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Barry Paterson

Rejected for title with Latin species name

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16 minutes ago, Sue Rae Edmondson said:

I bet its not the latin name but the brackets that are causing the problem

I've always put the latin name in brackets and never had a problem. For example:

A bright red flower is on the end of an Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens). 

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Their AI should be renamed AS for "Artificial Stupidity"

 

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48 minutes ago, Charles Lewis said:

I've always put the latin name in brackets and never had a problem. For example:

A bright red flower is on the end of an Ocotillo (Fouquieria splendens). 

ah but maybe you got a reviewer who considers brackets as special characters

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I'm with Sue on this, don't use brackets. Brackets are special characters. Sometimes they get through, sometimes they don't, but I've not had problems since I stopped using brackets years ago. Latin names are acceptable.

You can add into the description "botanical name" just before you write the Latin name to make it clear to reviewers what it is.

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I have never used brackets but always use latin names - even if it is only species (with insects and other mini beasts sometimes the differences come down to microscopic examination of reproductive organs which I am not equipped to carry out lol) and generally do not get rejected

My last lot did get rejected but they also had x of 10 series in the title and I thought it was that but it could have been the latin I suppose - I made 2 submission attempts and then said sod it.  The change in payment schedule means I am not chasing after working out what is bothering SS I will just not re-submit stuff they reject for silly reasons.  Said images have been accepted at 3 other agencies so no issue with quality.

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I had a phase, sometime last year, where I would get images with botanic names rejected quite often (and not all plants have Latin names. Especially plants that were bred as houseplants and don't appear naturally sometimes have weird made up name endings, like the original plant's Latin name + some fancy sounding suffix). I then started to put these names in quotation marks. Even though they are special characters too, I didn't have problems with the names anymore ever since.

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On 8/30/2020 at 9:46 AM, Barry Paterson said:

Are latin names of plants no longer allowed? I always used to do this to aid with search.Rejection.png.0e70e89bf370f050e2a5566336568ffa.png

Is " American Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) berries close up" without spelling or grammar errors.

It's not a phrase or sentence, no punctuation and by the way Americana is the right way, not lower case like you have it. 😉 That's a spelling error. Which might be the rejection, not Latin Name like you assumed?

Maybe something like:

Close up photo of colorful berries on an American Polkweed, (Phytolacca Americana)

Hope that works.

 

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1 hour ago, HodagMedia said:

Is " American Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) berries close up" without spelling or grammar errors.

It's not a phrase or sentence, no punctuation and by the way Americana is the right way, not lower case like you have it. 😉 That's a spelling error. Which might be the rejection, not Latin Name like you assumed?

Maybe something like:

Close up photo of colorful berries on an American Polkweed, (Phytolacca Americana)

Hope that works.

 

Phytolacca Americana is incorrect. The second term in a scientific name (the species) is never capitilized. The original name is correct: Phytolacca americana.

I include the scientific name for almost all my uploads. But I use commas instead of brackets in the title. I have never had an image rejected for the title. My version of the title for the image in question would be like: "Close up of American pokeweed berries, Phytolacca americana".

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The obvious question is how grammar nazi do SS want to go?  If contributors reach the point of debating whether the use of a capital letter in whatever circumstances  is correct or incorrect then maybe just maybe SS are taking grammar rules a bit far.  Especially when many contributors do not use English as a first language - not to mention the complications of which form of English (British, American, or other countries also listed by microsoft as providing their own dictionary for spell checking) is being used to judge.

 

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Rejected because the title and description is "not" English. It is a Latin name of the species. It is a common name. 
ShutterStock reviewrs start to play on my nerves, as it takes so much effort and luck to get such a shot of rare species and some wanna-be reviewer who missed the primary school biology classes, will reject my hard work with a click of a button in a split of a second. Because he didn't understand the first 2 words.
How about Porsche Carrera? Is that also NOT ENGLISH??????? 
Saab Scania? 
Hope Idaho?
Is Commissaire Corrado Cattani pronto English then????

Here is my rejected description:

Calotes versicolor | Oriental Garden Lizard or Changeable Lizard is an agamid lizard found widely distributed in Indo-Malaya. It is an insectivore. It measures 10-20 cm plus 30-40 cm tail. 

_G9A1791_01.jpg

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On 8/31/2020 at 4:18 PM, Ernie Cooper said:

Phytolacca Americana is incorrect. The second term in a scientific name (the species) is never capitilized. The original name is correct: Phytolacca americana.

I include the scientific name for almost all my uploads. But I use commas instead of brackets in the title. I have never had an image rejected for the title. My version of the title for the image in question would be like: "Close up of American pokeweed berries, Phytolacca americana".

Well I learned something new today, I'd have thought that Americana would be capitalized since everywhere else it is. Of course if everywhere else is wrong... 🙂 Then the bots, AI or machine learning or whatever does the grammar reviews, could also be wrong.

Thanks for correcting my misconception that names a capitalized, especially Americana. I'm not a Latin student and don't really know taxonomy. Remind me next time, I'm not as fast as I used to be. 😉

I mostly took chemistry and physics and avoided biology. See what that gets me? A knowledge gap.

 

 

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I also used to use the brackets around the Latin names and they’d always be accepted. But recently they’re rejecting them so I just replaced the brackets for a comma and they go through fine. I think as Linda states, the new AI is seeing those as a special character 

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19 hours ago, Sheila Fitzgerald said:

I also used to use the brackets around the Latin names and they’d always be accepted. But recently they’re rejecting them so I just replaced the brackets for a comma and they go through fine. I think as Linda states, the new AI is seeing those as a special character 

Adjusting if I ever do any of that in the future. Also for @SIXPACK.BIZ the | is possibly not an acceptable character? If they are rejecting brackets, special characters would also be not allowed. Special characters?

Once again, without the actual information, people are assuming that Latin Names are the reason, when the rejection reason is:  "Title must be descriptive and relevant to the subject matter and must be in English. Titles cannot contain special characters, spelling/grammar errors, or repeat words/phrases in excess," I don't see lizard more that twice, and maybe agamid? Specific rejection reasons would be education and reduce the rejection rates.

I agree, submit again, check previously submitted, maybe you'll get lucky and get a human?

I enjoyed the car names, which I'll see about when I upload some more car photos, some day. 😃

Studebaker Hawk could be a reviewer because he's so mysterious... 😉

Recently accepted: "The black-and-white warbler (Mniotilta varia) is a species of New World warbler, and the only member of its genus, Mniotilta. Known for moss picking for insects and bugs."

blackandwhite-warbler-mniotilta-varia-sp

 

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