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Once again, I need to do a project which relies on Bezier curves. Like I mentioned the last time I tried this particular tool in Photoshop, I found them pretty tricky to use. I followed a number of tutorials and was able to manipulate them into the specific shapes that I wanted some of the time. Though I definitely didn't master them. 

Anyhow, my query relates to the thickening of these curves / lines after the drawing is complete. I noticed with one tutorial video, it looks like you can apply thickening to a closed path by clicking inside it and choosing the appropriate option. Though can you also thicken an open path like a curvy line that's not connected to anything? Additionally, can you choose different thicknesses for your Bezier curves? Ideally, I'd like lines that would look good in an illustration - ie not too thin and not too thick. 

 

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Okay once again, just like with my previous project, I'm just going to have it to give up and try something else. Bezier curves are just too damn hard. I did more or less okay with the tutorials. When I did the exercises, things looked promising. It looked like I was sort of getting the hang of it more or less. Though when I started doing the project (tracing around a shape) it was a disaster. Lines curving totally the opposite way that I want them to and in unexpected ways too. And no manipulation of the handles / control points will fix them. I'm trying to trace a drawing of mine and it is an exercise in frustration trying to do so with Bezier curves. 

I actually have a number of drawings to trace. What I'm considering now is getting some transparency film for overhead projectors and trace the drawings with coloured markers. Then I can scan the transparencies. 

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I actually just managed to do a simple little artwork using Bezier curves. I wasn't tracing any of my drawings but it could still be useful for my project. With regards to making the lines thicker, there is the stroke path option that was explained in one of the videos I saw. But this makes the lines way too thick for me. Is there any way you can vary the thickness? The lines don't look entirely smooth either. Though looks like this can be corrected by deleting the path after applying something like stroke path. 

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9 hours ago, Patrick Cooper said:

Once again, I need to do a project which relies on Bezier curves. Like I mentioned the last time I tried this particular tool in Photoshop, I found them pretty tricky to use. I followed a number of tutorials and was able to manipulate them into the specific shapes that I wanted some of the time. Though I definitely didn't master them. 

Anyhow, my query relates to the thickening of these curves / lines after the drawing is complete. I noticed with one tutorial video, it looks like you can apply thickening to a closed path by clicking inside it and choosing the appropriate option. Though can you also thicken an open path like a curvy line that's not connected to anything? Additionally, can you choose different thicknesses for your Bezier curves? Ideally, I'd like lines that would look good in an illustration - ie not too thin and not too thick. 

 

It is clear that plotting with Bezier curves is very restrictive, but .. with a few hours of learning, it becomes really brilliant. Do not worry about the tutorials, in your menu, the pen tool with these 6 variants allow you to work miracles. at the beginning, for example, make a square, and find out how to make points, remove them, make curves, in a very short time you will get there. You will have to close the curve. for the thickness, it will be necessary to transform the trace into a selection with thickness, blurring and other functions ... and if like me you have worked hard on this function, reserve this function for small retouching or use the online application "Remove bg" and also "Vector Magic"

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