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17 hours ago, engagestock said:

It varies - The least ive made is close to $300 and the most around $1000 ... 272 images and +250 videos or so -- on average i may say around $500 a month

Great numbers, and great images - you clearly have a talent for this stock thing.

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On 8/7/2020 at 5:38 PM, balajisrinivasan said:

Oddly enough, even though I read a couple of books every week, I have no idea what the covers look like.

I read a kindle now so no nice covers to look at. However you have reminded me that I made a photo trip to Brighton as I was inspired by the photo covers on Peter James' detective series based there.

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2 hours ago, Milo J said:

Great numbers, and great images - you clearly have a talent for this stock thing.

Hi Milo, thanks. I was lucky enough to be introduced to microstock 3 years ago by someone who has been highly succesfull in the industy ( still makes more than 100k usd a year with his portfolio) and he though me the way and workflow he approaches it .. and im very gratefull for that. Learning a business the right way is priceless.

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4 hours ago, engagestock said:

Hi Milo, thanks. I was lucky enough to be introduced to microstock 3 years ago by someone who has been highly succesfull in the industy ( still makes more than 100k usd a year with his portfolio) and he though me the way and workflow he approaches it .. and im very gratefull for that. Learning a business the right way is priceless.

You are absolutely correct that that kind of mentoring and help from someone who is already successful is priceless.  I have a 4.5 hour training video that explains my entire strategy and workflow in minute detail, but people here scoff at the idea of investing a little money to learn how to make money.  I'm making $35K per year while many of them are lucky to make a few hundred a month, yet they say I have nothing to teach that they don't already know.  Then why am I successful and they are not?  I'll bet a lot of these people spent tens of thousands of dollars on college tutition, but won't spend a few bucks on specialized one-on-one training that can be put into use the very same day.  That is the kind of short-sighted mindset that holds people back.  It's true I'm not making a $100K per year from stock, but that's only because I don't put much effort into it.  Stock is just for fun and pocket money for me.

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2 hours ago, Doug Jensen said:

You are absolutely correct that that kind of mentoring and help from someone who is already successful is priceless.  I have a 4.5 hour training video that explains my entire strategy and workflow in minute detail, but people here scoff at the idea of investing a little money to learn how to make money.  I'm making $35K per year while many of them are lucky to make a few hundred a month, yet they say I have nothing to teach that they don't already know.  Then why am I successful and they are not?  I'll bet a lot of these people spent tens of thousands of dollars on college tutition, but won't spend a few bucks on specialized one-on-one training that can be put into use the very same day.  That is the kind of short-sighted mindset that holds people back.  It's true I'm not making a $100K per year from stock, but that's only because I don't put much effort into it.  Stock is just for fun and pocket money for me.

I personally purchased your course a couple of months ago on Vimeo. And 80% of the things you teach were the things my friend thought me. so it seems that There is such a thing as "doing stuff the right way" - the extra 20% were things new to me and i found them very valuable ... so that i introduced them into my workflow. Also i can tell you invested a good ammount of effort and time into the production of the course and you have a very clear and friendly way of teaching. I can recommend it without hesitation to any one looking to make money with video ...  i really liked it. Thanks Doug! 

 

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12 hours ago, engagestock said:

I personally purchased your course a couple of months ago on Vimeo. And 80% of the things you teach were the things my friend thought me. so it seems that There is such a thing as "doing stuff the right way" - the extra 20% were things new to me and i found them very valuable ... so that i introduced them into my workflow. Also i can tell you invested a good ammount of effort and time into the production of the course and you have a very clear and friendly way of teaching. I can recommend it without hesitation to any one looking to make money with video ...  i really liked it. Thanks Doug! 

 

Thank you for signing up and thank you very much for the compliments on the course.  I hope it helps you achieve even greater success!  There is plenty of room for all of us to be successful.  Despite the doom and gloomers, there is a still a lot of money to made in stock footage.  Maybe not as much as before, but still good enough that it deserves our effort.  When I write one of my books or produce one of my training videos I try to create the training that I would like to watch/read if the tables were reversed. And I think that approach works very well.  I'm not too surprised that there was a good amount of overlap between your friend's advice and mine.  I'll bet the differences mostly came down to workflow for video.  As you know from the video, sales are not the only measure of success.  I put great emphasis on speed and efficiency.  If I can add new clips (edit, grade, metatdata, upload, etc.) in half of the time it takes someone else, then that makes me twice as profitable even if we have the same total sales.  The metric that means most to me is to divide lifetime earnings by how much time you put into creating your portfolio.  That will give you your hourly earnings up to that point.  Obviously, that number will grow as older clips continue to earn more money over time, but ultimately that hourly wage is the only number that matters to me.  My hourly wage is $229 right now and growing.

A lot of my regular work, including the Olympics and other major gigs all went away this year, but money from stock footage just keeps rolling in without me lifting a finger. This is a great business.

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1 hour ago, Doug Jensen said:

Thank you for signing up and thank you very much for the compliments on the course.  I hope it helps you achieve even greater success!  There is plenty of room for all of us to be successful.  Despite the doom and gloomers, there is a still a lot of money to made in stock footage.  Maybe not as much as before, but still good enough that it deserves our effort.  When I write one of my books or produce one of my training videos I try to create the training that I would like to watch/read if the tables were reversed. And I think that approach works very well.  I'm not too surprised that there was a good amount of overlap between your friend's advice and mine.  I'll bet the differences mostly came down to workflow for video.  As you know from the video, sales are not the only measure of success.  I put great emphasis on speed and efficiency.  If I can add new clips (edit, grade, metatdata, upload, etc.) in half of the time it takes someone else, then that makes me twice as profitable even if we have the same total sales.  The metric that means most to me is to divide lifetime earnings by how much time you put into creating your portfolio.  That will give you your hourly earnings up to that point.  Obviously, that number will grow as older clips continue to earn more money over time, but ultimately that hourly wage is the only number that matters to me.  My hourly wage is $229 right now and growing.

A lot of my regular work, including the Olympics and other major gigs all went away this year, but money from stock footage just keeps rolling in without me lifting a finger. This is a great business.

Yes! indeed... the things that most benefited me from the course was regarding organization! Its clear that focusing on time consumption is also a way of making money! We do shoot different topics/niche but it only shows that there are indeed best practices regardless and it is not easy to understand or learn them alone!

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19 minutes ago, engagestock said:

Yes! indeed... the things that most benefited me from the course was regarding organization! Its clear that focusing on time consumption is also a way of making money! We do shoot different topics/niche but it only shows that there are indeed best practices regardless and it is not easy to understand or learn them alone!

Thank you for understanding that my purpose was not to tell people WHAT to shoot.  A lot of people don't get that.  We all live in different locations, have different interests, have different shooting styles, different access to friends and family, and we enjoy shooting different types of things.  That's exactly why I don't mind sharing what I have learned because the odds that YOU are going to go out and compete with me on what I have shot, or vice versa, is highly unlikely.  My goal was to get people to think of what kind of content has commercial value, what level of production value buyers are looking for, and then how to process that material efficiently and ensure customers can find it.  I think a lot of people really don't understand how critical the metadata is. The greatest footage in the world will never sell if a buyer never sees it in the search results.

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On 8/8/2020 at 3:10 PM, Doug Jensen said:

$3010 per month with 8900 videos. No photos.

Amazing Portfolio!  What is you primary lens you are using for most of these?

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2 hours ago, The Jungle Explorer said:

Amazing Portfolio!  What is you primary lens you are using for most of these?

Thank you.  It's interesting that you ask about the lens, but not the cameras that were used, which is a far more important factor.  But to try to answer your question, it's impossible to say what lens because I own quite a few lenses for different cameras. There is no single all-around lens that I use most of the time.  If you pointed out a certain clip I might remember which lens I used, but for many of them I'd have no idea.

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25 minutes ago, Doug Jensen said:

Thank you.  It's interesting that you ask about the lens, but not the cameras that were used, which is a far more important factor.  But to try to answer your question, it's impossible to say what lens because I own quite a few lenses for different cameras. There is no single all-around lens that I use most of the time.  If you pointed out a certain clip I might remember which lens I used, but for many of them I'd have no idea.

I only ask about your lens because there are countless great cameras out there and I only own the ones that I own, and am not going to switch systems. So, asking about the camera used is not relevant to my inquiry, at least by my thinking. I hope this makes sense.

I only looked at the first page of your portfolio and It seems to me that most of your shots were shot with a telephoto lens, and it seems that you were at a great distance from the subjects.  It would take a special lens to capture most of these shots.  I was just curious what sort of lens you were using.  

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Okay, I see what you're asking.  The telephoto clips in my portfolio are mostly like going to be shot with one of these lenses:

1) RED PL PRIME 300mm f/2.8

2) Canon 200-400mm f/4 w/ built-in 1.4x extender

3) Sony PXW-Z280 camcorder with built-in lens

 

I don't know what kind of camera you have, but what you want to look for in a good lens is:

1) A fast maximum aperture.  Preferably f/2.8 or better, but f/4 for a telephoto lens is still acceptable.

2) If a lens is a zoom lens, then the maximum aperture must be constant throughout the zoom range.  Meaning that when you zoom the lens, the aperture does not ramp up or down. If you see a lens advertised that shows a range for max. aperture,  something like "f/2.8 - f/5", that is a sign that it is a crappy consumer lens.  Move on.

3) Smooth manual focusing.

4) Stabilization is a bonus, but not necessarily required.

5) Any SLR or mirrorless lens that has more than a 3x zoom range and costs less than $2K is garbage. You're better off buying some budget prime lenses in two or three focal lengths.

I hope that helps.

 

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5 hours ago, Doug Jensen said:

Okay, I see what you're asking.  The telephoto clips in my portfolio are mostly like going to be shot with one of these lenses:

1) RED PL PRIME 300mm f/2.8

2) Canon 200-400mm f/4 w/ built-in 1.4x extender

3) Sony PXW-Z280 camcorder with built-in lens

 

I don't know what kind of camera you have, but what you want to look for in a good lens is:

1) A fast maximum aperture.  Preferably f/2.8 or better, but f/4 for a telephoto lens is still acceptable.

2) If a lens is a zoom lens, then the maximum aperture must be constant throughout the zoom range.  Meaning that when you zoom the lens, the aperture does not ramp up or down. If you see a lens advertised that shows a range for max. aperture,  something like "f/2.8 - f/5", that is a sign that it is a crappy consumer lens.  Move on.

3) Smooth manual focusing.

4) Stabilization is a bonus, but not necessarily required.

5) Any SLR or mirrorless lens that has more than a 3x zoom range and costs less than $2K is garbage. You're better off buying some budget prime lenses in two or three focal lengths.

I hope that helps.

 

Thanks a million.  Currently I have a Sony A6500. It takes great 4K video.  I do not have a good long telephoto lens at the moment.  My main three lens at this time is the Sony 18-135mm lens, a Sigma 30mm F1.4 and a Sigma 105mm F2.8 macro.  I do mostly macro nature photography for stock, and use the Sony lens for YouTube video. The 30mm, I use for family portraits and stuff.

I do own the Sigma 120-400mm f/4.5-5.6, but only because I got it for $80 because the AF is busted.  Not a bad lens for the money, but not as sharp as I would like and I have to have a lot of light because the lens is sharpest at f10.  

The problem with the Sony E mount system is that there are just not a lot of native telephone options. I mean the best option in my price range is the Sony FE 200-600mm lens at 2K. The next option is the Sony 400mm F4 at 11K. That ain't ever going to happen.  

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In my best years here, my income was close to 4 digits and always 3 digits per month. With about 5-6K clips at that time. I still own 4 digit income, but now looks like: $00.00.

I had great sucess with technology clips worldwide.

As far as new gear ... I'm looking at new R5, EOS, Canon. Substitute for my old EOS 60D. Possibly new RED Komodo. Who knows. Or just stay with my good old 60D. :)

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On 8/8/2020 at 11:19 PM, engagestock said:

It varies - The least ive made is close to $300 and the most around $1000 ... 272 images and +250 videos or so -- on average i may say around $500 a month

Great work! True stock footage work! :) In best years for microstock (2012 to 2017) you would get much more ... ;)

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9 hours ago, The Jungle Explorer said:

Thanks a million.  Currently I have a Sony A6500. It takes great 4K video. 

I have an A6300 I use mostly for stills and I don't think it or the A6500 would be a good choice for long-telephoto 4K stock footage no matter what lens you put on them due to rolling shutter issues and other shortcomings.

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On 8/7/2020 at 7:50 AM, Alexandre Rotenberg said:

This topic is taboo but since I disclose anyway I don't care. 

My average month on here is about $330 (and dropping fast) on just over 10,000 images and 1,000 clips.  

Hey this is new and great I think my content could work there! Does Arcangel accept payoneer as a payout method? thanks for sharing this info!

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NOTE:  This reply was in response to a post that Mr. Carrot has cowardly chosen to delete. I guess he regrets his post.

Mr. Carrot,

I don't really understand whatever point you are trying to make.  I do earn every penny I make at Shutterstock.  Do you think Shutterstock is paying me for clips that have not sold? If I am not earning it, why is there $3K per month being deposited into my PayPal account?  If you are not earning $3K per month, that is your choice. Nobody is to blame except YOU.  We all earn what we deserve.

The reason I view stock footage as a hobby is because I make much more money elsewhere doing my "normal" work.  Why would I put more effort into stock when it pays less than my regular work?  The clips I shoot for stock are mostly just shot for pleasure and I have no interest in turning it into a full-time job.  Doing the metadata sucks and I don't care to put any more time and effort into that part of my day. What is so hard to understand about that?

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5 minutes ago, Jeremy Lopez Foppiani said:

It's about stock footage actually.

Eactly.  I shoot a lot of photos for pleasure, but I wouldn't waste two seconds uploading them. Not worth my time for the pennies they would earn.

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2 minutes ago, Doug Jensen said:

Mr. Carrot,

I don't really understand whatever point you are trying to make.  I do earn every penny I make at Shutterstock.  Do you think Shutterstock is paying me for clips that have not sold? If I am not earning it, why is there $3K per month being deposited into my PayPal account?  If you are not earning $3K per month, that is your choice. Nobody is to blame except YOU.  We all earn what we deserve.

The reason I view stock footage as a hobby is because I make much more money elsewhere doing my "normal" work.  Why would I put more effort into stock when it pays less than my regular work?  The clips I shoot for stock are mostly just shot for pleasure and I have no interest in turning it into a full-time job.  Doing the metadata sucks and I don't care to put any more time and effort into that part of my day. What is so hard to understand about that?

Why you must be so agressive? I just asked a question.

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Just now, TheGlowingCarrot said:

Why you must be so agressive? I just asked a question.

No you didn't just ask a question. Go back and read your post.  Oh wait!! You can't because you chose to delete it.  Very nice.  Classy move, Mr. Carrot.

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