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Desert road with car carrier truck
 

Desert road with car carrier truck

composition acceptable? power line is too distruptive? is it good photo for shutterstock?



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Uncertain

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Photo Information for Desert road with car carrier truck

Taken with FUJIFILM X-T10

  • 83.3 mm
  • 1/2000
  • f f/7.1
  • ISO 800
View all photo EXIF information

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Might get rejected for copyright infringement, basing that on the fact that some of my photos got rejected for the same, and they were rusted out junk cars with no visible logos. 

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thank you for helpful comments

i will try to brighten it a bit.

i'm not sure what the subject is.. atleast i wasn't when i shot it. i thought it was the truck but when i look now it seem like its the road sign.

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I think the exposure is good, not great but good. The mountains and desert could be a little lighter but are close enough to be called properly exposed. But you photographed the signs and the cars while they were in a shadow. Everything should be darker in a shadow, and everything is, so I think that the exposure is good. The real problem is the composition and the lighting. As noted there is no real subject, you cut the trailer in half, photographed electrical wires with no visible support and you used backlighting. Next time try photographing with the sun to your back. That way the cars, the signs, desert and the mountains will all be in the same light. The signs and the car hauler could work together if there was something on the signs that some how related to the cars or if the cars and the signs were somehow ironic. Here is an example, there is a town east of Dallas, Texas named Fate. If you could photograph a car hauler full of old crushed cars with the highway sign that said Fate then the irony might work.

Why are you using ISO 800 on a bright sunny day in a desert? That situation is where you want to use the lowest ISO setting on the camera. The lower the ISO number the greater the resolution will be and more resolution means sharper pictures. You could have used the same aperture and shot at ISO 100 @ 1/250 of a second. 

http://www.mikenortonphotography.com

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