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Dear fellow photographers, my image has been rejected because they say it's out of focus... does it look out of focus to you? I used a tamron 90mm with VR off, a tripod and delayed exposure mode, so I'm no sure what is wrong here. Maybe because I used f/57 instead of something like f/22? Please help! (click on the image)

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Edited by monadic_photography

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Sorry to say that but the photo, is blury for sure. Try using f5.6, f6.3 or at least f7.1. The results will be much better.

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12 hours ago, Boky said:

Sorry to say that but the photo, is blury for sure. Try using f5.6, f6.3 or at least f7.1. The results will be much better.

Hey Boky, thanks for replying! Even when you click on the image, do you still see it as blurry?

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Monadic,

I'm curious what kind of camera are you using?   f/57 is not an aperture that "normal" cameras offer. 

If you really want to get in focus macro shots, I might suggest you try focus stacking images.  Light Diffraction at very small apertures, such as f/22 to f/57 causes an "Out of Focus" image.  Focus stacking is the only effective way I've found to improve focus on closeup shots.     

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8 hours ago, monadic_photography said:

Hey Boky, thanks for replying! Even when you click on the image, do you still see it as blurry?

Yes, the whole photo is blurry. Don't use f57.

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20 hours ago, Steve Bower said:

Monadic,

I'm curious what kind of camera are you using?   f/57 is not an aperture that "normal" cameras offer. 

If you really want to get in focus macro shots, I might suggest you try focus stacking images.  Light Diffraction at very small apertures, such as f/22 to f/57 causes an "Out of Focus" image.  Focus stacking is the only effective way I've found to improve focus on closeup shots.     

I used a Nikon D7100 with a Tamron 90mm macro.

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18 hours ago, monadic_photography said:

I used a Nikon D7100 with a Tamron 90mm macro.

Minimum aperture for that lens is f32 so something is off with your numbers.

Even f22 is going to give you diffraction blurriness. Use f16 maximum (Preferably f8) and stack focus.

It is best to actually try the range of apertures in a controlled setting to see for yourself where the range of clean focus is. When I had an older Tamron 90mm it was f5.6 to f16. Beyond that on either end it was a bit (for a macro lens) soft.

 

And, yes, your image of the rose is blurry.

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8 hours ago, chris kolaczan said:

Minimum aperture for that lens is f32 so something is off with your numbers.

How come you are the only one who questioned f57?

EDIT: How come you and Steve are the only ones who questioned f57 

 

To my knowledge f/57 doesn't even exist on any modern small format lens.

BTW, I get sharper images with my pinhole cameras and they have an aperture of f/233. The same with any of my pre-war vintage cameras. 

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I don't think this is really an aperture problem. even with f32 on that Tamron it would have looked better. I used to own that lens and used it with f32 (I know.... shoot me..) and it looked much better than this rose.

Something else is going on

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Rudy,

You should have read all the posts.  I brought this up early on.   I always liked you, so your forgiven.  😃 Joke! 

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12 minutes ago, Steve Bower said:

Rudy,

You should have read all the posts.  I brought this up early on.   I always liked you, so your forgiven.  😃 Joke! 

oooh Steve. I thought  I read all of them, but i guess not thorough enough. I am sorry, and I still like you :) 

I edited my post to rectify my error

 

I am still wondering where that f57 comes from and what is really going on here.

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Rudy, 

No sweat!  I was a little oblique in my comment so it's understandable why you might have missed it.

My only answer is he was using a 1.4x or 2x extender on his lens.  What would those aperture be?  I never was too good at "aperture math", Sorry.

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15 hours ago, Steve Bower said:

Rudy, 

No sweat!  I was a little oblique in my comment so it's understandable why you might have missed it.

My only answer is he was using a 1.4x or 2x extender on his lens.  What would those aperture be?  I never was too good at "aperture math", Sorry.

I don't use extenders (never have), but it would affect the lower portion. e,g, f4 becomes f5.6 or f8, but it will not go beyond the upper f's. A max lens aperture of f32 remains f32.

The "ideal" f stop though will be different/lower than with the original lens alone. An extender will affect diffraction and the circles of confusion will be larger.

 

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The aperture will only impact on how much of the image is in focus, but it all depends on where you focused. I am struggling to find the focus point in the image, so unsure how you are focusing. For macro, on a tripod, I always use the screen and zoom in to be very specific.

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40 minutes ago, Shirley Cronin said:

The aperture will only impact on how much of the image is in focus, but it all depends on where you focused. I am struggling to find the focus point in the image, so unsure how you are focusing. For macro, on a tripod, I always use the screen and zoom in to be very specific.

There is more to aperture and DoF than "how much".  At some point, diffraction will begin to play a roll (as mentioned before). It all depends on the lens where that point is, but it is rare if that point is smaller than f/11.Older lenses with fewer lens elements allow usually for a smaller aperture before diffractions begins to play a roll. Modern more complex lenses usually do not.   Doesn't mean you can't use that and smaller apertures, but at f/22 and smaller it usually becomes noticeable in most subject matters.

As also mentioned by Chris and Steve, for macro you might want to try f/8 and focus stack. Little bit more work, but better results. As long as the subject is not a living moving creature that is.

As far as practical use for focusing goes, a very general rule of thumb 1/3 of the total DoF is in front of the Focal point and 2/3 is behind, but with macro, the DoF is so small to begin with that this doesn't really matter much any more.

it also depends on the angle of the lens in relation to the subject. It does not depend however on the focal length of the lens. Some people think that telephoto lenses have a shorter DoF at any given aperture than wide angle lenses, but they do not. It's the same

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2 hours ago, Rudy Umans said:

There is more to aperture and DoF than "how much".  At some point, diffraction will begin to play a roll (as mentioned before). It all depends on the lens where that point is, but it is rare if that point is smaller than f/11.Older lenses with fewer lens elements allow usually for a smaller aperture before diffractions begins to play a roll. Modern more complex lenses usually do not.   Doesn't mean you can't use that and smaller apertures, but at f/22 and smaller it usually becomes noticeable in most subject matters.

I was just trying to keep it simple for the OP 🙂

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Hey guys, thanks for your input, I will try as you suggest and limit myself to f/16 minimum. I'm learning the ropes with macro.

As for the f/57, on Aperture Priority, this is the highest aperature it went up to after f/32. It did seem weird, but I didn't get it out of nowhere.

PS: I tried focus stacking for the first time a few days ago, and the results were horrific... it will take practice, but thanks for the tip! 🙂

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