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digitalchaos

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About digitalchaos

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    Member

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  • Website URL
    http://stockfootageguide.com

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  • Location
    Toronto, Canada
  • Interests
    Film-Making, Video Editing
  1. Hey Gabes, Welcome to the wonderful world of stock footage. 1) Neither is "better" per say, it depends on the application, the where and what you are shooting for. If were talking stock footage I'd go with 1080i over 720p, mind you 1080p beats both, and your t3i shoots 1080p! 2) Keep the ISO as low as you can as a general rule of thumb, just like in images. 3) Not particularly, but well even lit footage is usually good footage 4) Yes. .mov is a widely used video container for uploading stock footage, if not the standard. 5) Depends on what your trying to do to the foota
  2. Simply converting to ProRes will not "enhance" your footage by any means - Technically speaking; Every conversion, encoding, or rendering, is degrading the quality just a little bit as compared to the original footage file. ProRes is an intermediate codec that does an excellant job at being unnoticeable in quality loss from the file it's converting from (with larger file sizes of course). Thus we use it, mainly in the editing stages as to preserve the technical quality from the original/raw footage files when processing the footage for effects and such. Photo JPG has been the standard
  3. AVCHD to MOV convertor here: http://jmprocreative.com/avchd/. Process your files directly from the camera into stock footage clips. If you're on a windows machine looking for a free solution your options are slim to none. If you're on a mac, you can use iMovie to capture your AVCHD footage into an intermediate codec, then cut and convert to a stock footage finishing format with another program like MPEG Streamclip. --- All your stock footage solutions, answers and in-depth workflows provided in: The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Stock Footage Featuring: • Tips &
  4. If you're working on a PC then the pickings are slim. As mentioned before Aunsoft is the best software I have also personally found works best for PC workflows when working in AVCHD format - Learn more about it here --- All your stock footage solutions, answers and in-depth workflows provided in: The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Stock Footage Featuring: • Tips & Advice • Explained Concepts • Step By Step Breakdowns • How-To's & Techniques • Trusted and Used Workflows • In-depth Video Tutorials • Master Resources Guide http://stockfootagegui
  5. Hello and welcome to the footage forums. Shooting with the particular camera you mentioned is most likely not going to take you very far. This is for a few reasons such as video quality, formats, and frame rate standards. However, if the idea of creating a passive income from stock footage is something that has sparked an interest to you, then getting started is not far off, it's mostly just a matter of getting the proper hardware, and just start shooting. You don't need to invest so much money on the software side of things, in fact you can design a workflow in which is not only quic
  6. In lieu of reading your post I have created a quick tutorial for you to get you started on the right track - view it here: http://submit.shutterstock.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=129343 --- All your stock footage solutions, answers and in-depth workflows provided in: The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Stock Footage Featuring: • Tips & Advice • Explained Concepts • Step By Step Breakdowns • How-To's & Techniques • Trusted and Used Workflows • In-depth Video Tutorials • Master Resources Guide http://stockfootageguide.com
  7. Here's some quick beginner tips when working in Premiere Pro for stock footage. If you're importing footage files that were created directly from your DSLR camera, and placing them it onto the timeline, the idea is to keep all the settings and format the exact same, as to not lose any quality. As soon as you go to drag your raw stock footage clip(s) onto the timeline in Premiere Pro a "Clip Mismatch Warning" dialogue box will appear automatically. It's going to ask you if you want to use the settings from the clip(s) your importing as the settings to work in. We absolutely do, so Select CH
  8. Good find Rinder. Some great and accurate info on understanding codecs. --- All your stock footage solutions, answers and in-depth workflows provided in: The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Stock Footage Featuring: • Tips & Advice • Explained Concepts • Step By Step Breakdowns • How-To's & Techniques • Trusted and Used Workflows • In-depth Video Tutorials • Master Resources Guide http://stockfootageguide.com
  9. It really all depends on the content, short clips can sell very well depending on what they are, they could be endless loops as well. Generally I'd recommend keeping your clips no longer than 10-30 seconds unless you have too. --- All your stock footage solutions, answers and in-depth workflows provided in: The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Stock Footage Featuring: • Tips & Advice • Explained Concepts • Step By Step Breakdowns • How-To's & Techniques • Trusted and Used Workflows • In-depth Video Tutorials • Master Resources Guide http://stockfo
  10. --- All your stock footage solutions, answers and in-depth workflows provided in: The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Stock Footage Featuring: • Tips & Advice • Explained Concepts • Step By Step Breakdowns • How-To's & Techniques • Trusted and Used Workflows • In-depth Video Tutorials • Master Resources Guide http://stockfootageguide.com
  11. There seems to be a glitch sometimes when clicking your little video camera icon to see your portfolio, where instead of showing your portfolio, it just loads every clip on the site. Hopefully this will be addressed soon enough. --- All your stock footage solutions, answers and in-depth workflows provided in: The Ultimate Guide to Making Money with Stock Footage Featuring: • Tips & Advice • Explained Concepts • Step By Step Breakdowns • How-To's & Techniques • Trusted and Used Workflows • In-depth Video Tutorials • Master Resources Guide http://stoc
  12. Hey Carin, While the stock footage agencies still accept footage in standard definition, you will probably find that you'll have trouble selling footage shot in standard def from a camera like the XL1. While back in it's prime that was a great camera, the times have changed significantly and high definition has become the new standard, you would be putting yourself at a disadvantage by shooting with an SD cam even if it was a great cam back in the day. Unless the footage is really old, vintage, or special in some way I wouldn't bother with SD footage. - Julian. --- All your s
  13. Never seen anything like that before on a 7D, seems like your camera sensor may have been damaged somehow. I'd take it to a camera shop to get them to look for any damage.
  14. For all you beginners out there looking for some free tips and tricks to get ahead in the stock footage world sign up here: http://bit.ly/freestockfootagetips
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