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  • 3 weeks later...

Hey, Juliana!

I've been trying to use the Microsoft Photos application (included in Microsoft Windows 10 Home Edition operating system) auto-correction feature to improve my raw photographies.

But not-so-much luck so far, my photographies with noise were still rejected after editing.

I suppose it is obvious, yet it is better to make good raw photos without noise and remove the root of the problem, not the symptom.

Maybe someone more experienced will help us, since I'm also struggling with this problem.

editin with Microsoft Photos.png

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The free apps included in your operating system may be okay for images that don't need any post processing, but otherwise aren't much use.  I use Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom, which have built in noise reduction filters and can be licensed for $10US per month.  Keep in mind that noise reduction software basically just blurs the image, so it only gets you so far.

Camera noise is directly related to the size of your camera sensor and how much light you're dealing with.  Larger sensors handle lower light better than smaller sensors.  Most top end pro cameras have sensors the size of old 35mm film frames, where as most consumer cameras have sensors about half that size.  Even the consumer cameras are fine for most uses, providing you have lots of light.  If you're using a phone camera, that sensor is half the size of your pinky nail and while they might be okay out in full daylight, the image quality is going to fall apart really quickly in low light.

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I've recently started uploading video and have had the same issue with noise. I use Premiere Pro to reduce noise which helps but you can only go so far without losing image sharpness. I found my GoPro Hero 8 only took acceptable videos in sunny daytime conditions. Even then, if there was a lot of texture in shot it didn't cope well (e.g. forests with leaves on the floor, sandy beaches etc). Have the same issue on stills with my Nikon D3500 - pin sharp on sunny days at open aperture but otherwise can be difficult to get non-noisy, sharp photos. Have bitten the bullet and bought a much better camera with a larger sensor - Nikon Z6ii - to use for both stills and video. Hoping over time the commission I earn will help pay for the camera as it wasn't cheap!

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/7/2021 at 10:24 PM, David Buzzard said:

The free apps included in your operating system may be okay for images that don't need any post processing, but otherwise aren't much use.  I use Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom, which have built in noise reduction filters and can be licensed for $10US per month.  Keep in mind that noise reduction software basically just blurs the image, so it only gets you so far.

Camera noise is directly related to the size of your camera sensor and how much light you're dealing with.  Larger sensors handle lower light better than smaller sensors.  Most top end pro cameras have sensors the size of old 35mm film frames, where as most consumer cameras have sensors about half that size.  Even the consumer cameras are fine for most uses, providing you have lots of light.  If you're using a phone camera, that sensor is half the size of your pinky nail and while they might be okay out in full daylight, the image quality is going to fall apart really quickly in low light.

Thank you very much, David!

Your answer is really helpful to me! 🙂🙂🙂

 

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On 3/16/2021 at 7:26 AM, D MacDonald said:

I've recently started uploading video and have had the same issue with noise. I use Premiere Pro to reduce noise which helps but you can only go so far without losing image sharpness. I found my GoPro Hero 8 only took acceptable videos in sunny daytime conditions. Even then, if there was a lot of texture in shot it didn't cope well (e.g. forests with leaves on the floor, sandy beaches etc). Have the same issue on stills with my Nikon D3500 - pin sharp on sunny days at open aperture but otherwise can be difficult to get non-noisy, sharp photos. Have bitten the bullet and bought a much better camera with a larger sensor - Nikon Z6ii - to use for both stills and video. Hoping over time the commission I earn will help pay for the camera as it wasn't cheap!

I am sure you will see a huge improvement with the Nikon Z6ii, I bought the Z6 last year and upgraded from the Nikon D5600. The image quality was very good with 5600 and I still use it for photos but the video quality was hard work to achieve acceptable results, the Z6 is excellent for videos with the full frame sensor and IBIS which works very well and the auto focus never lets me down. 

I am sure you will be impressed with the Z6ii, certainly with the difference with footage quality.

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