother, better with a phone for snaps! I still use my D3200 mainly in combo with a Tamron 90mm macro lens. That isn't too expensive and is versatile too. 
This is going to apply to any camera you have. The best camera in the world with a naff lens is still going to give you rejections here.
Hopefully one of the real photogs will answer, but imo it will be fine with a decent lens. Without you'll probably have to use work arounds to reduce rejections as Amverlly has pointed out.

I reckon that with kit lenses you can be lucky or unlucky. I had a 18-55mm for my D90 and it was very good and sharp (usually used at f5.6-8). I have a 18-70mm which is not as sharp as the 18-55mm and when I bought my D5200 used, because the camera has no AF with my old Nikkor 50mm f1.8 AF-D,  I got a new Nikkor AF-S 50mm f1.8  and that was a really bad lens. Nikon reckoned the lens was OK so I sold it to a guy doing video (less likely to notice its lack of sharpness!) and bought a Yongnuo 50mm f1.8 for one third of the price of the Nikkor and sharper too!

Any lens you buy, you have to test it thoroughly and send it back immediately if it doesn't meet expectations. I like the D5000 series Nikon cameras because they have a fully articulated monitor. None of the FX models does.

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1 hour ago, stevemart said:

 when I bought my D5200 used, because the camera has no AF with my old Nikkor 50mm f1.8 AF-D,  I got a new Nikkor AF-S 50mm f1.8  and that was a really bad lens. Nikon reckoned the lens was OK so I sold it to a guy doing video (less likely to notice its lack of sharpness!) and bought a Yongnuo 50mm f1.8 for one third of the price of the Nikkor and sharper too!.

This sounds like a focus tuning issue, I have a Nikon 50mm AF-S f/1.8, and it is very sharp. In all the reviews I have seen and in all the sample photos, the Nikon lens is far superior to the Yongnuo.

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5 hours ago, Doug McLean said:

 

This sounds like a focus tuning issue, I have a Nikon 50mm AF-S f/1.8, and it is very sharp. In all the reviews I have seen and in all the sample photos, the Nikon lens is far superior to the Yongnuo.

Maybe a focus tuning issue but the Nikon D5200 doesn't have focus tuning!  Yep! My old 50mm f1.8 is one of the sharpest lenses I have but doesn't AF on the D5200 and that's why I wanted the the AF-S 50mm f1.8 but it really was crap (even though Nikon won't admit it). I bought the new lens for a commission but didn't test it first (my mistake). One month later, I sent it to Nikon service and they said it was up to spec but it wouldn't even resolve the dot matrix on a printed brochure which all my other lenses would. I gave up trying to convince Nikon that it was a bum lens and sold it! It really was a heap of s**t and I told Nikon Service that I would never buy a Nikon lens new again if this was their opinion. They said they didn't give a s**t........so no new Nikkors for me..........anyway, I prefer Sony mirrorless now.

For APS-C, the Sony A6000 is far superior to the Nikon D5200. Fits in a pocket, has a tilting but (alas) not fully articulating monitor, the kit lens (that I have 16-50mm) is excellent and the Sigma 60mm f2.8 lens for the Sony is just so incredibly sharp (bought used for €100) that it's difficult to believe! If I thought that I had a real future in photography (I'm 70), I would dump the Nikons and go Sony as the Sony just seems to produce many more sharp and usable photo's.

Here's one from the Sony with kit lens @ f8...handheld & studio strobe:

V-5-BodyPeelGarnalen-HD.jpg

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Only going on my experience with lens, which isn't much! But I have heard time and again to avoid kit lens, and from my experience I'd agree. Interesting to hear it's hit or miss though. May be that's reason enough to buy separately? But I also agree testing out individual lenses makes sense. If it's good or bad you'd soon know and avoid expensive mistakes.

I keep thinking of making the jump from Nikon to Sony. I'm sure the Sony mirrorless cameras would suit me much better, (the D800 is a heavy brick I could do with being half the weight) but it's a huge decision. Bit of a scary leap!

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5 hours ago, Linda Bestwick said:

Only going on my experience with lens, which isn't much! But I have heard time and again to avoid kit lens, and from my experience I'd agree. Interesting to hear it's hit or miss though. May be that's reason enough to buy separately? But I also agree testing out individual lenses makes sense. If it's good or bad you'd soon know and avoid expensive mistakes.

I keep thinking of making the jump from Nikon to Sony. I'm sure the Sony mirrorless cameras would suit me much better, (the D800 is a heavy brick I could do with being half the weight) but it's a huge decision. Bit of a scary leap!

Yep! Changing systems is a big and expensive step. I actually bought the Sony A6000 & kit lens for my wife but she never used it. I found that it could be carried quite easily in my anglers/photographers jacket pocket and I was amazed at how sharp the photo's were (no doubt helped by the VR system built into the kit lens). I've bought a few extra lenses for it and despite depressingly poor reviews of the kit lens and 55-210mm zoom, I still get pretty good results (not so much at the extremes of wide-angle and telephoto)  but then again, I'm very much an f5.6-f8 kinda shooter.

To go to Sony from Nikon would involve pecuniary pain because when you're used to the D800, the Sony switch would have to be to an R7Mk3. And then the Sony lenses!!! Like the Nikon D850, the Sony 7Riii has hardly dropped in price for either new or on the secondhand market so you can't get into Sony cheaply even if you buy used. Nikon D800's, on the other hand, are dirt cheap! I got mine a couple of years ago from a pro-photographer for €650 incl. Nikon battery grip. It had been regularly serviced by Nikon and had 110K shots on the clock. Still going strong but it is a big, heavy lump! Still, I'm thinking of getting another D800 or D800E because they too are pretty cheap now and they're cheaper than D750s in the used market here.....and the D800s are all Made in Japan just like the D4,5,6 series. I'm also not aware of any major problems with D800's as there have been with D600s and D750s. Dunno why but I'm not even tempted by Nikon Z. I get the impression that Canon with its 'R' series has done its homework better than Nikon.

Maybe for SS we should all just get iPhone 12 Pro as this article suggests:

Why Professional Photographers Should Use the iPhone 12 Pro Series
https://www.shutterstock.com/blog/taking-photos-with-iphone-12-pro

At 10cent/dl, it would only take me 5+ years to pay it off! 🤣

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On 2/19/2021 at 10:23 AM, Linda Bestwick said:

Haha, I know where I'd rather invest my £1000! Nice little ad for Apple though 🙄

I haven't been tempted by the Nikon mirrorless cameras either. Yeh, a switch to Sony for me would be expensive, but honestly just the weight difference alone makes it hugely tempting! 

 

Funny. I've also not been tempted by the Nikon Z. I see now that a large number of used Nikon Z6s are on offer which doesn't give me much confidence to convert. I read complaints about the Sony menu system but I find the Fn button quite handy for the majority of the adjustments I want to make.

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